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A course of four 2-hour periods per week, with practical work throughout the year. No correspondence courses are given.

SYLLABUS

A. General Social Psychology.

Scientific method applied to social behaviour. Observation of social behaviour.

Interviewing. The measurement of attitudes. Formation and change of attitudes.

Social surveys. Group dynamics. Leadership. Communication.

В. Social Psychology applied to Education.

Educational institutions and roles. Communication, motivation and social con- 175

FACULTY OF ARTS HANDBOOK

ditions for learning. Interpersonal relations and social adjustment. Sociometry in the classroom. Special problems of individual children in group situations.

C. Social Psychology applied to Industry.

Industrial institutions and roles. Problems of the transition to work. Principles and techniques in personnel selection. Motivation and morale. Job satisfaction. Social.

factors related to productivity and dissatisfaction at work.

PRACTICAL WORK

One hundred and fifty hours during the year on observational, survey and experimental methods and on fieldwork relating to the above course.

BOOKS Part A

Argyle, M.—The Scientific Study of Social Behaviour. (Methuen, 1957.) Cartwright, D., and Zander, A.—Group Dynamics. (2nd ed., Tavistock, 1960.) Eysenck, H. J.—The Psychology of Politics. ( Routledge, 1954.)

Lindzey, G. (ed. )—Handbook of Socłпl Psychology, Vol. I and II. (Addison- Wesley, 1954. )

Maccoby, E., Newcomb, T. M., and Hartley, E. L. ( eds. )—Readings in Social Psychology. ( 3rd ed., Methuen, 1959.)

Selltiz, C., Jahoda, Ivi., Deutsch, M., and Cook, S. W.-Research Methods in Social Relations. ( Holt, 1959.)

Part В

leser, O. A. (ed. )—Teaćher, Pupil and Task. (Tavistock, 1955.) Ottaway, A. K. C. .Education and Society. (Routledge, 1953.) Part C

Chiselli, E. E., and Brown, C. W.—Personnel and Industrial Psychology. (2nd ed., McGraw-Hill, 1955.)

Herzberg, et al.—Job Attitudes. (Psychological Service of Pittsburgh, 1957.) Lafitte, P.—Social Structure and Personality in the Factory. (Routledge, 1958.) Tiffin, J., and McCormick, E.

J.-Industrial

Psychology. (4th ed., Prentice-laU,

1958.)

Viteles, M. S.—Motivation and Morale in Industry. (Staples, 1954.) EXAMINATION

Two 3-hour papers. Candidates must submit satisfactory laboratory and field notebooks. Honours candidates will be expected to attain a higher standard through- out their course and in the examinations.

102. PSYCHOLOGY PART IIB (General Experimental Psychology) A course of four 2-hour sessions per week throughout the year.

SYLLABUS

The course provides training in some experimental techniques and theoretical foundations of psychology with special reference to perception, learning and thinking.

(a) Experimental work. The aim of the practical class is to familiarize students with present day techniques of threshold measurement and with a number of classical and contemporary experiments in this field. The experiments will range from demonstrations to independent work. Facilities for work with animal subjects are available.

(b) Lectures. The lectures will provide an introduction to standard material in the field of experimental, comparative and physiological psychology. Intend

-

ing students should consult a recognized text as an illustration of the content of the course.

178

Books

The main references for the course are:

•Hilgard, E.

K—Theories of Learning.

(2nd ed., Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1956.) Hilgard, E. R.,

and

Marquis, D.

G.—Conditioning and Learning.

(Revised ed.,

Methuen, 1961.)

Morgan, C. T., and Stellar,

E.—Physiological Psychology.

(McGraw-Hill, 1951.) Osgood, C.

E.—Method and Theory in Experimental Psychology. (O.U.P.,

1953.) Stevens, S.

5. Handbook of Experimental Psychology.

(Wiley, 1951.)

Wenger, M. A., Jones, and

Jones—Physiological Psychology.

(Holt, 1956.)

*Woodworth, R. S., and Schlosberg,

H. Experimental Psychology.

(Methuen, 1955.)

EXAMINATION

Two 3-hour paретs. Satisfactory laboratory notebooks must be submitted.

Honour candidates will be expected to attain a higher standard throughout the course and in the examinations.

105. PSYCHOPATHOLOGY

A Third Year course of two lectures and one tutorial class per week, together with practical work and discussion classes. No correspondence courses are given. No evening classes are held.

SYLLABUS

(Lectures, tutorials and discussion classes.) Introduction to theories of genesis of anxiety. Defence mechanisms and symptom formation. Clinical interviewing.

Classification of behaviour disorders. Learning theories and behaviour disorder.

Introduction to the theory and practice of clinical psychological procedures, and the professional functions of the clinical psychologist. The social importance of be- haviour disorder.

PRACTICAL WORK

For undergraduate students, one hundred and fifty hours on the practice of interviewing and psychological testing, including an elementary introduction to the projective techniques. At least one case-study

in extenso.

Students will be allocated to psychiatric clinics for part of their practical work, and will attend lecture-demon- strations at mental hospitals.

BooKS

Students will be expected to consult relevant sections of the following as they are referred to in class, and read journal references as they are given through- out the year. Essential references are marked with an asterisk, and are obligatory reading for this course.

Abt L. E., and Bellak, L. (eds.) —Projective Psychology. ( Grove Press, 1959. ) Anderson, H. H.,

and

Anderson, G. L. (eds.

)—Introduction to Projective Tech-

niques. ( Prentice-Hall,

1951.)

Bellak, L.,

and

Bellak, S.

S.-The T.А.Т. and

С.А.Т

. in Clinical Use.

(Grune &

Stratton, 1953.)

*Brenner, C.—An

Elementary Text Book of Psychoanalysis. (Doubleday,

1957.) Caplan, G. (ed.

)—Emotional Problems of Early Childhood. ( Basic

Books, 1955.) Dollard, J., and Miller, N. E.—Personality and Psychotherapy. ( McGraw-Hill,

1950.)

Erikson, E.

H.—Childhood and Society. ( Norton,

1950.)

Eysenck, H.

J.—Uses and Abuses of Psychology. ( Penguin,

1953.) Fenichel,

O. The Psychoanalytic Theory of Neurosis. (Norton,

1950.)

*Freud, A.—The

Ego and the Mechanisms of Defence. (Hoga

rt

h,

1937.) Freud,

S.—

Т

he Problem of Anxiety. ( Norton,

1936.)

*Freud,

S.—An Autobiographical Study. (Hogarth,

1949.)

*Freud,

S.—Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality.

(Imago, 1949. )

*Freud,

S.-The Psychopathology of Everyday Life.

(Pelican, 1939.) Freud, S.—An

Outline of Psychoanalysis.

(Hogarth, 1949.)

Hall, C. S.—A

Primer of Freudian Psychology.

(Mentor, 1955. ) Hall, C. S., and Lindzey,

G.—Theories of Personality.

(Wiley, 1957.)

*May, R. R.—The

Meaning of Anxiety.

(Ronald, 1950.) 177

FACULTY OF ARTS HANDBOOK

Meares. A.—The Medical Interview. (Charles C. Thomas, 1957.)

Mowrer, O. H.—Learning Theory and Personality Dynamics. (Ronald, 1950.) Mowrer, O. H. ( ed. )—Psychotherapy—Theory and Research. ( Ronald, 1953.) Pearson, G.—Emotional Disorders of Children. (G. Allen, 1957.)

Sarason, S. B. Psychological Problems in Mental Deficiency. (3rd ed., Harper, 1959.)

Schafer, R.—Psychoanalytic Interpretation in Rorschach Testing. Theory and Application. (

Grine

& Stratton, 1954.)

*Stafford-Clark, D.-Psychiatry Today. ( Pelican, 1952.) Sullivan, H. S.—The Psychiatric Interview. (Tavistock, 1955.) Watson, R. I.—The Clinical Method in Psychology. (Harper, 1951. )

Wechsler, D.-The Measurement and Appraisal of Adult Intelligence. (4th ed., Williams and Wilkins, 1958.)

EXAMINATION

Candidates must submit evidence of havim completed assignments set through- out the year. These may be assessed as part of ale examination for pass and honours.

Written examinations may be set throughout the year, and may replace one or both of the usual two 3-hour written examinations for pass and honours in November.

An oral and/or practical test may be given in any part of the year's work.

104. PSYCHOLOGY PART

IIIA

( Personality Organization )

A course of three lectures and one tutorial class per week, with eight hours' practical work per week, throughout the year. No correspondence courses are given.

SYLLABUS

This course extends further the work from Psychology part IIA in issues con- cerning personality and behaviour theory. Trait, role, phenomenological and depth approaches to personality theory. The status of psychological theories.

PRACTICAL WORK

Two hundred hours practical work during the year on experimental, assessment and observational methods relating to the above course. Particular reference will be given to experimental design and assessment procedures.

A minor research project on a psychological topic of the student's own choosing, on which at least fifty hours are to be spent.

BOOKS

(a ) Prescribed textbooks:

*Dreger, R. M.—Fundamentals

of

Personality. ( Lippincott, N.Y., 1962. )

*Нall, C.

S.

and Lindzey, G.—Theories of Personality. (Wiley, 1957.)

*Cronbach, L. J.—Essentials of Psychological Testing. (2nd ed., Harpers, 1960.)

*McNemar, Q -Psychological Statistics. (3rd ed. Wiley, 1962. )

or *Guilford, J. P.—Fundamental Statistics in Psychology and Education. (3rd ed., McGraw-Hill, 1956.)

Recommended reading will be referred to throughout the course.

EXAMINATION

Three 3-hour papers. Thesis. Satisfactory laboratory notebooks must be sub- mitted. Honour candidates will be required to show in both laboratory notebooks and in examination papers a wider and more detailed knowledge than pass candidates.

Note: Psychology part IIA is a pre-requisite for this subject.

HONOURS DEGREE

К.

SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY ( For possible combinations with this school see p. 220.)

1. The course for the degree with honours in the school of Psychology consists of ten subjects as follows:

(i) Psychology parts I, IIA, IIIA, IV.

(ii) Social Psychology, Psychology part IIB, Psychopathology.

178

(s) Any three First Year subjects as prescribed for the degree of bachelor of Arts or bachelor of Science.

The above-named subjects are to be taken in accordance with the details set out below and for the ordinary degree.

2. The subjects must be taken in the following order:

First Year: Psychology part I and the three subjects of (ш) above.

Second Year: Psychology part IIA, Social Psychology, Psychology part IIB.

Third Year: Psychology part IIIA, Psychopathology.

Fourth Year: Psychology part IV.

3. A candidate will be admitted to the Second Year if he has obtained honours in Psychology part

I

and has passed in the three subjects of para. 1 (ш) above.

A candidate will be admitted to the Third Year if he has passed in three Psychology subjects and has obtained honours in at least one of these and has passed the subjects of para. 1 ( iii) above.

A candidate will be admitted to the Final Year if he has passed in five Psychology obtained honours in at least two of these including Psychology part IIIA, and has passed in the subjects of para: 1 (iii) above.

4. An award of the degree with honours will be recommended if the student has passed in seven Psychology subjects and has obtained honours in four of these including Psychology part IIIA and Psychology part IV and has passed in the

subjects of para. 1 ( iii) above. .

5. Each subject is examined in the year in which it is taken.

6. The class list for final honours will take into consideration the results of all Psychology subjects.

7. Application must be made in writing to the sub-dean through the professor of Psychology for permission:

(i) to vary the requirements of section 1 (iii) such as by the inclusion of grade

Il

subjects or subjects of degree courses other than those prescribed;

(ii) to be credited with Psychology subjects passed in other universities.

8. A graduate who has the ordinary degree or a student who

is

proceeding to the ordinary degree may proceed to the honours degree by fulfilling those require- ments of paragraph 4 which he has not yet met, provided that a student who has passed Psychology part IIIA may not become a candidate for honours in Psychology part IIA or Psychology part I, or having passed Psychology part IIA may not become a candidate for honours in Psychology part

I.

However, students who have failed in Psychology part

IV

or passed in Psychology part IIIA or in the speciality subjects of section 1 (iii) may re-enter as candidates for honours in these subjects. In each such case, application to re-enter must be made in writing to the sub-dean through the professor of Psychology who will prescribe what further work is to be completed.

9. A student who is admitted to the Third Year and who at the end of that year (i) is admissible to the Final Year, or (ii) has passed in nine subjects, six of them Psychology of which he has been classed in at least two, may be recommended for admission to the ordinary degree if, on grounds acceptable to the faculty, he is

unable to proceed to the Final Year of the honours degree.

100. PSYCHOLOGY PART I (Ions)

A course of two lectures and one discussion class per week, together with practical work throughout the year.

SYLLABUS

As for the ordinary degree.

PRACTICAL WORK

As for the ordinary degree.

BOOKS

As prescribed for the ordinary degree together with the following reference:

Flugel, J. C.-A Hundred Years of Psychology. (2nd ed., Duckworth, 1951.) 179

FACULTY OF ARTS HANDBOOK EXAMINATION

Two 3-hour papers as for the ordinary degree. Candidates for honours will be expected to show a wider and more detailed knowledge than pass candidates in both the examination and the practical notebooks.

101. PSYCHOLOGY PART IIA (Ions)

A course of two lectures and one discussion class per week, together with practical work throughout the year.

SYLLABUS

As for the ordinary degree.

PRACTICAL WORK

As for the ordinary degree.

BOOKS

As prescribed for the ordinary degree.

EXAMINATION

Two 3-hour papers as for the ordinary degree. Candidates for honours will be expected to show a wider and more detailed knowledge than pass candidates in both the examination and the practical notebooks.

102. PSYCHOLOGY PART IIВ (Ions) A course of four 2-hour sessions per week throughout the year.

SYLLABUS

As for the ordinary degree.

BOOKS

As prescribed for the ordinary degree, with additional references issued during the year.

EXAMINATION

As for the ordinary degree. Honours candidates will be expected to attain a higher standard throughout the course and in the examination.

103. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (Ions) (General and Applied)

A course of four 2-hour periods per week, with practical work throughout the year.

SYLLABUS

As for the ordinary degree.

PRACTICAL WORK. As for the ordinary degree.

BOOKS

As prescribed for the ordinary degree, with additional references issued during the year.

EXAMINATION

Two 3-hour papers as for the ordinary degree. Candidates for honours will be expected to show a wider and more detailed knowledge than pass candidates in both the examination and the practical notebooks.

104. PSYCHOLOGY PART

IIIA (Ions)

A course of two lectures and one discussion class per week, together with practical work throughout the year.

One additional lecture discussion for honours students.

SYLLABUS

As for the ordinary degree together with a study of certain more advanced psychological topics.

180

PRACTICAL WORK. As for the ordinary degree.

BOOKS

As prescribed for the ordinary degree.

*Hunt, J.

McV.—Intelligence

and Experience. ( Ronald, 1961.) Additional references will be given during the year.

EXAMINATION

Three 3-hour papers. Candidates for honours will be expected to show a wider and more detailed knowledge than pass candidates in both the examination and the practical notebooks.

105. PSYCHOPATHOLOGY

(Ions)

A course of two lectures and one tutorial class per week, together with practical work throughout the year.

SYLLABUS

As for the ordinary degree.

PRACTICAL WORK. As for the ordinary degree.

BOOkS

As prescribed for the ordinary degree, with additional references.

EXAMINATION

As for the ordinary degree. Candidates for honours will be expected to show a wider and more detailed knowledge than pass candidates in both the examination and the practical work, especially in case studies.

160. PSYCHOLOGY PART IV

The Fourth Year of the honours course is devoted to four topics: generalized behaviour theory, measurement theory together with some advanced measurement techniques, research techniques, and discussion of specific research programmes.

Theoretical aspects are treated in seminars and work periods.

PRACTICAL WORK is continuous throughout the year.

EXAMINATION. Two 3-hour papers, or two essays, a thesis and an oral examination.

There are no evening classes. No correspondence course is given.

BOOКS

There are no prescribed texts. The more important references are given in the General Manual of the Department of Psychology. Others are provided for the various seminars. .

If part IV is taken as one of the requirements of a combined honours course (q.v.) the thesis should be in a field appropriate to the combination.

MASTER OF ARTS K. SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY

Candidates will prepare a thesis on an approved subject, and may be required to attend special research seminars.

Before the subject of the thesis is approved, candidates may be required to sit for an examination at honours standard covering the major fields of psychology. In addition, they may be required to attend special courses in the department of Psychology while being engaged on their thesis.

An entry form for examination for higher degrees must be sumitted to the Registrar.

. Theses must be submitted not later than 12 February, 1985.

Three copies of each thesis (quarto, typewritten, double-spaced) should be sub- mitted, one of which will be deposited in the University Library.

All candidates will be expected to pass an oral examination covering the general field of their research.

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