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A course of tutorials and essay work throughout the year together with occasional lectures.

Sиглвus. (i) Greek Prose Composition, including Historical Syntax.

(ii) Greek Literataгe.

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(iii) A Special Study-prescribed by the Professor. Each student will be encouraged to investigate some topic relevant to one of the above sections or some other topic of Classical History or Art. Students in the School of Classical Studies will undertake one special study on either a Greek or a Roman topic or one common to them both. Students in Combined Courses will be advised to choose a Greek or Roman topic which is relevant to their other main study. Each student must complete and hand in, on the first day of the third term, an essay of not more than 9,000•words on his special study.

(iv) Advanced translation at sight from Greek prose and verse authors.

(v) Early Greek Philosophy.

BoоKs. Recommended for reference :

Buck, C.

D.-Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin.

(Chicago U.P., 1933.) Buck, C.

D.—The Greek Dialects.

(2nd ed., Chicago U.P., 1955.)

Denniston, J.

D.—Greek Prose Style.

(2nd ed., O.U.P., 1952.)

Goodwin, W.

W.—Syntax of Greek Moods and Tenses.

(London, Macmillan, 1889.)

Humbert,

J.—Syntaxe grecque.

(2nd ed., Paris, Klincksieck, 1953.)

Kiżhner, R.,

and

Gerth, В

. Ausführliche Grammatik d. Griech. Spraсhe: 2.

Teil, Satalehre.

(3rd ed., Hanover and Leipzig, Hahnsche Buchhandlung, 1904.)

Nairn, J. A.—Greek Prose Composition. (C.U.P., 1927.)

Schwyzer, E.,

and

Debrunner,

A.—Griechische. Grammatik.

(Munchen, Beck, 1939-53.)

Ventris, M.,

and

Chadwick, J.—Documents in Мусепaеаn

Greek.

(C.U.P., 1956.)

For Greek Literature-

Bowra, C. M.—Greek Lyric Poetry. (0.U.P., 1936.)

Kitto, H. D.

F.—Greek Tragedy.

(2nd ed., London, Methuen, 1950.)

Rose, H.

J.—Handbook of Greek Literature.

(2nd ed., London, Methuen, 1942.

Murray, G. G. A., and others—Oxford

Book of Greek Verse.

(0.U.P., 1930.)) Mackail, J.

W.--Lectures on Greek Poetry.

(2nd ed., London, Methuen, 1926.

For Early Greek Philosophy—the books listed under Greek Part III.

EXAMINATION. Relevant papers of Part II of the Final Examination.

LATIN PART IV

A course of tutorials and essay work throughout the year together with occasional lectures.

SYLLAВus. (i) Latin Prose Composition, including Historical Syntax.

(ii) Latin Literature.

(iii) A Special Study prescribed by the Professor according to the.

plan set out under Greek Part IV.

(iv) Advanced translation at sight from Latin prose and verse authors.

(v) Imperial Rome.

Вooкs. Recommended for reference:

Buck, C.

D.—Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin.

(Chicago U.P., 1933.)

Bennett, C.

E.—Syntax of Early Latin.

(Boston, Allyn & Bacon, 1910-14.) Ernout, A., and Thomas,

E.—Syntaxe latine.

(2nd ed., Paris, Klincksieck, 1953.) Löfstedt,

E.—Syntactiсa.

(Lund, Gleerup, and O.U.P., Vol. I, 1933, Vol. II,

2nd ed., 1942.)

Marouzeau, J.—Traité

de stylistique appliqué

au

latin.

(2nd ed., Paris, Les Belles Lettres, 1946.)

Marouzeau,

3.—L'ordre des mots dans la phrase latine, volume coin plémen- taire.

(Paris, Les Belles Lettres, 1954.)

Nairn, J.

A.—Latin Prose

Composition. (C.U.P., 1926.)

For Roman Literature—

Beare,

W.—The Roman Stage.

(London, Methuen, 1950.)

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Duff, J. W., and Duff, A. M.—Literary History of Rome: I, In the Golden Age (2nd ed., 1953) ; II, In the Silver Age (2nd ed., 1959). (London, Unwin.)

Frank, T.—Life and Literature in the Roman Republic. (C.U.P., 1930.) . Mackail, J. W.—Latin Literature. (London, Murray, 1895.)

Rose, H. J.—Handbook of Latin Literature. (London, Methuen, 1936.) Rostagni, A.—Storia della letteratura latina, 2 vols. (Torino, 2nd ed., U.T.E.,

1954.)

Garrod, H. W.—Oxford Book of Latin Verse. (O.U.P., 1912.) Woodcock, E.

C.

—A New Latin Syntax. (Methuen, 1959.) For Imperial Rome—Books recommended in class.

EXAMINATION. Relevant papers of Part II of the Final Examination.

COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY This subj ect will be studied next in 1962.

B.

SCHOOL OF HISTORY

,

1. The Course for the Degree with Honours in the School of History com- prises the following subjects:

British History or Modern History A Ancient History Part I

General History Part I ( General History Part II Two of . General History Part III

l Ancient History Part II General History Part IV Theory and Method of History.

Candidates for the Degree with Honours must also take four additional subjects, including Part I or IA of a foreign language, and an approved major, in subjects other than those of the Department of History, selected from subjects of the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, Ordinary Degree.

Nomm. (a) Except with the permission of the Faculty, no candidate for Honours in School B may sit for examination without completing the essay work prescribed and attending tutorial classes in the subjects of the School.

(b) The Professor in charge of the Department of History may in special circumstances allow a change at the end of the first year in the supporting major so that the student completes the requirements with a sub-major in a different field.

2. These subjects must be taken in the following order, unless, because of special circumstances, the Faculty allows the order to be varied:

First Year: (a)British History (Ions.) or Modern History A (Ions.) (b) Ancient History Part I (Ions.).

(c) The first part of an approved major (Pass).

(d) Part I or IA of a language other than English.

Second Year : (a) General History Part I.

(b) Either General History Part II or Ancient History Part (c) The second part of an approved major (Pass).

Third Year: (a) Either General History Part II or Ancient History Part II or General History Part III.

(b) The third part of an approved major (Pass).

Fourth Year: (a) Theory аi.d Method of History.

(b) General History Part IV.

Comments:

(a) Students who have completed the First Year must be approved by the Faculty of Arts as candidates for the Degree with Honours before entering the Second Year of the Honour School. The Department of History will normally recommend such approval for candidates who have gained First or Second Class

Honours in Ancient History Part I and either British History or Modern History A.

Candidates who have failed to gain First or Second Class Honours in these subjects, but who wish to continue in the Honour School, should interview the Professor in charge, who will be guided in his recommendation by the merits of the case. Such students, if allowed to continue in the Нoпощr School, may be required to take special papers during their Second Year.

A student who has not attempted Honours in these subjects but who, at the end of the First Year, wishes to enter the Honour School, must make special application to the Faculty through the Sub-Dean for permission to do so. If such permission is granted, the. Faculty will prescribe what further work must be com- pleted before the student is allowedto proceed to the Final Examinations.

(b) Students may also be advised to attend other lecture courses which are regarded as relevant to their work.

Where the Head of a Language Department approves, some variation of the reading generally prescribed in that language may be made to suit the needs or interests of students of History.

(c) The Second and Third Years of the Honour course are regarded as form- ing a continuous whole. Candidates who, during their Second Year, have made satisfactory progress in the History subjects of this year, will be admitted to the Third Year of the School without formal examination in these subjects. Can- didates whose progress in these subjects during the first two terms is not for this purpose considered satisfactory will be notified during the third term that they must sit for an Annual Examination at the end of the Second Year.

(d) Students may not take the Australian History alternative in General History Part III or IV without having previously taken General History Part II.

(e) The Final Examination is divided into two parts.

Part I is taken at the end of the Third Year and counts equally with Part II towards the final result. Part I consists of one 3-hour paper in each of the follow- ing : a General Paper (see details of Theory and Method of History), General History Part I and two of Ancient History Part II, General History Part II and General History Part III. Part II of the Final Examination is taken at the end of the Fourth Year and consists of one 3-hour paper in each of Theory and Method of History and General History Part IV, together with an essay of not more than 9,000 words on an approved subject. The essay must be handed in not later than the first day of the second term of the Fourth Year. Students will be required to consult about subjects for the essay during the Third Year at times . which will be announced ; and work on the essay is expected to be begun during the long vacation. Members of staff will not be available for consultation about the essay during the examination period in November and December, nor in January unless they individually indicate otherwise.

Students who have satisfied. the examiners in Part I of the Final Examination and who are unable to proceed to the Fourth Year may, with the approval of the Faculty, be admitted to the Degree of Bachelor of Arts (Ordinary Degree).

(f) The following course has been approved for students who intend' to combine the School of History with a Law course:

First. Year: British History (Ions.).

Ancient History Part I (Ions.). ' , Introduction to Legal Method.

Part I of a foreign language.

Second Year: General History Part I General History Part II Legal History.

Criminal Law and Procedure.

Third Year: General History Part III Tort.

Principles of Contract.

Fourth Year: General History Part IV Theory and Method of History Principles of Property Fifth Year: As for Third Year Law.

Sixth Year: As for Fourth Year Law.

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BRITISH HISTORY

A course of lectures as for the Ordinary Degree, together with one additional lecture per week during two terms of the Academic Year.

SYLLABUS. As for British History in the Ordinary Degree, together with special study of the period of the Civil War and of the prescribed texts below.

Booxs. As-for the Ordinary Degree, together with the following:

(a) Prescribed text-books

:

Milton,

J-Areopagitica.

(World's Classics or Everyman.)

Bunyan,

J.-Grace

Abounding to the Chief of Sinners. (Everyman.) Bacon,

F.-Essays.

(Everyman.)

Clarendon, Earl of—Selections from the History of the Rebellion. (World's Classics.)

Woodhouse, A. S. P.—Puritanism and Liberty. (Macmillan.) The Centuries' Poetry—Donne to Dryden. (Penguin.)

Yule, G.—The Independents in the English Civil War. (M.U.P.) (b) Additional reading:

Newcastle, Duchess of-Life of the Duke of Newcastle. (Everyman.) Hutchinson,

L.—Memoirs

of Colonel Hutchinson. (Everyman.) Baxter,

R. Autobiography.

(Everyman.)

Aubrey, J.—Brief Lives. (Cresset Press.)

Fitzpatrick,

K.—The

Puritans and the Theatre. (Historical Studies, Australia and New Zealand, February, 1949.)

Bush,

D.—English

Literature in the Earlier Seventeenth Century. (O.U.P.) Wedgwood, C. V.-Seventeenth Century English Literature. (H.U.L.) Hill, C.—Economic Problems of the Church. (O.U.P.)

EXAMINATION. One 3-hour paper in addition to the paper for the Ordinary Degree.

MODERN HISTORY A

A course of lectures as for the Ordinary Degree, together with additional lectures, probably one per week during two terms of the Academic Year.

SYLLABUS. As for Modern History A in the Ordinary Degree, together with a special study of either the Portuguese or the Spanish colonial empires, 1490-1580.

Bоокs. As for the Ordinary Degree, with additions as notified on History Departmental Notice Boards.

EXAMINATION. One 3-hour paper in addition to the paper for the Ordinary.

Degree.

ANCIENT HISTORY PART I

A course of lectures and tutorials as for the Ordinary Degree, together with one additional lecture per week, throughout the year.

SvmAims. As for the Ordinary Degree, together with a study of Athenian Imperialism in the fifth century B.C., with special reference to the relationship between democracy and imperialism in Athens.

Booкs. (a) Recommended for preliminary reading

Burn, A. R.—Pericles and Athens. (Teach Yourself History.) Bury, J. B.—History of Greece, chs. VIII-XI. (Macmillan.)

(b) Prescribed text-books:

*Thucydides—History. (Everyman.)

*Plutarch—Lives. 3 vols. (Everyman.) (c) Recommended for reference:

Grundy, G.

B.—Thucydides

and the History of his Age. (Murray.) Gomme, A. W.—Commentary on Thucydides, vols. I and II. (Clarendon.)

Cornford,F. M.—Thucydides Mythistoricus. (Arnold.) Cambridge Ancient History, vol. V. (С.U.P.)

Botsford, G. W., and Sihler, E. G. Hellenic Civilization. (Columbia Univ.

Press.)

Freeman, Kathleen—Greek City States. (Macdonald.)

Hignett, C. History of the Athenian Constitution. (Clarendon.) Murray, G.—Aristophanes. (Clarendon.)

Thomson, G: Aeschylus and Athens. (Lawrence and Wishart.)

Meiggs, R.—The Growth of Athenian Imperialismin. (J. of Hellenic Studs., 1943.)

Hopper, R. J.—Interstate Juridicial Agreements in the Athenian Empire.

(J. of

Hellenic Studs., 1943.)

Jones, A. H. M.—The Economic Basis of the Athenian Democracy. (Past and Present, 1952.)

Jones, A. H. M.—The Athenian Democracy and its Critics.

(Camb. Hist. J.,

1953.)

de Ste. Croix, G. E. M.—The Character of the Athenian Empire. (Historia, 1954-55.)

Meritt, В. D., Wade-Gery, H. T., and McGregor, M. F.-The Athenian Tribute Lists. (Amer. School at Athens.)

EXAMINATION. One 3-hour paper in addition to the paper or papers for the Ordinary Degree.