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Appendices

Appendix 1–4

Appendix 1:

Golden Bay Social Report 24

Executive Summary

Appendix 2:

Tasman District Coast Landscape

Character Assessment 30

Executive Summary

Appendix 3:

Water and Sanitary

Services Assessments 34

Key Information – Extracts

Appendix 4:

Development Location Options 49

Key Information

(2)

Appendix 1

Golden Bay Social Report

Executive Summary

(3)



            

 



 



            







               







           

          

        







         

            

       



               





            

           



          



             







           



           

           



             

         









(4)



             

            











        







 

            

           







          

          

        





 

          



         



 



 





             



     

          





           

 

(5)

         



              



           

           



            

        



          



 























 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



   

 

              

          

           

            





          















 

(6)

           



           

         

         







          









 

 

  

 



     

     

     

 

     

    

     



 





            

         

            



 

  



           



             



         



  

 

          

           

        

(7)









 







  

 







   

























       

   



         











          

          



        





 

 

 

 

 

(8)

Appendix 2

Tasman District Coast Landscape Character Assessment

Executive Summary

(9)

Tasman District Coastal Landscape Character Assessment Background Report – Boffa Miskell Ltd – August 2005

Executive Summary

All landscapes undergo continual change. In the coastal land areas of Tasman District, the rate of landscape change varies from the more benign changes in national parks – Kahurangi and Abel Tasman – to the rapid change associated with urban development – such as in Little Kaiteriteri.

The Tasman District Council has a community interest in seeking to avoid conflict between private and community aspirations where landscape change is likely and to moderate the nature, extent and effects of change. The Resource Management Act also requires councils to recognize and provide for, or have particular regard to, the preservation of the natural character of the District's coastal environment, protection of outstanding natural features and landscapes, maintenance or enhancement of amenity values, and of the quality of the

environment.

Recent and rapid change in the coastal environment has led Council to undertake a

comprehensive assessment of the District's coastal landscape in order to better inform decision making and to provide a basis for the formulation of appropriate and more strategic longer term landscape policy provisions within the TRMP.

In addition to identifying the distinctive characteristics of the coastal landscape, an important focus of the assessment was to determine what makes particular coastal areas in the Tasman District different from each other, rather than better or more scenic than each other. The assessment also acknowledged and sought to understand landscape change, its drivers and the vulnerabilities and threats to the existing landscape in order to provide guidance on how best to manage the character of the coastal landscape be it for protection, productivity, development, enhancement or rehabilitation.

While the TRMP defines and identifies the Coastal Environment Area as being a nominal 200

metre wide strip around the entire coast of the District, the inland boundary of the coastal

environment identified in the landscape character assessment extends considerably further

inland than the current 200 metre wide margin.

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Tasman District Coastal Landscape Character Assessment Background Report – Boffa Miskell Ltd – August 2005

Conclusions

The three coastal character areas of the Tasman District (Northwest Coast, Golden Bay and Tasman Bay) are quite separate and distinctive landscapes that display their own particular characteristics, features and values. These differences along with their respective key landscape characteristics should be retained and enhanced.

Within each of the three coastal character areas, there are identifiable coastal landscapes and within these more local area landscapes that also display particular characteristics and values that should be recognised and integrated within existing and ongoing management and development strategies.

The Northwest Coast has high landscape and natural character values, a low ability to

accommodate or absorb change and development, and while the area is relatively isolated, it is very vulnerable to subdivision and development.

While the Golden Bay character area also displays high landscape and natural character values, these characteristics are well integrated within the rural and cultural landscape.

The Golden Bay character area is considered to be the most threatened of the Tasman District’s coastal landscapes due largely to its location, its inherent landscape qualities and characteristics, which are clearly sought after attributes, and the higher likelihood of further and rapid

development.

While the Tasman Bay character area is the most diverse of the three coastal character areas and

displays a delicate balance between development, natural and cultural values, the area is

vulnerable to over development, particularly if the key landscape features and values of the area

are to be protected and managed.

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Tasman District Coastal Landscape Character Assessment Background Report – Boffa Miskell Ltd – August 2005

Recommendations

In landscape and resource management terms, the coastal environment area throughout the Tasman District should extend considerably further inland from the 200 metre margin presently identified in the TRMP.

The Northwest Coast of the District including Farewell Spit and the northern Golden Bay area (north of the Collingwood settlement) is worthy of consideration for classification as an outstanding natural landscape.

In addition to the coastal areas of Abel Tasman National Park, the Wainui area (east of Abel Tasman Point) and the Otuwhero/Marahau areas are also considered worthy of consideration for classification as an outstanding natural landscape.

In the context of the Golden Bay character area, the Parapara coastal area (Milnthorpe to Rangihaeata Head) has the potential to become the focus for future growth in the wider Golden Bay area.

All other growth and development in the Golden Bay area should be confined to the existing settlements of Puponga, Pakawau/Seaford, Collingwood, Takaka and the Pohara/Tata Beach areas.

In the Tasman Bay character area, urban growth and development should be confined to the existing settlements at Richmond, Mapua, Motueka and the Kaiteriteri area.

The existing Rural 3 zoned areas should be the focus for rural residential and lifestyle

developments in the Tasman Bay area.

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Appendix 3

Water and Sanitary Services Assessments

Key Information – Extracts

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Tasman District Council Water & Sanitary Services Assessments

Table 4-2 Assessment of Adequacy of Capacity of Council Owned Water Supplies

1 2 3 4 5

Community Is there enough water for the

scheme?

Is the reticulation robust enough?

Is water use sensible?

Is the water quality adequate?

Is it adequate for fire fighting?

Urban Water Supply Schemes

Waimea

Richmond

Brightwater/Hope

Wakefield

Mapua/Ruby Bay

Tapawera

Murchison

Kaiteriteri/Riwaka

Collingwood

Upper Takaka

Rural Water Supply Schemes

88 Valley N/A

Redwoods N/A

Dovedale N/A

Community Water Supply Schemes

Motueka

Pohara Valley

Hamama N/A

Torrent Bay

Note: Rural water schemes do not provide for fire fighting capability. As a minimum, individual rural

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Tasman District Council Water & Sanitary Services Assessments

Drinking Water Standards

As discussed in sections 4.1.1 and 4.1.2, the Drinking Water Standard for New Zealand (DWSNZ) define the standards that should be met by water supply systems and compliance with the standards may become mandatory through the proposed Public Health (Drinking Water) Amendment Bill. In order to comply with DWSNZ, most of Council’s treatment systems will need to be upgraded. This is because most groundwater sources and all surface water sources in the District are likely to be classed as “unsecure” under the proposed DWSNZ 2005. The risk of contamination is considered higher in an unsecure source and disinfection by either chlorination or UV alone is not considered sufficient to address this risk. Some form of filtration or coagulation/sedimentation process will be needed to remove suspended solids.

A brief assessment of the minimum upgrade needs to meet DWSNZ 2005 requirements is shown in Table 4-3.

This list should be taken as a guide only. Each site will need specific inspection, sampling, analysis and engineering assessment to fully identify upgrade requirements.

Table 4-3 Drinking Water Treatment Upgrades for DWSNZ 2005

Scheme Current Treatment Source

Security

Expected Treatment Upgrades Urban Water Supply

Schemes

Waimea Lime injection to adjust pH;

gas chlorination

unsecure

Richmond None secure

Mix both sources to dilute nitrates/neutralise pH; filtration;

UV disinfection; chlorination Brightwater/Hope Gas chlorination unsecure pH adjustment; filtration; UV

disinfection; chlorination Wakefield Aeration to release CO

2

and

increase pH; gas chlorination

unsecure Filtration; UV disinfection;

chlorination

Mapua/Ruby Bay Same as Waimea unsecure Source moved to Motueka;

treatment same as Motueka Tapawera Gas chlorination; lime dosing

for pH correction

unsecure Upgrade lime dosing system;

filtration; UV disinfection;

chlorination

Murchison Aeration; gas chlorination unsecure Filtration; UV disinfection;

chlorination

Kaiteriteri/Riwaka None unsecure Same as Motueka

Collingwood Aeration; dolomite chip pH adjustment; chlorine gas injection;

unsecure Filtration; UV disinfection;

chlorination Upper Takaka Filtration (50 micron); UV

disinfection

unsecure Filtration; UV disinfection

upgrade; chlorination

Rural Water Supply

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Tasman District Council Water & Sanitary Services Assessments

Scheme Current Treatment Source

Security

Expected Treatment Upgrades Dovedale Gas chlorinator unsecure Filtration; UV disinfection;

chlorination unless new source commissioned

Community Water Supply Schemes

Motueka None unsecure pH adjustment required

Pohara Valley Gas chlorination; sand filter unsecure Filtration; UV disinfection;

chlorination

Hamama None unsecure Filtration and UV disinfection at

households

Torrent Bay None unsecure Filtration; UV disinfection;

chlorination Water Use and/or Leakage

A common problem in the Tasman District is leakage in many towns and rural areas. This has a large impact on the sustainability of the water supply and Council needs to be proactive in monitoring and dealing with unaccountable water losses.

4.5.4

Options

It is noted that in the Council’s Water Activity Management Plan, there are many improvements listed to upgrade the Council systems. They are not reproduced in detail here, however, it is noted that they include:

• Construction of a new water treatment plant to treat Richmond and Waimea waters

• Construction of new water sources for Dovedale Rural water supply

• Construction of better linkage systems between the Waimea scheme

• Construction of a number of new storage reservoirs

• Upgrade trunk mains between the Waimea Basin schemes

• The development of Public Health Risk Management Plans Further options to improve Council water supplies:

Waimea Basin Water Strategy:

Prepare a comprehensive strategy to look at the current performance and future issues of all Waimea Basin Schemes. Detailed population projections and demand forecasts should be prepared and evaluated so that assessments can be made of supply shortfalls, new water sources and opportunities to re-distribute existing allocations.

Water Source Review and Treatment Gap Analysis:

Detailed investigation of all Council water sources in the District in terms of the proposed DWSNZ 2005 requirements should be performed to confirm the security of each. Then refine current treatment methods and upgrades needed to meet DWSNZ 2005.

Water Demand Management and Leakage Study:

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Tasman District Council Water & Sanitary Services Assessments

4.6 Communities without Council Water Supplies

4.6.1

Overview

There are a number of communities in Tasman District that do not have a Council owned water supply and some of these are quite large. Motueka and Takaka for example are substantial towns, yet they are not fully serviced by a Council water supply.

These towns have been able to remain unrserviced because of the presence of very good aquifers under the towns. Every property is able to pump water directly from the aquifer into their houses. However, it is not so easy everywhere in the District.

Where there are good aquifers available, groundwater is the preferred source of water, but many coastal areas and inland or hill country areas do not have access to suitable groundwater. These communities therefore source their water from rainwater or from nearby surface water (streams and creeks). Some small, private, reticulated water supply schemes serve a number of properties.

The areas are identified as communities that do not have Council water supplies are shown in Table 4-4.

Table 4-4 Communities Without a Council Water Supply

Community What is the source of water? Is there any treatment of the water?

Approximately how many properties are in

the community?

Braeburn/Harakeke Mixture of groundwater and rain water No 86 Brooklyn There is a small private reticulation

scheme that extracts from groundwater

No 200

Ligar Bay Mostly rain water, with a small

reticulation scheme that serves several houses and extracts from a creek.

No 45

Lower Moutere The Lower Moutere Irrigation Scheme serves most houses from a groundwater source

No 131

Marahau/Sandy Bay

Groundwater, rainwater with a small reticulation scheme that serves several houses and extracts from a creek.

No 103

Motueka

5

Groundwater No 2700

Pakawau Mixture of groundwater, surface water and rain water

No 46

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Tasman District Council Water & Sanitary Services Assessments

Community What is the source of water? Is there any treatment of the water?

Approximately how many properties are in the community?

Puponga Rain water No 15

Rangihaeata Rain water No 39

Riwaka

6

Rain water; shallow bores and wells No 156

Rotoroa Rain water No 47

St Arnaud Rain water and DOC have a small system that abstracts from Lake Rotoiti

No 317

Tadmor Rain water No 20

Takaka Groundwater No 320

Tasman/Kina Rain water, with some reported use of shallow wells

No 64

Tata Beach Rain water and there are said to be some houses that are able to abstract

groundwater

No 195

Toko Ngawa Rain water No 69

Tukurua Rainwater with a small reticulation scheme that serves several houses and extracts from a creek.

No 30 plus camp

ground (800people at peak summer

season)

Upper Moutere Mixture of groundwater and rain water No 53

4.6.2

Adequacy of Water Supply in Communities without Council Water Supplies

The adequacy of the water supplies in these communities will depend on:

1. Does the water source yield reliably produce enough water for the community?

Rating Description of Assessment

Source considered to have ample capacity

Source marginal

Source unreliable, during drought times properties run out of water and have to

undertake measures such as tankering it in

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Tasman District Council Water & Sanitary Services Assessments

Table 4-5 Adequacy of Non-Council Owned Community Water Supplies

1 2 3 4

Community Water Source How reliable is the water

source?

How robust is the reticulation

system (if there)?

Is the water quality adequate?

Fire Fighting Capacity

Groundwater No retic

Braeburn/Harakeke

Rain water No retic

Brooklyn Groundwater

Graham Downs Community

Surface water No retic

Rain water No retic

Ligar Bay

Surface water

Lower Moutere Groundwater

Groundwater ?

Rain water No retic

Marahau/Sandy Bay

Surface water

Motueka Groundwater No retic

Groundwater No retic

Rain water No retic

Pakawau (including Totra Avenue and Waikato Inlet)

Surface water

Groundwater

Parapara

Rain water No retic

Groundwater No retic

Patons Rock

Rain water No retic

Pohara (excluding Pohara Valley)

Rain water No retic

Puponga Rain water No retic

Rangihaeata Rain water No retic

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Tasman District Council Water & Sanitary Services Assessments

1 2 3 4

Community Water Source How reliable is the water source?

How robust is the reticulation

system (if there)?

Is the water quality adequate?

Fire Fighting Capacity

Rain water No retic

St Arnaud

Surface Water

Tadmor Rain water No retic

Takaka Groundwater No retic

Groundwater No retic

Tasman/Kina

Rain water No retic

Rain water No retic

Tata Beach

Groundwater No retic

Toko Ngawa Rain water No retic

Tui Community Rain water

Surface water No retic

Rain water No retic

Tukurua

Surface water

Groundwater No retic

Upper Moutere

7

Rain water No retic

4.6.3

Priority Rankings

Based on the above assessments, a priority ranking has been determined for each community as a whole, taking into account all of the listed water sources for each community and considering general water availability and reliability of supply, the quality of the water that is available and fire fighting capability. It is aimed at prioritising which communities most need to improve their water supplies to comply with proposed DWSNZ 2005 and to provide fire fighting capacity where required. This priority ranking is shown in Table 4-6 and Figure 4-2 and described below.

Priority 1: The community that is considered to be the highest priority for an improved water supply is Motueka. This is because of its size and the public health risks that this raised and the lack of adequate fire fighting provisions.

The Priority 2 communities are those where the sources of water in the immediate area are unlikely to be of

sufficient quality or quantity to meet the needs of the community. Additionally, there are considered to be

public health risks from the water supplies that need to be addressed.

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Tasman District Council Water & Sanitary Services Assessments

Rating Description of Assessment-Reticulation Adequacy

Removes all wastewater flows without overflows; can accommodate planned development

Generally removes wastewater flows without overflows, but overflows occur in some specific, known locations; can not fully accommodate planned development

System overflows frequently in heavy rainfall, often in several locations; can not accommodate planned development

2. treat and dispose of the wastewater into the environment in a manner that meets environmental compliance criteria; that minimises the risk to public health; and that minimises the impact on the environment. We shall call this “Treatment and Disposal Adequacy”

Rating Description of Assessment-Treatment and Disposal Adequacy

System treats and disposes of wastewater adequately, meeting resource consent requirements; low risk to environment and/or public health

System treats and disposes of wastewater adequately most of the time, but may breach consent at times (peak holiday loading or extreme wet weather) and/or may need some upgrades to address some problems

System performs poorly and needs an upgrade to meet resource consents

Each Council owned scheme has been assessed against each of these criteria and given a rating as follows:

A summary of the adequacy of the existing Council owned wastewater systems is displayed in Table 5-2.

Table 5-2 Adequacy of Existing Council Owned Wastewater Systems Reticulation

Adequacy

Treatment and Disposal Adequacy Township

Present (2005) Future (2025) Present (2005) Future (2025)

Richmond

Brightwater/Hope

Wakefield

Mapua/Ruby Bay

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Tasman District Council Water & Sanitary Services Assessments

Reticulation Adequacy

Treatment and Disposal Adequacy Township

Present (2005) Future (2025) Present (2005) Future (2025)

Motueka

Kaiteriteri/Riwaka

Takaka

Pohara to Tata Beach

Collingwood

Upper Takaka

Table 5-2 shows that while the Council owned systems cover many communities in the District, there are some inherent problems that require addressing. These are discussed in the next section.

5.5.3

Key Issues

The key issues that have lead to an “inadequate” assessment are discussed as follows:

• High Wet Weather Flows:

During wet weather, surface water can find its way into wastewater systems through flooded manholes, pump stations, low gully traps, illegal roof drainage connections and yard sump connections etc. This is called stormwater inflow. Groundwater can also find its way into wastewater systems through pipe and manhole defects and breaks. This is called groundwater infiltration. The combined effect of inflow and infiltration can lead to significant wet weather flows in sewers, and at worst can cause system overflows.

Many wastewater systems in Tasman suffer from high inflow/infiltration. This is because:

- many systems have been constructed in flat areas where surface flooding occurs frequently during wet weather events (e.g. Takaka and Motueka)

- some systems have been constructed to a poor standard (e.g. Takaka), because some materials used have been found to be inadequate for the application

- a combination of infrastructure age and condition has reduced their performance (e.g. rubber rings in Richmond, concrete and earthenware pipes in Motueka and Richmond).

Inflow and infiltration arises in both Council owned mains and private drains. The contribution from private drains can be significant because they are on private property and are not always noticed or repaired in a timely fashion.

• Insufficient Capacity to Convey Future Flows:

In some cases, population growth within some catchments has exceeded original design expectations and the existing systems are undersized to convey the current wastewater flows (notwithstanding high wet weather flow loads that may also apply).

• Pumping System Deficiencies:

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Tasman District Council Water & Sanitary Services Assessments

Table 5-3 Summary of Council System Upgrades Planned

Community Summary of Upgrades Timeframe

Richmond In the short term the Council is planning to construct a trunk main to relieve sewage overflows in the Hunt Street area, and model the system to assess any further system incapacities.

As a longer term continuing activity, Council will be looking to identify and remove sources of inflow and infiltration and remove further system in-capacities that are found through hydraulic modelling.

1-2 years

Continuous

Brightwater/Hope In the short term Council is looking to construct storage at the Bryants Road pump station to reduce an overflow problem in this area.

Longer term the Council is planning to increase the trunk main capacity to cater for expected growth in the area.

1-2 years

1-5 years Wakefield Longer term the Council is planning to increase the trunk main

capacity to cater for expected growth in the area.

1-5 years Mapua/Ruby Bay In the short term Council is planning to upgrade pump stations and

replace the pumping main from Bells Island to Mapua.

In the long term, Council is studying the feasibility and implementation of a significant expansion of the wastewater system into the Tasman area.

1-10 years

Tapawera Council is planning to upgrade the land disposal system and renew the resource consent for the plant

1-5 years Murchison Council is planning to upgrade the treatment plant and land disposal

system to provide additional capacity and to improve system performance

1-5 years

St Arnaud This system is operating well and no upgrades are planned in the timeframe of the Activity Management Plan

None planned Motueka Council is planning to upgrade the treatment plant and land disposal

system to provide improved system performance. Overall system capacity will be reviewed in conjunction with Kaiteriteri/Riwaka evaluation.

As a longer term continuing activity, Council will be looking to identify and remove sources of inflow and infiltration and remove further system in-capacities that are found through modelling.

1-5 years

Continuous

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Tasman District Council Water & Sanitary Services Assessments

Community Summary of Upgrades Timeframe

Takaka Council is planning to significantly upgrade the pumping system to improve capacity and reduce pipe breakages.

As a longer term continuing activity, Council will be looking to identify and remove sources of inflow and infiltration.

Council is also planning an upgrade to the WWTP to ensure better performance and consent compliance.

1-10 years

Continuous

1-2 years Pohara to Tata Beach Council is planning to significantly upgrade the pumping system to

improve capacity and reduce pipe breakages.

1-5 years Collingwood Council has completed a partial upgrade to the plant to install UV

disinfection. Further upgrades including the addition of aeration, inlet screen and a dissolved oxygen probe are planned.

1-2 years

Upper Takaka Council is planning minor improvements to the WWTP. 1-5 years Bells Island NRSBU has completed several major improvements to the WWTP

including a new treatment stage, more efficient configuring of an existing clarifier, construction of new grit removal facilities.

NRSBU further plans some trunk main capacity upgrades.

Now complete

5-10 years It is concluded that the planned series of upgrades is comprehensive and addresses the main inadequacies that the assessments have identified.

5.6 Privately Owned Wastewater Systems and Non-Reticulated Areas

5.6.1

Overview

The provision of wastewater services within the District is quite comprehensive. Most urban areas of any size within the District have a Council reticulation and disposal system. However, most rural areas within the District, which includes some reasonably sized communities, rely on private on-site disposal methods. There are no privately owned wastewater schemes in the District that serve residential dwellings.

The success of the on-site disposal methods is variable across the District. There is, however, a developing understanding within the Council that an unacceptably high number of on-site disposal systems are performing poorly. Reasons for this are many, but the main causes include:

• Insufficient maintenance of the septic tanks and disposal systems,

• Inadequate capacity of the septic tanks and disposal systems, and

• Inadequate disposal systems being used in soils with poor drainage properties.

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Tasman District Council Water & Sanitary Services Assessments

• Population density: is the population of a size and density that may make it difficult for on- site disposal systems to operate effectively

• Suitability of soils: is the area’s geology suitable to land disposal, for example are there free-draining soils for disposal trenches, or poor draining clays and are they on flat or steep slopes

• Knowledge of performance: what knowledge is there of the performance of the communities on-site systems

• Risk to Water supply: is there a risk that the water supply to the community or individual supplies may be contaminated by poorly performing on-site disposal systems

• Risk to/from stormwater: is there a risk that the disposal field will be in-undated and thus create a public health risk, or is there a risk that poorly performing disposal systems will lead to run-off into a waterway

Each community has been assessed against each of these criteria and given a rating as follows:

Rating Description of Assessment

Good for on-site disposal schemes, or low risk to environment and/or public health, or low consequence of failure

Medium for on-site disposal schemes, or risk to environment and/or public health, or insufficient information is known

Poor for on-site disposal schemes, or high risk to environment and/or public health, or high consequence of failure

? Insufficient information is known

Table 5-4 Adequacy of Tasman Communities On-site Disposal Systems Community Consequence

of Failure

Population Density

Suitability of Soils

Knowledge of performance

Risk to Water supply

Risk to/from stormwater

Awaroa

Anchorage

Bark Bay

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Tasman District Council Water & Sanitary Services Assessments

Community Consequence of Failure

Population Density

Suitability of Soils

Knowledge of performance

Risk to Water supply

Risk to/from stormwater Marahau/

Sandy Bay

Pakawau

Parapara

Patons Rock

Puponga

Quinneys Bush (Motupiko)

Rangihaeata

Rotoroa

Tadmor

Tasman/Kina

Toko Ngawa ?

Torrent Bay

Totaranui

Tukurua

Upper

Moutere

Based on the above assessments, a priority ranking has been determined, taking into account the

consequence of failure (column 1) and the factors that contribute to the likelihood of failure (columns 2 to 6).

The priority rankings are shown in Table 5-5 and Figure 5-1.

5.6.3

Priority Rankings

The Priority 1 communities are those where on-site systems are unlikely to work well. Therefore some form of centralised treatment and disposal should be considered by the communities.

Priority 2 Communities are generally those where parts of the communities are on soils that are not good for on-site disposal.

Most Priority 3 communities are in or around National Parks.

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Tasman District Council Water & Sanitary Services Assessments

Table 5-5 Priority Ranking for Tasman District Communities Wastewater Systems Priority Categories Community

Priority 1 Marahau/Sandy Bay, Tasman/Kina, Pakawau Priority 2 Parapara, Tukurua, Patons Rock, Upper Moutere

Priority 3 Anchorage, Awaroa, Bark Bay, Rotoroa, Torrent Bay, Totaranui Priority 4 Bests Island, Brooklyn, Lower Moutere, Puponga, Rangihaeata,

Quinneys Bush Camp, Tadmor, Toko Ngawa

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Appendix 4

Development Location Options

The following table summarises the key features of each development location in terms of key issues:

Rural land productivity, geology and hydrology, transport links and distances to services, landscape, service infrastructure and urban consolidation.

It is similar to the table contained in the Phase I discussion document, but uses up-dated information and feedback from community consultation and landowner discussions.

The shading of each box indicates relative importance of the issue, as follows.

Regarding this location option, the issue may represent a significant constraint to development, depending on how much weight is given to it and how carefully it is managed

Regarding this location option, the issue may require more in-depth assessment and/or be a limitation to the density or form of developm

Figure

Table 4-2 Assessment of Adequacy of Capacity of Council Owned Water Supplies
Table 4-3 Drinking Water Treatment Upgrades for DWSNZ 2005
Table 4-4 Communities Without a Council Water Supply
Table 4-5 Adequacy of Non-Council Owned Community Water Supplies
+6

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