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A course of approximately forty-five lectures in physical chemistry, twenty-five lectures in inorganic chemistry and thirty lectures in organic chemistry, with demonstrations and laboratory work throughout the year.

SУnлpus. (i) The fundamentals of physical chemistry. Electronic structure.

of atoms and molecules ; atomic structure and the Periodic Classification ; molecular structure and valence; electrovalence; covalence.

Properties of gases and liquids ; kinetic theory ; non-ideal gases and liquids.

' First law of thermodynamics ; Kirchhoff's law ; reversibility and maximum work ; Cannot cycle. Second law of thermodynamics ; entropy; maximum work function, free energy; Gibbs-Helmholtz equation. Chemical equilibrium and free energy change in ideal systems ; activity and activity coefficients ; chemical potential.. Solutions of non-electrolytes. Electrochemistry; Debye-Hiickel-Onsager theory. Applications to chemical problems. Electromotive force and chemical affinity ; standard electrode potentials ; oxidation-reduction potentials ;; applications of e.m.f. measurements. Equilibria in electrolyte solutions. Kinetics of homogeneous reactions ; order of reaction; 'collision theory applied to reactions. Phase rule;

one- and two-component. systems; condensed three-component systems...

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(ii) Systematic organic chemistry. An introduction to the following classes of aliphatic and aromatic compounds : carboxylic acids and their derivatives, nitro- compounds, amines, mercaptans, sulphides. A detailed study of certain classes of polyfunctional aliphatic compounds, including glycol, glycerol, ethylene oxide, dike- tones, dibasic acids, hydroxy acids, ketonic and aldehydic acids, ketonic and aldehydic alcohols, carbohydrates, amino acids, urea, proteins.

Optical and geometric isomerism, tautomerism and an introduction to the electronic interpretation of organic reactions.

(iii) Inorganic chemistry. Chemistry of the non-metals ; the halogens, sulphur;

nitrogen ; phosphorus; the hydrides of the elements ; reactions in non-aqueous solvents. Chemistry of the metals. Structural chemistry of solids ; silicates ; chemistry of layer and network structures. Co-ordination compounds. Transition metals; rare earth and actinide elements.

LABoRAToRY WORK. Seven hours per week, dealing with semi-micro qualitative and quantitative (both volumetric and gravimetric) analysis, involving examination of mixtures containing compounds of the more common cations and anions, and including experiments in elementary organic and physical chemistry.

A record of efficiency in performance and understanding of experiments will be kept and short tests may be given. This information will be used in determining whether a candidate passes or fails in the practical work, and in the award of honours at the Annual Examination.

The apparatus used in the course is supplied by the Chemistry Department;

a deposit must be paid and evidence of payment must be produced to the Depart- ment before practical classes begin (see p. 17).

Воoкs. (a) Recommended for preliminary reading:

Moore, W. J. Physical Chemistry. (2nd ed., Longmans.)

Mark, H. Physical Chemistry of High Polymeric Systems. (Interscience.).

Wells, A. F.—The Third Dimension in Chemistry. (O.U.P.)

Kauzmann, W.—Quantum Chemistry. Chapter I only. (Academic Press.) (b) Prescribed text-books:

*Glasstone, S.—Textbook of Physical Chemistry. (Van Nostrand.)

*Coulson, C. A.—Valence. (O.U.P.)

*Finar, I. L.—Organic Chemistry. (Longmans.)

*Moeller, T.—Inorganic Chemistry. (Wiley.)

or Gould, E. S. Inorganic Reactions and Structure. (Holt.)

*Emeléus, H. J., and Anderson, J. S. Мodеrп Aspects of Inorganic Chemistry.

(2nd ed., Routledge.)

*Kolthoff, I. M., and Sandell, E. В.—Y'extbook of Quantitative Inorganic Analysis. (Macmillan.)

(c) Recommended for general reading and reference:

Moelwyn-Hughes, E. A. Physical Chemistry. (Pergamon Press.)

Steiner, L. E. Introduction to Chemical Thermodynamics. (2nd ed., McGraw- Hill.)

Prigogine, I., and Defay, R.-Chemical Thermodynamics. (Longmans.) Ketelaar, J. A. A.—Chemical Constitution. (2nd ed., Elsevier.)

Glasstone, S.—Introduction to Electrochemistry. (Van Nostrand.)

Findlay, A., Campbell, A. N., and Smith, N. O.—The Phase Rule and its Applications. (9th ed., Dover.)

Findlay, A., and Kitchener, J. A. Practical Physical Chemistry. (8th ed., Longmans.)

Baker, J. W. Electronic Theories of Organic Chemistry. (O.U.P.) Hine, J. Physical Organic Chemistry. (McGraw-Hill.)

Reed, R. I., and Tucker, S. 1.—Organic Chemistry Electronic Theory and Reaction Mechanism. (Macmillan.)

Wells, A. F.—Structural Inorganic Chemistry. (Oxford.)

Latimer, W. 1.—The Oxidation States of the Elements. (Prentice-Hall.) Sidgwick, N. V.—The Chemical Elements and their Compounds. (Oxford.) Remy, H.—Treatise on Inorganic Chemistry. (2 vols., Elsevier.)

82

EXAMINATION. One 3-hour paper in Physical Chemistry, one 2-hour paper in Inorganic Chemistry and one 2-hour paper in Organic Chemistry.

Students who have not maintained a satisfactory standard in the laboratory course throughout the year will be required to take a practical examination.

CHEMISTRY PART IIB

A course of approximately forty-five lectures in physical chemistry, ten lectures in inorganic chemistry and thirty lectures in organic chemistry, with demonstrations and practical work throughout the year. The course provides a survey of the subject for those proceeding to a degree with a biological science as major subject.

SYLLABUS, (i)

The fundamentals of physical chemistry.

Electronic structure of atoms and molecules ; atomic structure and the Periodic Classification molecular structure and valence; electrovalence; covalence.

Kinetic theory of gases; first law of thermodynamics; Kirchhoff's law;

reversibility and maximum work; Cannot cycle. Second law of thermodynamics;

entropy ; maximum work function; tree energy; Gibbs-Helmholtz equation.

Chemical equilibrium and free energy change in ideal systems ; activity and activity coefficients; chemical potential. Solutions of non-electrolytes. Electro- chemistry ; Debye-Hückel-Onsager theory. Applications to chemical problems.

Electromotive force and chemical affinity ; . standard electrode potentials;

oxidation-reduction potentials ; applications of e.m.f. measurements. Equilibria in electrolyte solutions. Kinetics of homogeneous reactions ; order of reaction;

collision theory applied to reactions. Colloidal systems ; actions at interfaces.

(ii) Systematic organic chemistry.

As for Chemistry Part IIA.

(iii) Inorganic chemistry.

General inorganic chemistry discussed in terms of the periodic table. The chemistry of the biologically important elements O, S, N, P, and the halogens. The transition elements; complex formation ; structure and redox reactions of complexes.

LABORATORY WORK. Seven hours per week, dealing with semi-micro qualitative and quantitative (both volumetric and gravimetric) analysis, involving examination of mixtures containing compounds of the more common cations and anions, and including experiments in elementary organic and physical chemistry.

A record of efficiency in performance and understanding of experiments will be kept and short tests may be given. This information will be used in determining whether a candidate passes or fails in the practical work, and in the award of honours at the Annual Examination.

The apparatus used in the course is supplied by the Chemistry Department : a deposit must be paid and evidence of payment must be produced to the Department before practical classes begin (see p. 13). .

Воoкs. (a) Recommended for preliminary reading:

Kauzmann, W.—Quantum

Chemistry.

Chapter I only. (Academic Press.) (b) Prescribed text-books :

(i) For those

not

proceeding to Chemistry Part IIIB.

*Moore, W.

J. Physical Chemistry.

(2nd ed., Longmans.)

or

*Daniels, F.

and

Alberty, R.

A.—Physical Chemistry.

(Wiley.)

*English, J., and Cassidy, H.

G. Principles of Organic Chemistry.

(McGraw- Hill.)

or *Finar. I.

L.—Organic Chemistry.

(Longmans.) (ii) bor those proceeding to Chemistry Part 1IIВ.

*Glasstone,

S.—Textbook of Physical Chemistry.

(Van Nostrand.)

*Finar, L

L.—Organic Chemistry.

(Longmans.)

*Coulson, C.

A.—Valence.

(O.U.P.) (iii) For all students.

*Kolthoff, I. M.,

and

Sandell, E.

B.—Textbook of Quantitative Inorganic Analysis. (Macmillan.)

(c) Recommended for general reading and reference:

Emeléus, H. J.,

and

Anderson, J. S.

Modern Aspects of Inorganic Chemistry.

(2nd ed., Routledge.)

Moeller,

T'—Inorganic Chemistry.

(Wiley.) 83

Gould, E. S. Inorganic Reactions and Structure. (Holt.) Moelwyn-Hughes, E. A. Physical Chemistry. (Pergamon Press.)

Steiner, L. E.—Introduction to Chemical Thermodynamics. (2nd ed., McGraw- Hi11.)

Prigogine, I., and Defay, R: Chemical Thermodynamics. (Longmans.) Glasstone, S. Introduction to Electrochemistry. (Van Nostrand.) Findlay, A., Campbell, A. N., and Smith, N. O.—The Phase Rule Ø its

Applications. (9th ed., Dover.)

Findlay A., Campbell, A. N., and Smith, N. O.—The Phase Rule and its Longmans.)

Baker, J. W.-Electronic Theories of Organic Chemistry. (O.U.P.) Ketelaar, J. A. A.—Chemical Constitution. (2nd ed., Elsevier.) Hine, J —Physical Organic Chemistry. (McGraw-Hill.)

Reed, R. I., and Tucker, S. H.—Organic Chemistry, Electronic Theory and Reaction Mechanism. (Macmillan.)

ExAItNATIox. One 3-hour paper in Physical Chemistry and one 3-hour paper in Organic and Inorganic Chemistry. Students who have not maintained a satis- factory standard in the laboratory course throughout the year will be required to take a practical examination.