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P ART II A PPENDIX 3: C OASTAL T ASMAN A REA

S UBDIVISION AND D EVELOPMENT

D ESIGN G UIDE

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NTRODUCTION 1.1 Introduction

The Coastal Tasman Area Subdivision and Development Design Guide (‘the Design Guide’) has been developed by Council to guide subdivision and land development in the coastal Tasman area, from Mariri in the north to Waimea Inlet in the south. Planning Map 169 shows the extent of the coastal Tasman area and the landscape units within the area. The Rural 3 Zone covers most of the coastal Tasman area and is shown on Zone Maps 19 and 22.

The Design Guide will guide subdivision and development in the Rural 3 Zone of the Tasman Resource Management Plan (TRMP).

The Guide will help land developers in designing subdivisions and/or new buildings, which will minimise adverse environmental effects on rural land in the Rural 3 Zone.

The Rural 3 Zone comprises a substantial proportion of land which has productive land values, and rural and coastal amenity, character and landscape values. It also comprises land which is located in close proximity to main urban centres such as Richmond, Motueka and Mapua, major transport routes and the coast, and has high amenity values. This means it has come under increasing pressure for residential development.

In this Zone subdivision and development will be evaluated in terms of matters such as rural and coastal amenity, character and landscape values, productive land, and the availability of appropriate infrastructure and services.

This Guide does not seek to impose additional rules beyond those already in the Plan. It provides a set of guidelines to inform and guide landowners, developers, potentially affected people and the wider community about rural development expectations in the Rural 3 Zone.

In all other zones within the coastal Tasman area, it is for the purpose of encouraging good design. In this role, it is a non-regulatory “education and advocacy” document that can encourage developers and landowners to achieve good design outcomes.

1.2 Purpose

The Guide has been developed to promote and encourage well-designed and innovative developments in the Rural 3 Zone, which will retain the overall rural and coastal values and on-going opportunities to utilise land of high productive value.

The Guide serves as a method to implement the objectives and policies of the TRMP. It is intended to assist applicants in designing subdivision and development proposals that are consistent with the objectives and policies. It is also intended to provide clear and concise guidelines to landowners, developers and the community for the subdivision and development of land in the Rural 3 Zone.

In all other Zones within the coastal Tasman area, the Guide has a non-regulatory effect, encouraging and advocating the principles contained within it.

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Figure 1 – Cluster Subdivision Concept and Landscape Sensitive Design

1.3 Links to TRMP

There are a number of objectives and policies in the TRMP which are relevant to subdivision and development in the Rural 3 Zone. By using the Design Guide in the design of subdivision and development, consistency with these objectives and policies can be achieved.

The policies that are most relevant to development in the Rural 3 Zone are contained within Section 7.3A of the TRMP. These policies articulate what it is that Council seeks for the Coastal Tasman Area. The policies relate to the more general objectives of the rural issues section (Chapter 7). They also relate back to landscape objectives and policies (Section 9.2). Site amenity objectives and policies of Chapter 5 and the objectives contained in Chapter 8 ‘Margins of Rivers, Lakes, Wetlands and the Coast’ are also relevant In addition to land management, domestic wastewater management is something that must be addressed in the Rural 3 Zone. The objectives and policies in Chapter 33 ‘Discharges to Land and Fresh Water’ tell us what Council’s expectations are for on-site domestic wastewater and stormwater management. The Guide encourages an integrated design approach to both ‘land’ and ‘water’ sections of the Plan.

Consistency with this Design Guide can help to ensure that all of these objectives and policies are met.

Consistency with the Design Guide is one of the assessment criteria for subdivision and land use consents in the Rural 3 Zone.

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1.4 Using the Design Guide

The Guide should be used to guide the preparation of consent applications for any subdivision and land development proposal in the coastal Tasman area, particularly the Rural 3 Zone. It is expected that the following guidelines will enable the objectives and policies to be met.

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There are three key sections in this guide. They are the:

A. Process (Chapter 2). This is the “how to” part of the Design Guide, setting out a course of action that can achieve good design outcomes. Follow this process for good design outcomes.

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B. Guidelines (Chapter 3). This section can help applicants to achieve the policies and objectives of the TRMP. This section sets out more specific guidance about possible design methods and practical solutions.

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C. Location-Specific Guidelines (Chapter 4). These advisory notes are very specific to landscape matters in particular locations, providing a baseline for landscape assessments.

These location-specific matters will provide more detail about appropriate landscape sensitive design.

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For all Rural 3 subdivisions and development proposals, Council is interested in the applicant demonstrating consistency with the Design Guide in the following ways:

1. Consistency with the process in Chapter 2. Good process can reduce time, effort and cost for applicants and Council, and ultimately result in better subdivision design outcomes. Council will take into account the size and scale of the proposed development and the particular attributes of the site when applying the test of consistency against the process of Chapter 2.

2. Consistency with the guidelines in Chapter 3. The guidelines provide specific guidance on particular design matters. Achieving the guidelines can ensure that the objectives and policies of the TRMP are met.

The location specific guidelines in Chapter 4 provide more detail about how landscape guidelines can be met in specific locations. They should be used to identify appropriate subdivision and development options in terms of landscape objectives and policies of the TRMP.

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ROCESS

2.1 Why define a process?

Historically, subdivision design methods have focused on maximising allotment yield based on a minimum allotment size and key subdivision standards. The design process intended for development in the Rural 3 Zone and this Design Guide differs somewhat from this approach.

Figure 2 – Conventional versus Low Impact Subdivision Designs In the Rural 3 Zone “Discretionary Activity” (Restricted) subdivision outcomes are intended to be the product of in-depth site assessments of key matters like productive values, landscape character and amenity values and wastewater disposal constraints. By overlaying all of the assessment information, development constraints and opportunities can be determined.

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Only after this process can subdivision and development opportunities be designed. In some cases, especially where the subject land area is small, there may be no subdivision opportunity.

To ensure that the best possible outcomes can be achieved in every subdivision, a design process has been developed to guide applicants in preparing and designing subdivisions and/or developments. By following the process, applicants will find it easier and will be more likely to achieve the guidelines in this Guide.

Consistency with the process will be considered as part of the assessment of a subdivision. However, in so doing, Council does recognise that each subdivision and set of circumstances will be unique, and that there is more than one way that the guidelines may be followed.

2.2 Process Steps

2.2.1 Research

(a) Read the Design Guide, including all of the guidelines and location-specific guidelines.

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(b) Identify consent requirements, including subdivision, land use (for dwellings) and wastewater discharge consents.

Conventional Subdivision Low Impact Subdivision

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(c) Visit the site and locality, and become familiar with it in the context of the Design Guide.

2.2.2 Communicate and consult

(a) Discuss development ideas with Council staff, neighbours and other potentially effected parties early in the design process.

2.2.3 Gather information and research

(a) Use the guidelines of this Design Guide as a checklist for collecting the right kind of information, and to determine which topics may require further research and investigation. In particular, ensure that the following information requirements have been identified, recorded and mapped:

(i) Landscape, character, productive land uses and amenity attributes of the site and the surrounding landscape, such as topographic features, coastal features, rural amenity values and vegetation patterns. Include any attributes that are addressed in the location specific guidelines of the Design Guide (Chapter 4).

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(ii) Drainage features of the site and surrounding landscape, including surface water bodies, flood risk areas, topographical drainage patterns and coastal margins.

(iii) Social-cultural attributes, such as existing buildings, current and historic land uses, wāhi tapu, and archaeological sites.

(iv) Productive land values of the site, such as soil type, land productivity assessment rating, topography, aspect and water.

(v) Attributes that are relevant to the on-site disposal of wastewater, such as soil permeability, groundwater depths, slope and topography, aspect, and surface water bodies.

(vi) Attributes which are relevant to the provision of infrastructure services, such as roads, access-ways, stormwater management features, water supply and public amenities.

Figure 3 – Information Gathering and Assessment 2.2.4 Assess and evaluate

(a) Assess the information collected above using the guidelines and location-specific guidelines in chapters 3 and 4 of this Design Guide.

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(i) Map and describe areas of the site where land development would potentially result in adverse environmental effects because of environmental constraints. This information is termed “constraints information”.

(ii) Map and describe areas of the site where development could occur without adverse environmental effects that are more than minor. This information is termed

“opportunities information”.

(b) Overlay the constraints information with opportunities information from (a)(i) and (ii) above.

Use a map or maps to show areas that may be developed without adverse effects, and areas where development may result in conflict with one or more of the guidelines of the Design Guide.

(c) Identify any measures that may be used to avoid, remedy or mitigate a constraint and how a constraint may be overcome in a way that enables the guidelines to be met.

NOTE: In some cases, especially where the site is relatively small, the subject land area may not be suitable for any further subdivision and land development. All parts of the land may be affected by one or more development constraints in terms of the guidelines of this Design Guide.

2.2.5 Design options for subdivision and development

(a) Determine possible building location areas and allotment boundaries using the areas identified as opportunities for development. Apply the guidelines of the Design Guide when choosing sites and determining boundaries (Chapter 3).

(b) Identify road, access, service infrastructure, stormwater and wastewater management options using the guidelines of the Design Guide (Chapter 3).

(c) Combining steps (a) to (c), draft possible design option(s) for a subdivision and development proposal.

(d) Compare each design option against the guidelines of the Design Guide.

(e) Select a preferred design option based on consistency with the guidelines, alignment with the location-specific guidelines in Chapter 4, and all relevant objectives and policies of the Tasman Resource Management Plan.

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Figure 4 – Opportunities Assessment and Subdivision Design Layout Option

Building Sites Identified Cluster Subdivision Layout

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2.2.6 Document the process

(a) Compile all of the documentation used in the process of design, including the information gathered, the assessment and evaluation process, and the process of subdivision and development design.

(b) Explain and provide reasons for the preferred option.

(c) Submit the application and all process documentation to Council.

Figure 5 – Subdivision Design Process

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UIDELINES 3.0 Introduction

The guidelines provide extra assistance to applicants seeking to achieve the policies and objectives of the TRMP in respect of Rural 3 Zone subdivision and development.

They should be used to guide development and will be used in an assessment of consistency that is a requirement of the TRMP rules.

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(a) Avoid built development on visually prominent landscape features, such as ridgelines and hilltops.

(b) Retain the rural character of the site, including but not limited to a predominance of unbuilt open space and built features associated with rural productive activities.

(c) Determine allotment boundaries in a way that is sensitive to the topography of the land.

(d) Cluster built development in locations that are less visually prominent when viewed from public roads and other public places, including the coastline.

(e) Ensure that new built development is clustered in and around existing built development, except where those buildings are located in a visually prominent location.

(f) Choose building styles for new buildings that are complementary to existing development and to other development within a cluster.

(g) Choose building form, colour and finish materials that are visually recessive, non- reflective and merge into, rather than stand out, of the natural landscape.

(h) Ensure consistency with the relevant location-specific guidelines of Chapter 4 of the Design Guide.

3.2 High Productive Land

(a) Retain land that has high productive values for present or future productive land uses.

(b) Separate and/or buffer existing and future potential rural productive activities from residential land use activities so that residential activities will not result in undue restriction on those rural productive activities.

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(c) Seek to retain high productive land in unfragmented land-holdings, to maximise existing and future opportunities to use the land for rural productive purposes.

(d) Remove and replace quality topsoil from underneath buildings or hard surfaces to places where it may be re-used for rural productive purposes.

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Figure 6 – Protecting Productive Values

3.3 Fresh Water Resources and the Coastline

(a) Seek to maintain and/or enhance riparian buffer strips along the margins of all freshwater resources and the coast.

(b) Seek to protect riparian margins and the coast from stock access.

(c) Avoid, remedy or mitigate the effects of earthworks in close proximity to surface water bodies and the coastline.

(d) Avoid, remedy or mitigate the effects of modification of freshwater resources, in preference for protection and enhancement of them, which can benefit in-stream ecological values.

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(e) Seek to retain a significant separation distance and/or buffer between any building development and the margins of significant freshwater resources and the coast.

(f) Create esplanade reserves along the margin of significant waterways and the Waimea and Moutere Inlets.

Figure 7 – Maintaining and Enhancing Water Resources

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3.4 Drainage and Stormwater

(a) Retain the natural drainage characteristics of the landscape, including drainage contours, wetlands and streams.

(b) Avoid extensive earthworks and re-contouring.

(c) Manage stormwater runoff using natural drainage features of the site, and/or management methods that mimic natural water features such as streams, wetlands and ponds.

(d) Use Low Impact Design solutions for the management of stormwater where appropriate and suitable for the site conditions.

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(e) Use low impact stormwater design solutions.

(f) Consider the use of on-site stormwater detention in the management of stormwater to enhance groundwater replenishment and/or provide an alternative source of non-potable water.

(g) Ensure that any recontouring and landscape modifications are in keeping with the location- specific guidance (Chapter 4).

Figure 8 – Low Impact Drainage and Stormwater Management

3.5 Access and Transport

(a) Design roads and driveways to complement land contours and minimise the need for significant earthworks.

(b) Keep roads and driveways to a minimum, whilst maintaining minimum standards for road safety and the efficient functioning of the road network.

(c) Provide for alternative transportation and access opportunities, such as safe pedestrian access, cycleways and opportunities for future public transport needs.

(d) Take into account the transport needs of rural productive land uses in the design and layout of roads and internal accesses.

(e) Minimise the use of street lighting so that it is in keeping with rural expectations, whilst maintaining minimum standards for personal and road safety.

(f) Apply location-specific guidance (Chapter 4) to the design of access and roads.

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Figure 9 - Low Impact Design Stormwater Management C6 7/07

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3.6 Wastewater

(a) Provide a wastewater management system for the treatment and disposal of domestic wastewater from each dwelling, adequate to avoid, remedy or mitigate any actual or potential effects on water quality.

(b) Ensure that the disposal field of the wastewater systems(s) is located on terrain that is suitable for the disposal of wastewater in terms of soil permeability, drainage, slope, groundwater depth, waterways proximity and aspect.

(c) Ensure that the on-site wastewater treatment and disposal system(s) does not compromise other resource values such as the ability of high quality land to be used for rural productive uses.

(d) Locate the disposal system so that it does not compromise or become compromised by existing and proposed land features, such as stormwater drainage features, natural waterways, roads and building location areas.

(e) Ensure that the disposal system is large enough to assimilate the proposed long-term wastewater volume as well as incorporating sufficient reserve area.

(f) Apply water conservation measures in the design of the wastewater management system where possible, such as water use restrictions and grey-water recycling.

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Figure 10 – Wastewater Management

3.7 Water Supply

(a) Apply water conservation principles, such as rainwater storage and stormwater detention, in the design and layout of the development.

(b) Collect and store rainwater from the roofs of buildings and impermeable surfaces.

(c) Collect stormwater for non-potable water demands, such as irrigation for gardens and crops and/or additional fire-fighting capacity.

(d) Provide on-site water storage for the purpose of firefighting.

Figure 11 – On-site Water Storage, Efficient Use and Re-cycling

3.8 Recreation, Conservation and Open-Space

(a) Provide for public access alongside coastal margins and significant inland waterways.

(b) Provide for alternative public accessways - such as cycle-paths, walkways and bridle-paths - to connect dwellings and link them to each other, to public amenities and to other community services.

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(c) Seek to include public unbuilt open-space areas - such as recreation, conservation and amenity areas - within the subdivision, for the purpose of encouraging social interaction and healthy liveable communities.

(d) Integrate public unbuilt open-space areas with other design outcomes, such as effective stormwater management, riparian enhancement, and landscape protection.

(e) Apply location-specific guidance (Chapter 4) when integrating recreation and public open- space areas into the design and layout of the subdivision.

Figure 12 - Open-space Management through Subdivision Design

3.9 Allotments

(a) Apply the matters relating to location-specific guidance (Chapter 4) to the design and layout of allotments, when considering a pattern of allotments that will be sensitive to landscape values.

(b) Provide for allotment shapes and sizes which are sensitive to the topography of the site and sensitive to the landscape character of the surrounding environment.

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(c) Determine allotment boundaries with a view to minimising the potential for adverse cross- boundary effects between current and future rural productive uses.

(d) Seek to ensure that high-productive land is not fragmented by allotment boundaries in a manner that may prevent it from being utilised for existing or future productive land uses.

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Figure 13 – Allotment Layout and Design

3.10 Building Location Areas

(a) Seek to retain dwelling privacy and outlooks to the rural and/or coastal landscape in the selection of building location areas.

(b) Ensure that building location areas are in places that are not highly visible from the coast and public viewing points.

(c) Develop an uncluttered pattern of building location areas on the landscape.

(d) Locate building location areas in positions that will avoid, remedy or mitigate the potential for adverse cross-boundary effects with productive land uses.

(e) Avoid placing building location areas on land that has high productive values.

(f) Use the location-specific guidance (in Chapter 4) to assist in determining appropriate locations for building location areas.

Figure 14 – Building Location Area Layout

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3.11 Buildings and Structures

(a) Ensure that groups of buildings and rural village-type clusters of dwellings relate to each other and demonstrate similar or complementary styles and appearances.

(b) Locate buildings and structures, including water storage tanks, on sites that are not visually prominent.

(c) Seek to locate dwellings to take advantage of site features, such as sun exposure, shelter, privacy and outlook.

(d) Ensure that building colours are recessive and that finish materials are non-reflective.

(e) Ensure that the form and design of all buildings is visually unobtrusive, using low profile designs as opposed to multiple storey designs.

(f) Ensure that chimneys, satellite dishes and any other roof protrusions are visually unobtrusive.

(g) Avoid, remedy or mitigate the effects of locating buildings or structures on or in close proximity to prominent landscape features, such as hilltops, ridgelines or the coast.

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(h) Avoid locating buildings or structures in close proximity to the coastline and on or over riparian margins.

Figure 15 – Low Impact Building Design

3.12 Vegetation

(a) Seek to use amenity plantings to add to the overall amenity values of the site and surroundings.

(b) Seek to use vegetation to protect riparian margins of streams, inland waterways and the coastline and to stabilise steep and/or unstable slopes and enhance conservation and amenity values.

(c) Use plantings to screen buildings and structures.

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(d) Seek to use vegetation and plantings in the design of the subdivision in accordance with the location-specific guidelines of Chapter 4.

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Figure 16 – Landscape Sensitive Vegetation and Plantings

3.13 Long-term Management

(a) Define the long-term management of land that has high productive values, by addressing the ownership structure, legal arrangements, management responsibilities, maintenance funding, and any risk mitigation measures, where appropriate.

(b) Define the long term management of infrastructure systems, including ownership, discharge consent responsibilities, management and maintenance structures, funding of maintenance requirements and any risk mitigation measures, where appropriate.

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(c) Consider the development of a management plan to clearly articulate the details of any shared infrastructure system, such as any legal arrangements, funding responsibilities and maintenance requirements.

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Figure 17 – Long-term Management of Shared Open Space and Wastewater

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UIDELINES 4.0 Introduction

The location-specific guidelines have been prepared to accompany the map of landscape areas within the coastal Tasman area (see Planning Map 169). They are particularly important for understanding Council’s expectations in terms of the landscape guidelines contained in Chapter 3 of this Design Guide.

Based on landscape characteristics and values, a series of landscape units and sub-units has been determined. The capacity of each unit and sub-unit to absorb more development in landscape terms has been assessed. The location-specific guidelines provided in this section are based on this assessment.

Consistency with the location-specific guidelines can ensure that the landscape values of the coastal Tasman area are not compromised by inappropriate subdivision and development.

4.1 Maisey Road South (Landscape Unit 10)

Maisey Road South is relatively discrete and visually contained compared with the adjacent landscape units to the north and west. This area is not particularly visible from the coastal highway. There are few significant landscape features other than the distinctive watercourse pattern and associated landforms which are generally only evident from within the area itself. Views into the Redwood Valley area and the Waimea Inlet are significant as are views from those areas back into the landscape unit.

Maintaining the landscape qualities of this unit will involve:

(a) The maintenance of open space and productive buffers when viewed from the Coastal Highway.

(b) Focusing on cluster development within the internal landforms and gully system.

(c) Utilising riparian planting areas, ponds and wetland opportunities as buffer and open space areas.

(d) Consideration of the visual effects of development, when viewed from the Redwood Valley areas.

4.2 Waimea Inlet (Landscape Unit 9)

This landscape unit consists of four sub-units each of which appears as individual landforms extending from the Coastal Highway out into the Waimea Inlet. These peninsula-like landforms are significant coastal landscapes and are typical of the character and diverse landscape pattern of the coastal Tasman landscape.

Views of these coastal landforms from the Mapua and Rabbit Island/Moturoa areas are significant as are the views from the Coastal Highway and from within the sub-units themselves. While the Waimea Inlet unit displays quite different characteristics to the Inland Waimea unit (Unit 8), the inland landscape unit is integral to the Waimea Inlet particularly when viewed from the Inlet and from the Mapua and Rabbit Island/Moturoa areas. From these northern locations, the Inland Waimea unit provides the background setting for the Waimea Inlet. Accordingly, development within the Inland Waimea unit will have direct effects on the perception of the Waimea Inlet unit.

The scale of the Waimea Inlet unit is small and more intimate than the adjacent inland landscapes.

Consequently, development along the lines of discrete infilling or small clusters of two to three allotments is likely to be more appropriate. Generally the north side of the peninsulas is flatter, more visible and in horticultural production, compared to the southern slopes which tend to be steeper and in pasture with shelter and amenity plantings.

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Maintaining the landscape qualities within this landscape unit will involve:

(a) The maintenance of the open and rural pattern and character of the area.

(b) Maintaining a wide and extensive riparian buffer at the Waimea Inlet, particularly where adjacent landforms are low and relatively flat.

(c) Maintaining views of and to the Waimea Inlet.

(d) Avoiding skyline development and development that is highly visible.

(e) Retaining existing amenity and conservation tree planting and supplement these as appropriate with further strategic plantings.

(f) Avoiding house sites in open and visually exposed locations.

(g) Avoiding development where extensive earthworks are required.

(h) Maintaining landscape diversity and open rural pattern, particularly when viewed from other peninsula sub-units, the Waimea Inlet, the Mapua area and Rabbit Island/Moturoa.

4.2.1 Waimea Inlet – Research Orchard Road (Sub-unit 9D)

Maintaining the landscape qualities within this landscape unit will involve:

(a) The maintenance of the eastern ridge as a visual buffer with any development being discrete and not visually apparent.

(b) Maintaining a Coastal Highway buffer.

(c) Locating house sites back from the inlet towards the heads of local gully landforms.

4.2.2 Waimea Inlet – Hoddy Road (Sub-unit 9C)

Maintaining the landscape qualities within this landscape unit will involve:

(a) Development primarily occurring inland between the old Coastal Highway and the realigned Coastal Highway.

(b) Maintaining the character and pattern of land use on the peninsula in its present low-density form.

(c) Considering infill development or small clusters of two to three lots which are likely to be more appropriate in the Hoddy Road area.

(d) Restricting development east of where the seal ends on Hoddy Road as this outer peninsula area has little or no potential for further development of house sites without significant landscape and visual effects.

4.2.3 Waimea Inlet – Bronte (Sub-unit 9B)

Maintaining the landscape qualities within this landscape unit will involve:

(a) The maintenance of the open rural character as seen and experienced from Bronte Road East.

(b) Limiting further development on the south side of Bronte Road to infilling in appropriate and discrete locations.

(c) Maintaining the landform character on the south side of Bronte Road. C6 7/07

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(d) Ensuring that development on the north side of Bronte Road complements the existing pattern and nature of the landscape over the more visually prominent slopes.

4.2.4 Waimea Inlet – Matahua (Sub-unit 9A)

In this sub-unit there will be limited scope for additional subdivision and residential use in accordance with the guidelines.

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4.3 Inland Waimea (Landscape Unit 8)

This landscape unit consists of a series of well-defined inland valleys extending from the Coastal Highway back to Old Coach Road, which essentially follows the main north-south coastal ridge that defines the western extent of the Rural 3 Zone. The overall pattern and character of each area is rural.

The sub-units Stringer Creek (8C), Trafalgar Road (8B) and Nile Road (8A) have considerable potential for cluster-like development, particularly if this is carried out comprehensively and on an individual catchment or sub-unit basis. The Stringer Creek unit, and to a lesser extent the Trafalgar Road unit, also have potential for the development of rural village concepts either as stand-alone developments or integrated cluster or similar development concepts. In order to achieve the optimum outcome, a comprehensive and integrated approach to the development of the entire sub-unit or valley system needs to be undertaken.

The valley areas which make up the landscape sub-units are well defined and visually contained. The outlooks and aspect from and within each sub-unit is attractive and in most instances the effects of development as envisaged under the Rural 3 Zone can be accommodated and generally contained within each sub-unit.

Maintaining the landscape qualities within this landscape unit will involve:

(a) Comprehensively planned proposals as a means of optimising development opportunities.

(b) Maintaining a single and central access to the Coastal Highway from each sub-unit.

(c) Utilising the existing streams and wetland areas as landscape features.

(d) Ensuring that there is a substantial backdrop of trees, particularly on the main defining ridges and steeped hill country, in order to achieve a strong visual backdrop to the coastal environment when viewed from the Coastal Highway, the Waimea Inlet, Mapua, Rabbit Island/Moturoa and more distant locations.

(e) Utilising the varied landforms for development, particularly those on the north-facing slope.

(f) Minimising development on the south-facing slopes in each sub-unit.

(g) Keeping all development off significant landforms and ridges that are characteristic of or define the landscape sub-units.

(h) Avoiding development that is visually prominent on internal ridges and landforms.

(i) Avoiding development on steep slopes where extensive earthworks are required.

(j) Ensuring distant views from the Mapua and Rabbit Island/Moturoa areas are not compromised by development, particularly with regard to the landscape setting and tree backdrop that the higher slopes of the area provide.

(k) Setting development back several hundred metres from the Coastal Highway.

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(l) Having no development fronting or directly accessing Old Coach Road.

(m) Consideration of farm park concepts as an alternative to cluster developments.

(n) Consideration of rural village concepts as a feature and focus for an integrated development scenario.

4.3.1 Stringer Creek (Landscape Sub-Unit 8C)

Maintaining the landscape qualities within this landscape unit will involve:

(a) Focusing development on the north-facing slopes south of Stringer Creek.

(b) Utilising Stringer Creek as a major open space feature.

(c) Confining building development to areas below the ridgeline and spurs.

(d) Utilising the existing stock underpass of the Coastal Highway as a pedestrian access to the Waimea Inlet.

4.3.2 Trafalgar Road (Landscape Sub-Unit 8B)

Maintaining the landscape qualities within this landscape unit will involve:

(a) Focusing development on north-facing slopes south of the main internal valley stream.

(b) Utilising the main internal valley stream as a major open-space feature.

(c) Generally confining building development to areas below spurs and ridgelines within the sub- unit.

4.3.3 Nile Road (Landscape Sub-Unit 8A)

Maintaining the landscape qualities within this landscape unit will involve:

(a) Largely confining development to the south- and north-facing slopes of the sub-unit.

(b) Utilising the main internal valley stream as a major open-space feature.

(c) Generally confining building development to areas below spurs and ridgelines within the sub- unit.

(d) Avoiding any development on the central ridge between Nile Road and Dominion Road.

(e) Adopting a more discrete infilling approach to development within areas used for rural productive activity.

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(f) Limiting development on the north-facing slopes above Dominion Road.

4.4 Old Coach Road South (Landscape Unit 7)

The pattern of the internal ridgelines and associated valleys which extend eastwards from the Old Coach Road are a distinctive feature of the Old Coach Road South unit. The more distant views of the Waimea Inlet and its associated landforms provide spectacular and expansive views from the upper slopes of this area.

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The Old Coach Road South unit has been clear-felled and is currently experiencing a change to rural- residential holdings. Given the extent of approved subdivision, it is likely that there will be limited scope for further development within this area.

Maintaining the landscape qualities within this landscape unit will involve:

(a) The retention of the distinctive internal ridge and valley pattern.

(b) Focusing on small cluster or infill development in strategic locations where views both in and out of the area will not be compromised.

(c) Utilising extensive and integrated riparian plantings, wetlands and ponds as open space features and/or visual buffers.

(d) Avoiding skyline development, and development that is highly visible.

(e) Siting buildings and structures so they appear to sit within the landscape rather than on the landscape.

4.5 Inland Tasman (Landscape Unit 6)

The Inland Tasman unit consists of three internal valleys like sub-units that display similar characteristics and development opportunities as those in the Inland Waimea unit (Unit 8). The difference between these units is in part the nature of the current land use, the steepness of the topography, and the more visually apparent sub-unit definition in the Inland Waimea unit. In general, the Inland Tasman unit is more undulating, not as steep, and has a more distinctive and diverse landscape pattern. However, while the sub-units in this unitmay not appear to be as visually well-defined and self-contained as those in the Inland Waimea unit, there are distinct landscape boundaries between the sub-units.

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Within the Inland Tasman unit, considerable changes in land use are occurring with large areas of forest being clear-felled and orchards behind removed. Rural residential subdivision is also occurring in localities around the mid-slope of the sub areas. In recent years the character of the area has changed with the removal of both forest and orchard trees. Generally the landscape in unit five has more open appearance and, in many areas, is relatively devoid of any visible tree plantings. Trees, both productive and amenity or conservation plantings, are an important element in the coastal Tasman landscape. Where extensive areas of woody vegetation are removed, the qualities of the landscape tend to diminish and, in some cases, are severely compromised.

Sub-units Beulah Ridge (6B), William Road (6A) and to a lesser extent Pomona Road (6C) have considerable potential for cluster-like development, particularly if this was carried out comprehensively and on an individual or extensive sub-unit basis. Sub-units Beulah Ridge (6B) and Williams Road (6A) also have potential for the development of rural village concepts as stand-alone developments or integrated with cluster or similar development concepts. In order to achieve the optimum outcome, a comprehensive and integrated approach needs to be undertaken. Similar opportunities are available in the upper area of the Horton Road sub-unit (5A), particularly if this is integrated with Beulah Ridge (6B).

Maintaining the landscape qualities within this landscape unit will involve:

(a) Comprehensively planned proposals as a means of optimising development opportunities.

(b) Maintaining as far as possible the particular character of each sub-unit.

(c) Ensuring that substantial plantings of trees, including back drop plantings on the higher slopes are initiated and maintained in order to provide a distinctive landscape setting for development.

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(d) Ensuring that development of this landscape unit does not compromise development opportunities in Landscape Unit 6.

(e) Utilising existing streams, ponds and wetland areas as landscape features.

(f) Seeking to ensure that areas used for rural production activities are maintained and protected wherever possible as an integral part of the ‘developed’ landscape pattern.

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(g) Keeping all development off significant landforms and ridges that are characteristic and/or define the landscape sub-units.

(h) Avoiding development on steep slopes, visually prominent landforms, and where extensive earthworks are required.

(i) Having no development fronting or directly accessing Old Coach Road.

(j) Consideration of farm parks concepts as an alternative to cluster developments.

(k) Consideration of rural village concepts as a feature and focus within the landscape unit.

(l) Being sensitive to views from the Coastal Highway.

4.5.1 Pomona Road (Landscape Sub-unit 6C)

Maintaining the landscape qualities within this landscape unit will involve:

(a) The maintenance of the productive appearance and pattern of the landscape.

(b) Focusing development on the western side of the sub-unit.

(c) Developing the flatter and less visually prominent areas of what is largely a relatively open landscape on the western side of the sub-unit.

(d) Considering infill development of small clusters of two to three lots rather than larger clusters.

(e) Retaining and supplementing amenity plantings.

4.5.2 Beulah Ridge (Landscape Sub-unit 6B)

Maintaining the landscape qualities within this landscape unit will involve:

(a) Avoiding visually prominent development on the main ridges and internal spurs.

(b) Utilising local internal terraces and plateaus for cluster-like developments.

(c) Being mindful and sensitive to the development impacts and relationships between adjacent sub-units and, in particular, sub-unit 6B and to a lesser extent sub-units 5A and 6A.

(d) Focusing development opportunities west of the ridge above Awa Awa Road.

(e) Generally keeping development below spurs and ridgelines within the sub-unit.

4.5.3 Williams Road (Landscape Sub-unit 6A)

Maintaining the landscape qualities within this landscape unit will involve:

(a) Retaining an adequate and effective buffer to the Tasman settlement.

(b) Focusing development towards the central and upper areas of the sub-unit.

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(c) Generally keeping development off the upper ridges and below spurs and ridgelines within the sub-unit.

(d) Creating a sense of identity and pattern in a landscape that currently exhibits few distinctive landforms.

(e) Utilising the moderately rolling landforms and distinctive valleys to create a new and diverse landscape pattern.

(f) Maximising riparian plantings as a form-giving element to the landscape.

4.6 Coastal Highway North (Landscape Unit 5)

Landscape Unit 5 largely covers the flat and low rolling ridges south of the Coastal Highway between Ruby Bay and the settlement of Tasman. There are two sub-units within this landscape unit.

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While the two sub-units have potential for cluster-like development and should be comprehensively planned on a unit basis, both areas offer opportunities for a farm or orchard park type development, either on a large scale or as smaller developments. Likewise a compact village-like development may also be an appropriate form of development. The retention of a meaningful productive pattern to the landscape is, however, considered to be essential with any form of development under the Rural 3 Zone. As previously noted, there are visual relationships and connections between sub-units Ruby Bay Cliffs (5B), Horton Road (5A) and Beulah Ridge (6B). This relationship should be respected, particularly if development occurs in close proximity to each of these sub-units.

Maintaining the landscape qualities within this landscape unit will involve:

(a) Maintaining the productive horticultural pattern and appearance of the landscape particularly when viewed from the Coastal Highway.

(b) Setting development back from the Coastal Highway.

(c) Comprehensively planned proposals as a means of optimising development opportunities and maintaining landscape values.

(d) Keeping development off significant landforms and ridges that are visually significant or prominent.

(e) Avoiding skyline development.

(f) Avoiding development on steep slopes or where extensive earthworks are required.

(g) Consideration of integrated farm park concepts as an alternative to cluster like development.

(h) Consideration of an integrated comprehensive development focusing on a central feature and combining parts or all of sub-units Ruby Bay Cliffs (5B), Horton Road (5A) and Beulah Ridge (6B).

(i) Utilising existing streams, ponds and wetlands as landscape features.

(j) Initiating extensive amenity and conservation tree planting to replace and supplement existing tree pattern which has been modified and reduced.

(k) Integrating patterns of use, development and landscape enhancement with the adjacent Inland Tasman Landscape Unit 6.

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4.7 Kina (Landscape Unit 4)

The Kina unit (Landscape Unit 4) extends from the Moutere Bluff to the north end of the Kina Peninsula.

The Tasman Sea defines the eastern edge of the landscape unit, with the Coastal Highway defining the western edge of the unit. The peninsula-like landform consists of three landscape sub-units. The Kina South (4C) and Tasman Golf Course (7B) units, while similar in nature, are different in terms of the landscape setting and character compared to sub-unit, Kina Peninsula (4A), which appears more open and is more visible than sub-units, Kina South (4C) and Tasman Golf Course (4B).

In recent years rural residential development has occurred throughout the landscape unit, particularly in the northern area of the Kina Peninsula unit (4C). Generally this development is not visible from the coastal highway. While visibility of Landscape Unit 7 from the coastal highway is constrained between Moutere Bluff and the settlement of Tasman, views of Kina peninsula and the north-facing slopes of the Tasman Golf Course unit (4B) are visually significant when travelling south.

Within the Kina South (4C) and Tasman Golf Course (4B) units there is potential for both infill development and/or small cluster developments. Development on the western slopes above the Coastal Highway is likely to be visually prominent and should be confined to discrete locations. Further development within the Kina Peninsula unit (4A) is limited.

Maintaining the landscape qualities within this landscape unit will involve:

(a) Sensitivity to the views of development from the Coastal Highway, the Moutere Inlet, and the Ruby Bay area in general.

(b) Sensitivity to views of development from the inland area and in particular the Coastal Highway North and Inland Tasman landscape units (6 and 5).

(c) Adequate setbacks from the Coastal Highway and the coastal margins, particularly in sub- units Kina South (4C) and Tasman Golf Course (4B).

(d) Keeping all development off significant landforms and ridges.

(e) Avoiding development on steep slopes and where extensive earthworks are required.

(f) Visually containing development within discrete locations.

(g) Utilising existing streams and wetland areas as landscape features.

4.7.1 Kina South (Landscape Sub-unit 4C)

Maintaining the landscape qualities within this landscape unit will involve:

(a) Focusing further development in the southern area of the sub-unit.

(b) Keeping development inland of the coastal escarpment.

(c) Considering an internal focus for development.

4.7.2 Tasman Golf Course (Landscape Sub-unit 4B)

Maintaining the landscape qualities within this landscape unit will involve:

(a) Maintaining landscape diversity particularly when viewed from the Moutere Inlet and from the Coastal Highway.

(b) Maintaining the appearance and pattern of land use in a low density form.

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4.7.3 Kina Peninsula (Landscape Sub-unit 4A)

Maintaining landscape qualities will be achieved by limited opportunities for subdivision and the location of additional house sites in this landscape sub-unit.

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4.8 Harley Road South (Landscape Unit 3)

Unlike the landscape units to the south of this unit, the Harley Road Landscape Unit extends from a relatively narrow neck adjacent to the Moutere Inlet up to Old Coach Road ridge. Within this landscape unit the boundary between the Rural 3 Zone and the Rural 2 Zone defines the two sub-units that make up the Harley Road South Landscape Unit. While this landscape sub-unit boundary may appear to be somewhat arbitrary, it generally accords with the landscape character and pattern of the area and its wider landscape setting.

Landscape Unit 3, which encompasses the Rural 3 Zone, is relatively well defined in visual terms by the existing valley landforms that define this landscape unit. The backdrop to the large internal valley is the Old Coach Road ridge with the Harley Road ridge to the north and the Dicker Road ridge to the south defining the other major edges to the unit. The more open and narrow landscape unit comprising the Rural 1 Zoned land (sub-unit 3A) provides partial containment from the Coastal Highway with local landforms relative to both the orientation of the main part of the valley and public viewpoints from the Coastal Highway and the Moutere Inlet in general. While sub-unit 3A is not within the Rural 3 Zone, in landscape terms, the relationship between these two sub-units is important and should be acknowledged in any development proposals within the Harley Road South landscape unit.

Access to development clusters within the Rural 3 Zone should be from Old Coach Road, Harley Road or Dicker Road rather than from the Coastal Highway. With the Dicker Road alignment being the likely alignment for the Ruby Bay bypass, access from Old Coach Road is possibly the best option.

Notwithstanding this Old Coach Road, from the Dicker Road intersection to the Moutere River, should be considered and protected as a future major scenic road corridor. Views to the coast and Tasman Bay/Te Tai-o-Aorere and inland to the Arthur Range/Wharepapa and Kahurangi National Park are possible from this location. Accordingly, development clusters should be located sensitively to protect views with houses planned and sited so as to avoid potential adverse visual effects on the expansive and panoramic views that will be available from this section of Old Coach Road in the future.

The large internal valley, which makes up Landscape Unit 3, offers considerable scope for discrete clusters of development utilizing the existing landform pattern to define appropriate development clusters. The bulk of this land is currently in one ownership and it is essential from a landscape perspective that a comprehensive and integrated structure plan for the entire unit be prepared and approved prior to applications being made for individual cluster developments. The already consented Rural 3 development immediately to the south of Harley Road is relatively well contained relative to the balance of the landscape unit and will not compromise the preparation of a structure plan and the integrated design development of the balance of the landscape unit.

Maintaining the landscape qualities within this landscape unit will involve:

(a) The preparation of comprehensive and integrated development proposals as a means of optimising development opportunities and environmental outcomes.

(b) Consideration of a farm park or rural village-type development as an alternative to the more traditional cluster-type development.

(c) Maintaining the distinctive character, landform and stream patterns within the overall landscape unit.

(d) Utilising existing streams, ponds and wetland areas as landscape features.

(e) Keeping all development of buildings and structures off significant and defining landforms and ridges that are characteristic and/or features of the landscape unit.

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(f) Avoiding development on steep slopes, visually prominent landforms and where extensive earthworks are required.

(g) Avoiding direct lot access from Old Coach Road.

(h) Having no further development or access off Harley Road.

(i) Limiting development cluster access from Dicker Road so as to minimise possible conflicts with future bypass extensions to Tasman.

(j) Maintaining the open character of the Dicker Road ridge as a defining landscape feature between Landscape Unit 8 and Landscape sub-units 6B and 6A.

(k) Maintaining the open character of the Harley Road ridge as a defining feature between Landscape Units 3 and 2.

(l) Being sensitive to the protection of views from Old Coach Road.

(m) Integrating patterns of use, development and landscape enhancement with the adjacent landscape unit and associated sub-units.

(n) Keeping all buildings and structures below the Old Coach Road ridge.

(o) Initiating extensive amenity and conservation tree planting to replace and supplement the existing forest tree pattern, which will be dramatically reduced.

4.9 Harley Road North (Landscape Unit 2)

The Harley Road North Landscape Unit extends northward from Harley Road to the northern boundary of the Rural 3 Zone. The landscape unit is defined on its inland side by Old Coach Road and the Rural 3 Zone boundary on the seaward side. As with Landscape Unit 3 (Harley Road South), the area has historically been defined by its forestry use on the steep upper slopes and the more productive Rural 1 and 2 land on the lower and flatter landforms that extend down to the Coastal Highway. In landscape terms, the wider Landscape Unit, which includes Sub-Unit 2A, extends from Old Coach Road to the Coastal Highway.

While the boundary between these two sub-units is land use and cadastral based, it nevertheless provides an appropriate landscape and visual differentiation between sub-units.

Landscape Unit 2 essentially consists of four relatively well-defined valley systems. The area overall, as well as the individual valleys, have the potential to accommodate cluster type development. As with Landscape Unit 3, development access would best be from Old Coach Road, utilising the defining ridges between each of the valleys. Access from the Coastal Highway via Eden Road or Weka Road would be adverse and would change the nature and character of these rural areas. From a landscape perspective, it is important that the open nature of the defining ridges be retained with the cluster developments being set within the respective valley systems thereby retaining the overall open rural character to the landscape whilst providing a framework and context for the individual development clusters.

Development in the immediate area of the Rural 3 Zone boundary and the Rural 1 and 2 zone land on the seaward side of the Rural 3 Zone should be sensitive to the landscape values of both sub-units. In addition, the development of clusters and individual lots should acknowledge and be sensitive to the longer term prospect of Old Coach Road becoming a major scenic road corridor between Mapua and Motueka.

While the valley immediately to the north of Harley Road has recently been subdivided, the balance of the landscape unit should be subject to a comprehensive and integrated structure plan prior to any further development of individual clusters of development. Given the current land tenure position within both Landscape Units 3 and 2, the opportunity for the preparation of a comprehensive structure plan would ensure the best development outcome could be achieved in this large green fields area.

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Maintaining the landscape qualities within this landscape unit will involve:

(a) The preparation of comprehensive and integrated development proposals as a means of optimising development opportunities and environmental outcomes.

(b) Consideration of a farm park or rural village-type development as an alternative to the more traditional cluster type development.

(c) Maintaining the distinctive character, landform and stream patterns within the overall landscape unit.

(d) Utilising existing streams, ponds and wetland areas as landscape features.

(e) Keeping all development of buildings and structures off significant and defining landforms and ridges that are characteristic and/or features of the landscape unit.

(f) Avoiding development on steep slopes, visually prominent landforms and where extensive earthworks are required.

(g) Avoiding direct lot access from Old Coach Road.

(h) Being sensitive to the protection of views from Old Coach Road.

(i) Integrating patterns of use, development and landscape enhancement with the adjacent landscape unit and associated sub-units.

(j) Keeping the rooftops of all buildings and structures well below the Old Coach Road ridgeline so that they are not visible from the road.

(k) Initiating extensive amenity and conservation tree planting to replace and supplement the existing forest tree pattern, which will be dramatically reduced.

4.10 Mariri (Landscape Unit 1)

While this landscape unit does not come within the Rural 3 Zone, its relationship and landscape context with sub-units 3A & 2A along with their combined relationship with the adjacent Rural 3 Zone, is particularly important from a landscape and rural character perspective. The coastal edge between the Tasman settlement and Mariri has a distinctive landscape character and pattern of rural development that should be maintained and protected. Development within the adjoining Rural 3 Zone should clearly acknowledge and be sensitive to the rural and landscape values of the coastal margin and foothills along the adjacent Moutere Inlet.

Maintaining the landscape qualities within this landscape unit will involve:

(a) Ensuring development in the adjacent Rural 3 Zone respects the rural characteristics and landscape values of this landscape unit and sub-units 3A and 2A.

(b) Providing access to the adjacent Rural 3 Zone developments from Old Coach Road.

(c) Retaining the existing zoning Rural 1 and Rural 2 pattern within this landscape unit and the adjacent sub-units 3A and 2A.

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References

Related documents

Endorsed by Board of Studies NSW for cohort commencing 2011 April 2011 Marine Page 2 of 3 Course content Unit code Unit title Unit-specific prerequisite Status for AQF VET