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THSC Policy 19/2017-2020 – Community Initiated Capital Works Proposals: July 2019 1

COMMUNITY INITIATED CAPITAL WORKS

PROPOSALS

Policy 19/2017-2020

DATE

Ordinary Meeting of Council – 23 July 2019

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THSC Policy 19/2017-2020 – Community Initiated Capital Works Proposals: July 2019 2 POLICY NO: 19/2017-2020

LEGISLATIVE REQUIREMENTS

NA

RESPONSIBILITY: SHIRE STRATEGY, TRANSFORMATION AND SOLUTIONS OBJECTIVE: To provide guidance and establish criteria by which an

incorporated community group or sporting club may make application for external funding and/or Council funding to support the provision of new infrastructure, or improvements to existing infrastructure, on Council owned land.

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THSC Policy 19/2017-2020 – Community Initiated Capital Works Proposals: July 2019 3

Contents

Section Subject Page

1 Funds sought from external parties 4

2 Council contributions 4

3 Loans from Council by Proponents 5

4 Projects Fully Funded by Proponents 5

5 Assessment Criteria 5

6 Approvals 6

7 Associated Documents 6

8 Appendix 7

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THSC Policy 19/2017-2020 – Community Initiated Capital Works Proposals: July 2019 4 1. Funds sought from external sources

Incorporated community groups and sporting clubs should be encouraged to seek and obtain funding from various external sources towards appropriate projects that demonstrate benefit to their respective organisations and the local community. External sources of funding may include grants, loans, donations and sponsorships.

Any project requiring funding from an external source must have prior approval from Council if it will have an impact on Council assets, land or infrastructure.

Failure to obtain Council approval prior to making an application to, or reaching an agreement with, an external funding source may result in Council not supporting the project.

The funding of projects through external sources does not guarantee long term or exclusive tenure of facilities. Infrastructure constructed upon Council land ultimately becomes a community asset and the property of Council.

2. Council contributions

Council will only support financial contributions towards projects if that project meets the following criteria:

 Project has allocated funding adopted by Council and identified in the Capital Works Program.

 Project proposal has considered and can demonstrate the ongoing lifecycle maintenance and replacements costs are within approved budgets.

 Project is in accordance with Council’s plans and strategies including The Hills Shire Plan and Open Space Strategy.

 Project is part of the proponents’ strategic plan.

 Designs and specifications have been prepared or commenced with preliminary costings.

 Provides new or increased sport and recreation opportunities or community facilities in the Shire.

No project is to be commenced without Council approval.

Should it be determined that there is a shortfall in funding, the proponent will be responsible for obtaining the additional funds to complete the project, stage the works within the available budget, or return the funds if the project cannot be undertaken or completed satisfactorily and within a reasonable timeframe.

The level of funding potentially available from Council is limited and in any one year, no projects or only a limited number of projects may be funded. Projects will need to be assessed against competing priorities.

3. Loans from Council by Proponents

Loans will only be considered for projects identified in Council’s Open Space Strategy.

Loan amounts will be determined by Council. Loan periods should not exceed 10 years

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THSC Policy 19/2017-2020 – Community Initiated Capital Works Proposals: July 2019 5 unless otherwise agreed to by Council. The rate of interest charged will be determined by Council.

Loans will be assessed against certain criteria including:

 The size and cost of the project.

 Financial capacity of the applicant organisation to repay the loan.

 All alternative non-Council funding opportunities have been explored and documented.

 The organisations’ history of payment of accounts – bank audit/statements.

 The income generating capacity of the proposed project.

 The benefit of the proposed project to the organisation and the community.

 Life cycle, maintenance and replacements costs have been considered.

If at any point loan repayments fall in arrears, Council reserves the right to terminate any pre-arranged extended tenure through a licence or lease agreement.

4. Projects Fully Funded by Proponent

Projects that have funding identified in full with no reliance upon Council contributions will also require assessment against criteria.

Depending on the level of investment, proponents may have an opportunity to seek an extended tenure for their facility through a Licence Agreement. Under such Licence Agreements Proponents may be able to negotiate with Council tenures of up to 10 years for investments of between $100,000 and $250,000 (Simple Projects – Large) or up to 20 years for investments in excess of $250,000 (Complex Projects).

Where extended tenures are sought through a Licence Agreement, such proposals must be reported to Council for consideration.

5. Assessment Criteria

Projects will be assessed against criteria specified in further detail in the Guidelines and Procedures for Community Initiated Capital Works Proposals. Projects will be determined by their complexity, value and compliance to criteria. These include, but not necessarily limited to:

Simple Projects – Small:

 Below $100,000 in value.

 Requires no statutory approvals.

 All funding confirmed.

 No funding required from Council, or funds identified in Council’s Capital Works Program.

 Project can proceed without Council approval under delegated authority of the General Manager.

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THSC Policy 19/2017-2020 – Community Initiated Capital Works Proposals: July 2019 6 Simple Projects – Large:

 Project value between $100,000-$250,000

 Requires no statutory approvals or such approvals have already been obtained.

 All funding confirmed.

 No funding required from Council, or funds identified in Council’s Capital Works Program.

 Project can proceed without Council approval under delegated authority of the General Manager

 Proponent has demonstrated capacity to undertake the project.

 Project is identified in Council’s plans and strategies.

Complex Projects:

 Project value upwards of $250,000.

 Statutory approvals required.

 Not all funding identified.

 A funding contribution is required from Council.

 Proponent has not demonstrated a capacity to undertake the project.

 Project may or may not be identified in Council’s plans and strategies.

 Project requires Council approval to proceed.

In assessing submissions for approval for infrastructure works, grant funding and requests for Council’s financial contribution, Council will take into consideration full life cycle cost. It will also require the proponent to demonstrate capacity to fulfil any financial commitments on its part.

Total project costings will need to include direct construction costs and where applicable, design and supervision costs, regulatory fees and a construction contingency.

In considering submissions Council may also give preference to applications from community based sporting clubs that have current tenure or allocations on the subject site.

6. Approvals

Proponents must provide evidence of all statutory approvals required for their proposed projects. If no approvals are required, proponents must provide evidence that their projects are exempt from any approval.

Failure to secure necessary approvals may result in Council not considering the proposal.

7. Associated Documents

Community Initiated Capital Works Proposals – Guidelines and Procedures.

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THSC Policy 19/2017-2020 – Community Initiated Capital Works Proposals: July 2019 7 8. Appendix

Nil.

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COMMUNITY INITIATED

CAPITAL WORKS PROPOSALS

 

 

GUIDE FOR SUBMISSGUIDELINES AND

GUIDELINES AND PROCEDURES

         

 

 

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Community Initiated Capital Works Proposals: Guidelines and Procedures  

 

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CONTENTS

1 INTRODUCTION 2

1.1 Background 2

1.2 Definition 2

1.3 Assessment Process and Criteria 2

1.4 Contact Details and Lodgement 4

2 GUIDING PRINCIPLES 5

2.1 Optimise Outcomes 5

2.2 Concept Review Assessment Criteria 5

2.3 Strategic Assessment Criteria 5

2.4 Resources Commitments 7

2.5 Participation Agreement (Contract) 7

2.6 Timeframe 7

2.7 Extended Tenure for Significant Capital Investments 8

3 ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES 9

3.1 Proponent 9

3.2 Council 9

4 THE PROCESS 9

4.1 Introduction 10

4.2 Stage 1 – Concept Review 10

4.3 Stage 2 – Strategic Assessment 11

4.4 Stage 3 – Detailed Proposal and Recommendation 12

5 PROCESS FLOWCHART 13

6 SCHEDULE OF INFORMATION 14

7 PRE-LODGEMENT MEETING CHECKLIST 17

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1 INTRODUCTION

1.1 Background

From time to time Council receives proposals by community groups and sporting clubs who are prepared to either fully fund or partially fund capital works projects that are intended to benefit their respective organisations as well as the local community.

In some cases these Proponents may be seeking a contribution from Council toward the project by way of direct funding or some form of loan facility, either through Council itself or a financial institution in which case Council may be required to act as loan guarantor.

In order to facilitate worthwhile projects of this type and establish key criteria that must be met to allow such projects to proceed, Council has adopted a Community Initiated Capital Works Proposals Policy (Policy 19/2017-2020).

The purpose of these guidelines and procedures is to support that Policy by providing guidance to Proponents considering submitting such a proposal as well as Council officers assessing such proposals.

1.2 Definition

A Community Initiated Capital Works Proposal is an approach from a proponent such as a community group or sporting club to deal directly with Council over a proposal to build and/or finance infrastructure where Council has not initiated the proposal.

1.3 Assessment Process and Criteria

This Procedure sets out the processes to be followed by Council and Proponents in developing Community Initiated Capital Works Proposals. Proposals will be evaluated against the set Assessment Criteria in this guide. A staged assessment process of up to three stages has been developed to guide the evaluation of proposals, depending on their level of complexity and value:

 Stage 1 – Concept Review and Submission of Proposal.

 Stage 2 – Strategic Assessment.

 Stage 3 (Complex Projects only) – Detailed Proposal and Recommendation (approval or non-approval).

Projects are generally defined as Simple (Small or Large Scale) or Complex proposals based on value and compliance and requirements as described below:

Simple Projects – Small Scale

Assessment Criteria Compliance/ Requirement/

Limitations

Project Value Below $100,000

Compliance with Council Plans and Strategies Yes

All Project Funding Confirmed Yes

Council Funding Required Yes or No

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Council Funding Confirmed Yes or Not Applicable

All Approvals Obtained Yes or Not Applicable

Proponent has demonstrated capacity to undertake project

Yes

Extended Tenure Requested No extended tenure to be provided

Stages in Process Stage 1

Stage 2

Approval can be granted by General Manager at Stage 2 under delegated authority

Simple Projects – Large Scale

Assessment Criteria Compliance/ Requirement/

Limitations

Project Value $100,000 to $250,000

Compliance with Council Plans and Strategies Yes

All Project Funding Confirmed Yes

Council Funding Required Yes or No

Council Funding Confirmed Yes or Not Applicable

All Approvals Obtained Yes or Not Applicable

Proponent has demonstrated capacity to undertake project

Yes

Extended Tenure Requested Up to 10 years – depending on financial contribution by proponent

Stages in Process Stage 1

Stage 2

Approval can be granted by General Manager at Stage 2 under delegated authority

Complex Projects

Assessment Criteria Compliance/ Requirement/

Limitations

Project Value Above $250,000

Compliance with Council Plans and Strategies Yes or No

All Project Funding Confirmed Yes or No

Council Funding Required No

Council Funding Confirmed Yes or Not Applicable

All Approvals Obtained Yes or Not Applicable

Proponent has demonstrated capacity to undertake project

Yes or No

Extended Tenure Requested Up to 20 years – depending on financial contribution by proponent

Stages in Process Stage 1

Stage 2 Stage 3

Approval can be granted by Council resolution only at Stage 3

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It is recognised that a Proponent will have a reasonable expectation that it will receive some form of direct benefit for its involvement in this type of project (e.g. an increased tenure for access to the facility, exclusive use, reduced or capped hire rates etc.). However the benefits to the Proponent must also be consistent with Council’s strategic direction and therefore must also provide a benefit to the broader community.

 

Where Council assesses a proposal as not meeting the criteria, Council reserves its usual right to refuse the proposal.

1.4 Contact Details and Lodgement

Enquiries and requests for a meeting to discuss a Community Initiated Capital Works Proposal should be submitted to: [email protected]

 

Submissions should be forwarded to:

General Manager The Hills Shire Council PO Box 7034

NORWEST NSW 2153

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2 GUIDING PRINCIPLES

2.1 Optimise Outcomes

By their nature, Community Initiated Capital Works Proposals are sometimes unlikely to be the current focus of Council’s strategic planning. Proposals must therefore be considered in light of the wider benefits and strategic outcomes that may be derived. In order to proceed however, proposals must be broadly consistent with Council’s objectives and plans.

Outcomes must always be in the best interest of Council and the broader community.

Types of proposals that are NOT considered unique and/or proposals that are unlikely to be progressed

 Proponents seeking to directly purchase or acquire a Council-owned entity or property. Unless the proposal presents a unique opportunity to Council, the Council is unlikely to enter into such an arrangement without an open tender process as it must at all times comply with its legislative obligations.

 Proposals for significant extensions/variations to existing contracts/leases, or the next stage of a staged project on the basis that the contractor is already ‘on-site’ or has some other claimed advantages, absent of other ‘uniqueness’ criteria.

 Proposals seeking to provide facilities on land that is not owned by Council or the Proponent.

 Proposals that are early concepts or lack detail

 Proposals that are not identified in Council’s plans and strategies including The Hills Shire Plan or Open Space Strategy.

Council will at all times retain the absolute discretion to refuse a proposal.

2.2 Concept Review Assessment Criteria

Proposals are reviewed against a basic checklist (see Section 7 of this Guide) for initial compliance. Proposals not meeting these criteria will be rejected. In some instances, depending on the non-complying element/s, further information may be sought from the Proponent.

2.3 Strategic Assessment Criteria

Proposals will be initially assessed against the Assessment Criteria in the table below.

Assessment will be based on the proposal satisfactorily meeting each of the criteria.

Additional Criteria relevant to a particular proposal may also be applied at later stages. If so, the Proponent will be informed of the criteria in order for these to be addressed in its Detailed Proposal during Stage 3.

Criteria Description

Value for Money Does the proposal deliver value for money to Council?

 Does the proposal provide assets or facilities that would not otherwise be provided at all or not until some point in the future?

 

A proposal is Value for Money if it achieves the required project outcomes and objectives in an efficient, high quality, innovative

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and cost- effective way with appropriate regard to the allocation, management and mitigation of risks.

 

While Value for Money will be tested appropriately in the context of each specific proposal, factors that will be given consideration are likely to include:

 Quality of all aspects of the proposal, including: achievable timetable, clearly stated proposal objectives and outcomes, design, community impacts, detailed proposal documentation and appropriate commercial and/or contractual agreements (including any key performance targets), and a clearly set- out process for obtaining any planning or other required approvals.

 Innovation in service delivery, infrastructure design, construction methodologies, and maintenance.

 Competitively tendering aspects of the proposal where feasible or likely to yield value for money.

 Details of funding contributions by the Proponent or through external sources.

 Optimal risk allocation.

Evaluation of Value for Money may also include, but not be limited to the following quantitative analysis:

 Assessment of the Proponent’s financial models to determine the reasonableness of any capital, service and maintenance cost estimates and, if relevant, revenue estimates.

 This evaluation may include the use of independent experts or valuers, benchmarking analysis, quotations and sensitivity testing.

 Return on Investment.

 The Proponent has considered the ongoing maintenance and replacement costs associated with the proposed project are within approved budgets.

Whole of Council Impact

Does the proposal meet a project or service need?

 

What is the overall strategic merit of the proposal?

 

Is the proposal consistent with Council’s plans and priorities such as the Open Space Strategy and The Hills Shire Plan?

Proponents must demonstrate how the project fits into its own strategic plan.

 

Does the proposal require and/or the potential to achieve planning approval, taking into account relevant planning and environmental controls?

 

Consideration will be given to whether the proposal would require Council to re- prioritise and re-allocate funding.

Demonstrate benefits to the organisation and the general community.

Capability and Capacity

Does the proponent have the experience, capability and capacity to carry out the proposal?

Can this proposal be readily delivered?

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What reliance is there on third parties including Council?

 

Does the Proponent have the financial capability and capacity to undertake the project?

Affordability Does the proposal require Council funding? If so, does Council have these funds available or identified in its budget, and if not what source of funding is proposed?

 

Where Council funding is required, Council may undertake or require the Proponent to undertake a Business Case and/or an economic appraisal (where appropriate such as loans).

Regardless of the outcome of the Business Case/economic appraisal, the proposal still needs to be affordable in the context of Council’s other priorities, and to be considered as part of Council’s budget process.

Risk Allocation What risks are to be borne by the proponent and by Council?

Appropriate risk allocation and quantification may also be considered under the Value for Money criterion.

 

Does the proposal require formal approvals? If so, has the process been appropriately considered, including whether Council or Proponent bears the risks associated in obtaining the approvals.

2.4 Resource Commitments

In order for a Community Initiated Capital Works Proposal to progress, the Proponent will be required to commit resources to the project.

While this Guide sets out information and processes to minimise costs for Proponents, Council will not normally provide a reimbursement of costs associated with Community Initiated Capital Works Proposals.

Where a funding contribution is required from Council, it would have to be considered on a priority basis in the development of Council’s Annual Works Program.

2.5 Participation Agreement (Contract)

A Participation Agreement (Contract) provides an agreed framework for the project which may be entered into by both Council and the Proponent depending on the complexity of the proposal, its value and its source of funding, in order to ensure the alignment of expectations regarding participation in the process.

A Participation Agreement will normally only be required for Complex Projects. However depending on the circumstances, it may also be required for some Simple Projects (Large Scale).

2.6 Timeframe

The timing of proposed projects can vary and be influenced by deadlines particularly related to funding. These can include:

 Availability of Council funding for the identified project (the year funds are allocated towards the project). Where proposed projects are reliant upon Council funds, they should align with the timeframes for the development of the Annual Works Program.

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 Timeframes for grant funding to be expended by.

 Usage of facilities where the project is to be undertaken upon – off-season etc.

2.7 Extended Tenure for Significant Capital Investments

Depending on the level of investment and significance of the proposed project, proponents may have an opportunity to seek an extended tenure for their facility.

Proponents may be able to negotiate with Council extended tenures of:

 Up to 10 years for investments between $100,000 and $250,000 (Simple Projects – Large Scale)

 Up to 20 years for investments in excess of $250,000 (Complex Projects).

Where extended tenures are sought, such proposals must be reported to Council for consideration and will form part of the Stage 3 process. This may include the need to exhibit or advertise the proposal for the purpose of entering into a formal lease or licence for the site under the provisions of the NSW Local Government Act 1993.

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3 ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

3.1 Proponent

The Proponent is required to:

 

 Determine they have met the required criteria against the checklist.

 Prepare a Submission for the proposal.

 Provide a Detailed Proposal including plans and approvals at Stage 3.

 Prepare any necessary grant applications in consultation with Council.

3.2 Council

Proposals will be submitted to Council for approval prior to any progression of a proposal to Stage 2 or 3, prior to the signing of any agreement, and prior to provision of any Council funding.

 

The required approval process will be described to the proponent.

Council has the following responsibilities:

 

 Receive Community Initiated Capital Works Proposals.

 Undertake an initial compliance check and determine whether the project is simple or complex.

 Act as contact point for Proponents.

 Facilitate interactions between the Proponent and Council.

 Facilitate the preparation of information provided to the Proponent.

 Co-ordinate assessment, including input from advisers.

 Co-ordinate preparation of Reports to Council.

 Prepare participation agreements if required.

 Provide advice on any grant application to be submitted

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4 THE PROCESS

4.1 Introduction

This section outlines a three stage assessment process for the consideration of Community Initiated Capital Works Proposals. It is recognised that the nominated stages may be refined in order to most effectively manage the assessment of any particular proposal. For example, each stage may include a number of milestones to be achieved in order to prevent unnecessary expenditure and to provide confidence for the Proponent to continue. Any milestones or changes to the stages will be discussed and agreed with the Proponent.

4.2 Stage 1 – Concept Review and Submission of Proposal

Objective

 

For the Proponent to determine the eligibility of their proposal: If the proposal meets the criteria requirements, a submission is made to Council.

 

Timing

 

It is recognised that there may be numerous discussions at many levels between the proponent and Council stakeholders in order to ascertain Council needs and to better understand the business environment. These are informal discussions and are outside the realm of this Guide.

 

Proponent responsibilities

 

Preparing a submission: The proposal needs to be developed to a stage where the key inputs and outcomes have been identified, key assumptions and requirements of Council are clear, and other key elements have been identified. In particular, the unique ability of the proponent to deliver the proposal should be demonstrated and documented including the funding plan.

 

Council responsibilities

 

Where Council is of the view that there is little prospect of the criteria being met, it will communicate this to the proponent. In such circumstances, Council reserves the right not to advance assessment of the proposals to Stage 2 assessment as set out below.

 

Outcomes

 

The following outcomes may result from this stage:

   The Submission is presented to Council.

 The Submission assessed for compliance against initial checklist.

 The Submission is approved to progress to Stage 2.

 The Submission is not approved.

 The Submission is not approved, but the Proponent will be afforded an opportunity to provide further information as requested by Council for re-assessment.

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4.3 Stage 2 – Strategic Assessment

Objective

 

For Council to undertake a Preliminary and Strategic Assessment of the proposal to determine if the submission constitutes an unsolicited capital works proposal and if sufficient justification exists to justify direct dealing and therefore undertake a Stage 2 assessment.

Council reserves the right to further consider, or not consider, Unsolicited Capital Works Proposals beyond this stage at its absolute discretion.

 

Proponent responsibilities

 

During Stage 2, the Proponent is responsible for:

   Forwarding the Submission to Council.

 

 Identification of key elements of the proposal.

 

 Identifying a linkage to Council’s plans and strategies such as the Open Space Strategy, The Hills Shire Plan and Capital Works Program.

 

 Responding to requests for further information. The information to be provided will depend on the size and complexity of the proposed project.

 

Council responsibilities

 

During Stage 2, Council is responsible for:

 

 Promptly acknowledging receipt of the Submission.

 

 Undertaking an initial compliance check to ensure the required information has been provided.

 

 Requesting further information from the Proponent if required. This may involve clarification meetings with the Proponent in order to promote clarity of Council requirements.

 

 Undertaking a Preliminary Assessment that will be based on the potential for the proposal to satisfactorily meet the Assessment Criteria.

 

 Undertaking a Strategic Assessment that will be based on the potential for the proposal to satisfactorily meet the Assessment Criteria.

 

 Approval or non-approval can be granted by the General Manager at Stage 2 under delegated authority.

 If approved, progress to Stage 3 (Complex Projects).

 

 Approval for project implementation (no further stage required – Simple Proposals only).

 

 Notification of the Preliminary Assessment outcome to the Proponent.

 

Outcomes

 

The following outcomes may result from this stage:

 

 The Submission is approved for implementation (project value less than $250,000).

 The Submission is considered suitable for progression to Stage 3 (project value above $250,000).

 The Submission is not approved.

 The Submission is not approved, but the Proponent may be afforded an opportunity to provide further information as requested by Council for re-assessment.

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4.4 Stage 3 – Detailed Proposal and Recommendation

Objective

 

For the Proponent and Council to work co-operatively in the development and assessment of a Detailed Proposal, which may require a degree of preliminary negotiation on key issues, subject to the nature of the proposal.

 

Proponent responsibilities

 

During Stage 3, the Proponent will:

 

 Provide detailed plans and approvals of the proposal.

 

 Provide evidence of project costing.

 

 Provide funding details including evidence of their own contribution, other funding contributions and approved grants.

 

 Details of any approvals necessary for the proposed project, or demonstrate that approvals are not required.

 

Council responsibilities

 During Stage 3, Council will:

 

 Establish a Capital Works Proposal Assessment Panel.

 

 Enter into a Participation/Project Delivery Agreement (Contract).

   Commit appropriately experienced and qualified resources to participate in the Stage 3 process.

 

 Provide further information to the Proponent to assist with proposal.

 

 Receive Detailed or further information from the Proponent as required.

 

 Undertake assessment of the Detailed Proposal (by the Assessment Panel) against each of the Assessment Criteria.

 

 Prepare a Report with recommendations to the Council.

 

 Council resolution to approve or not approve the project proposal.

 

Outcomes

 

The following outcomes may result from this stage:

 

 The Proposal is considered acceptable to be reported to Council.

 

 The Detailed Proposal is not considered suitable for further consideration.

 

 If approved, appropriate procurement policy and procedure to be followed.

 

Disclosure

 

At the end of Stage 3, Council resolutions will be placed upon Council’s website.

 

Further information may be published as appropriate. Council will consult with the Proponent before any information is disclosed to ensure that commercially sensitive information remains confidential.

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5 PROCESS FLOWCHART

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6 SCHEDULE OF INFORMATION

This form is to be completed by the Proponent in presenting a Community Initiated Capital Works Proposal to Council. Please ensure all sections of this form are adequately addressed. Information may be presented in the form of cross referenced addenda if preferred.

 

An initial version of this schedule should be prepared prior to the formal “Pre-lodgement”

meeting with Council.

 

 

Organisation Name:

 

Address:

 

 

Contact person details:

 

Date of submission

 

 

Concise title and abstract of proposal (approx. 200 words)

 

Short Title

 

Abstract

 

Proposal details

 

i. Objectives of the proposal  

ii. Method of approach  

iii. Nature and extent of anticipated outcomes  

iv. Benefits the proposal will bring to the State

   

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Assessment Criteria

 

Please provide a brief description of how the proposal would meet each of the assessment criteria. Refer to section 2.3 of the Guidelines for detailed description of each criteria and items to be addressed.

1. Value for money

2. Whole of Council impact 3. Return on investment 4. Capability and capacity 5. Affordability

6. Risk allocation

 

Financial details

 

Please provide a brief description of the financial details of the proposal and the proponent’s financial capacity to deliver the proposal.

PROJECT TOTAL AMOUNT

$ Applicant Funding

Amount

$ Applicant Funding

Confirmed

YES / NO Council Funding

Amount

$ Council Funding

Confirmed

YES / NO Grant Funding Amount $

Grant Funding Confirmed

YES / NO Other Funding Amount $

Other Funding Sources (please specify)

Other Funding Confirmed

YES / NO Comments

   

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Costs and Requirements of Council

 

Please provide details of costs to Council.

 Clearly explain the requirements of Council emerging from the proposal (what are you seeking from Council?). This may include legislative/regulatory amendments, finance or the use of Council assets, facilities, equipment, materials, personnel, resources and land.

What would be the cost of Council providing this? (e.g. what would be the value of the Council land?)

 

Timeframe   

Please identify your proposed start and completion date (month and year) for the  project. 

  Start: 

 

Completion: 

   

Risks

 

Please provide a list of proponent and Council risks.

       

This proposal is to be signed by a representative of the Proponent authorised to represent and contractually bind the Proponent.

 

   

Name:

 

   

Position:

 

   

Signature:

 

   

Date:

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7 SUBMISSION CHECKLIST

The following checklist should be completed prior to the formal “Pre-Lodgement”

meeting with Council.

 

   

YES   NO

 

1  Have you completed the initial Schedule of Information Requirements?

   

 2  Are you the only party that could deliver your proposal?

   

 

3  Have you fully costed your proposed project?

   

 

4  Is your project 100% funded?    

 

5  Are you requested funding input from Council for this project?

   

 

6  Is Council owner of the land for your proposed project?

   

 

7  Is this project identified in any Council Plan or Strategy?

   

 

8  Have you identified a timing schedule?    

 

9 If you answered “NO” to any questions, have you documented in the (initial) Schedule of

Information Requirements the basis you believe Council should consider your proposal, given that it is likely it does not meet basic all the criteria as set out in the Guide.

Note – in some cases Council may recognise merit in your proposal, but want to ask the market to confirm value for money.

   

 

References

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