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Contact 36 hours Special requirements

External mode students must have access to the required computing and Internet facilities.

Description

The focus of this subject is on current research and developments in performance and competency based assessment strategies that can be applied within a range of contexts including schools, industry, higher education and vocational education. The subject explores current policy directions, as well as contemporary issues within the field, including grading, validity and reliability principles, quality assurance, reporting and the assessment of higher order competencies. Students will be exposed to a range of assessment purposes, evidence gathering procedures, interpretation frameworks, decision making strategies, as well as recording and reporting formats. Students will be given the opportunity to develop specialized, state of the art skills in the design, development and review of performance tasks and scoring rubrics suitable for use in applied settings.

Assessment

A report of 5,000 words (70 per cent) on the design, development, piloting and review of a performance or competency assessment procedure (the report should be written in a journal article format suitable for publication in an assessment or measurement journal); and a paper of 3,000 words, suitable for publication in a professional journal, evaluating aspects of current implementations of competency or performance

assessment (30 per cent).

Prescribed text

Griffin, P, Gillis S & Pigdon, K. (2001). PaRis: Performance Assessment and Reporting Instructional System CR-ROM, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne

476-664 ADVANCED MEASUREMENT AND PSYCIIOMETRICS Available in these courses MEd, MAssess&Eval, MTrng&Dvt Offered Parkville Campus, Semester 1

Staff Ray Adams , Margaret Wu Credit points 25

Contact 36 hours Special requirements

Advanced skills in assessment design and analysis, test equating and interpretation, and a high level of statistical and mathematical skills.

Description

This unit is intended to provide an advanced understanding of item response modelling. The subject examines item response theory from an advanced perspective, including the development of single and multiple parameter models, their specification, estimation and evaluation. It focuses on procedures for calibration and banking tasks based on rating and criterion referenced scales, constructed response and judgement-based assessments as well as multiple choice tasks. Computer applications of the models are extensively explored.

Subject Objective

To develop a familiarity with the estimation and application of advanced response theory models.

Generic Skills

On completion of this subject, students should be able to:

• understand the derivation of dichotomous and polytomous Rasch Models;

• apply the technique of simulation to explore item response modeling;

• analyse item response data with facets models;

• analyse multi-dimensional item response data;

• analyse item response data with collateral variables;

• estimate population characteristics from item response data;

• understand issues relating to equating, item banking and test design.

Assessment

Three papers totaling 8,000 words. Presentation of the papers (15 20 minutes) to class. 33 per cent to each paper and presentation.

Prescribed texts

Hambleton, R.K, Swaminathan, H., & Rogers, H.J. (1991) Fundamentals of Item Response Theory.

Newbury Park, California: Sage Publications.

476-675 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN DISABILITY AND EDUCATION This subject is not offered in 2005

Available in these courses DEd, MEd Offered Parkville Campus

Credit points 25 HECS-band 1 Staff

Contact 36 hours Description

This subject focusses on current issues related to the delivery of programs and services to persons with disabilities. Depending upon the student's area of specialisation, emphasis is placed on a study of persons with intellectual, physical, social-emotional, and/or learning disabilities. A number of selected reports, policy documents, theoretical writings, and practices in other parts of the world which may have

implications for local service delivery models and personnel training are studied. Students are expected to analyse and synthesise information in a selected area.

Assessment

Two written assignments of 4,000 words each (50 per cent each), or a paper of 8,000 words approved by the lecturer(s) based on a class presentation (100 per cent).

476-676 THEORIES AND RESEARCH IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT Available in these courses MEd, PGDipEdStud, PGCertEdStud Offered Parkville Campus, Semester 2

Credit points 25 IIECS-band 1 Staff Kay Margetts Contact 36 hours Description

This course provides a strong foundational base in the general research and theory of normal child development. Students also attain a practical understanding of children's emerging physical competencies and evolving comprehension of cognitive and social realities. The course includes in-depth examination of theoretical perspectives including Maturationist, Piagetian Cognitive Developmental Theory, and

Vygotskian Sociocultural Theory. Child-caregiver relations are explored from the perspective of Attachment Theory.

Assessment

One 4,000 word assignment or project (50 per cent); and a two-hour examination (50 per cent).

476-678 ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY AND ITS IMPACT ON EDUCATION This subject is not offered in 2005

Available in these courses DEd, MEd, MYHEM

Contact 36 hours Description

The major emphasis of the subject is on developmental theories of adolescence. Topics also deal with the adolescent in school in relation to biological change and sexual development, social and cognitive

development and psychological disturbances. The psychological impact of the home, the school and the peer group are considered. The stresses faced by adolescence are considered and in particular there is an emphasis on how young people can cope with stress.

Assessment

An essay, literature review or book review of 3,000 words (40 per cent); a case study of empirically based project report of 3,000 words (35 per cent) and a research paper of 2,000 words (25 per cent).

Prescribed texts

Heaven, P.C. (2001) The Social Pyschology of Adolescence. Melbourne: MacMillan.Frydenberg, E. (1997) Adolescent coping: Theoretical and Research Perspectives.London: Routledge.Feldman, S. & Elliott, G.

(1990) At the threshold: The Developing Adolscent. Harvard University Press.

476-679 APPLICATIONS OF EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY IN THE CLASSROOM This subject is not offered in 2005

Available in these courses MEd, PGDipEdStud, PGCertEdStud Offered Parkville Campus

Credit points 25 Staff John Munro Contact 36 hours Description

This subject identifies a range of issues in contemporary educational psychology, reviews and analyse them and identifies implications that they make for effective classroom practice. Issues include cognitive styles and preferences, memory storage and retrieval, locus of control, motivation, adjustment and contemporary psychoeducational assessment. Contemporary educational programmes and curriculum practices are analysed and evaluated in terms of this perspective and policy implications examined.

Assessment

An analytic examination of 2,500 words of a current issue in educational psychology and its practical implications for teaching (50 per cent); and a report of 2,500 words describing a research project examining a current issue in educational psychology in the classroom (50 per cent).

476-680 STRESS AND COPING IN EDUCATION: CHILDREN, PARENTS AND TEACHERS Available in these courses DEd, MEd, MYHEM

Offered Parkville Campus, Semester 2 Credit points 25

Staff Erica Frydenberg, Daryl Greaves Contact 36 hours

Description

A study of the recognition, symptoms and definition of stress and coping. Physiological mediation models and theory of stress and coping, e.g. cognitive, learning theory and sources of stress within education and other settings; effects of stress including teacher and administrator dysfunction, burnout, cardiac and other diseases. A major emphasis of the subject is the development of effective coping strategies. The role attitudes play in minimising or increasing stress are considered. Students compare and contrast common coping skills which children, parents and teachers can employ to manage their stress. The ways in which social support can be formalised in school settings as a buffer to stress are discussed. There is a focus on identifying ways in which organisations and administrators can reduce stress and the ways in which they can design curriculum initiatives to facilitate coping.

Assessment

A major assignment of 4,000 words and a research project of 4,000 words (50 per cent each), and an oral class presentation addressing the content of one of the two assignments (oral presentation constitutes 20 per cent of the assessment for that assignment).

Prescribed texts

Frydenberg, E. (1997) Adolscent coping: theoretical and research perspectives. London, Routledge Frydenberg, E. (2002) (Ed.) Beyond Coping: Meeting Goals, Vision and Challenges Oxford:Oxford University Press

476-681 ASSESSING INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN LEARNING This subject is not offered in 2005

Available in these courses MEd, PGDipEdStud, PGCertEdStud Offered Parkville Campus

Credit points 25 Staff John Munro Contact 36 hours Description

Individual differences in learning occur in all areas of human performance. This subject develops a model for the assessment of individual differences in learning by examining the assessment both of individual differences in learning outcomes in a range of areas and of the processes mediating these outcomes. The assessment model is references on an information-processing model for understanding individual differences in learning. Topics examined include: learner knowledge and management of the assessment process;

purposes for assessing individual differences in learning; different types of assessment formats and contexts, the information processing demands of each; the nature of the interaction between assessment tasks and learner knowledge; the assessment of individual differences in the processing, organising, storage and retrieval of information; the assessment of individual differences in learning outcomes; learner differences in the mechanisms through which knowledge is displayed; and the types of scaling models for describing individual differences in learning, the assumptions made by various scoring procedures used.

Assessment

A critical examination (8,000 words) of a current issue/topic in the assessment of individual differences in learning and its practical implications for teaching and education.

476-682 CURRENT ISSUES IN GIFTED EDUCATION This subject is not offered in 2005

Available in these courses DEd, MEd Offered Parkville Campus

Credit points 12.5 Staff John Munro Contact 36 hours Prerequisites

476-893 Foundation Studies in Gifted Education and 476-895 Developmental Psychology of Giftedness, or approved equivalents.

Description

This subject addresses topical issues, recent developments and emerging trends in gifted education. Delivery is in seminar format, and may include some specialist visiting lecturers when the opportunity presents. The content involves the analysis of current issues for theoretical, policy, organizational and curriculum implications. Possible topics include: the impact of new information technologies; new research in the

Assessment

One 2,000-word assignment (60 per cent) and one seminar paper equivalent to 1,000 words (40 per cent).

Prescribed text

Landvogt, J. (1998). Probing Deeper: Issues in Gifted Education. Melbourne: Hawker Brownlow Education.

476-683 CURRENT ISSUES LN VOCATIONAL PSYQIIOLOGY This subject is not offered in 2005

Available in these courses MEd, MTrng&Dvt Offered Parkville Campus

Credit points 25 Staff Esther Care Contact 36 hours