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Digital Library Digital Library

Department of Fisheries annual reports Annual reports

2011

Department of Fisheries Annual Report to the Parliament 2010/11 Department of Fisheries Annual Report to the Parliament 2010/11

Government of Western Australian Fisheries Department

Follow this and additional works at: https://researchlibrary.agric.wa.gov.au/ar_fish Part of the Aquaculture and Fisheries Commons

Recommended Citation Recommended Citation

Government of Western Australian Fisheries Department. (2011), Department of Fisheries Annual Report to the Parliament 2010/11. Western Australian Department of Fisheries, Perth. Book.

This book is brought to you for free and open access by the Annual reports at Digital Library. It has been accepted for inclusion in Department of Fisheries annual reports by an authorized administrator of Digital Library. For more information, please contact [email protected].

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DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES ANNUAL REPORT TO THE PARLIAMENT

2010/11

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To The hon. noRMAn FReDeRICK MooRe MLC BA DIP eD MInIsTeR FoR FIsheRIes

Department of Fisheries Major Metropolitan and Regional Locations

Head Office

3rd Floor, The Atrium 168 St. Georges Terrace Perth WA 6000

Telephone: (08) 9482 7333 Facsimile: (08) 9482 7389 Website: www.fish.wa.gov.au Email: [email protected]

Metropolitan Regional Office

14 Capo d’Orlando Drive South Fremantle WA 6162 Telephone: (08) 9432 8000 Facsimile: (08) 9432 8060

Southern Regional Office

Suite 7 Frederick House 70-74 Frederick Street Albany WA 6330

Telephone: (08) 9845 7400 Facsimile: (08) 9845 7457

Mid-West Regional Office

69-75 Connell Road Geraldton WA 6530

Telephone: (08) 9921 6800 Facsimile: (08) 9921 3617

Gascoyne Regional Office

82 Olivia Terrace Carnarvon WA 6701

Telephone: (08) 9941 1185 Facsimile: (08) 9941 1951

Northern Regional Office

Port of Pearls House 401 Port Drive Broome WA 6725

Telephone: (08) 9193 8600 Facsimile: (08) 9193 8699

WA Fisheries and Marine Research Laboratories

39 Northside Drive Hillarys WA 6025

Telephone: (08) 9203 0111 Facsimile: (08) 9203 0199

Published by the Department of Fisheries, 3rd Floor, The Atrium,

168 St. Georges Terrace PERTH WA 6000. www.fish.wa.gov.au ABN 55 689 794 771

ISSN 1833-198X Cover image: Mangrove jack (Lutjanus argentimaculatus) among mangrove roots in the

Pilbara/Kimberley (North Coast Bioregion) Photo: Shannon Conway.

Sir

In accordance with Section 61 of the Financial Management Act 2006 (FMA) and Section 263 of the Fish Resources Management Act 1994 (FRMA), I submit for your information the Annual Report to Parliament of the Department of Fisheries of Western Australia for the financial year ending 30 June 2011.

The Department also produces a companion State of the Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Report, as required by Section 263 of the FRMA. This Annual Report also includes a table on stock status and catch ranges for major commercial fisheries, derived from the State of the Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Report.

Stuart Smith Norman Moore,

Minister for Fisheries

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CONteNtS

SummAry of the yeAr ... 1

From the Chief Executive Officer ... 2

Highlights At-a-Glance 2010/11 ... 8

Stock Status and Catch Ranges for Major Commercial Fisheries ... 10

Financial Overview ... 16

Fish Pies (and Other Graphs) ... 38

overvIew of AgeNcy ... 46

Profile of the Department of Fisheries ... 47

Operating Environment – Significant Issues Impacting the Agency ... 51

Operational Structure ... 53

Corporate Executive ... 55

Performance Management Framework ... 60

AgeNcy PerformANce ... 65

Agency Performance – Overview ... 66

Service 1 – Fisheries Management ... 67

Service 2 – Compliance and Education ... 73

Rock Lobster in Focus – the transition to quota management and the low recruitment of young lobsters ...79

Recreational Fisheries Management in Focus ...83

Aboriginal community commercial fishing: the Western Australian trochus Fishery ...88

Service 3 – Research and Monitoring ... 90

Research and Monitoring in Focus – Scientists join forces to investigate marine heatwave and climate variability ...97

Service 4 – Marine Safety Service ... 100

Corporate Services ... 101

dIScloSureS ANd legAl comPlIANce ... 106

Independent Audit Opinion on Financial Statements and Key Performance Indicators ... 107

Certification of financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2011 ... 108

Other Financial Disclosures ... 137

Detailed Key Performance Indicators ... 140

Other Legal Requirements ... 156

Government Policy Requirements ... 162

APPeNdIceS ... 165

Advisory Committees ... 166

Major Publications Produced by the Department of Fisheries during 2010/11 ... 167

Legislative Amendments and New Legislation ... 170

State Register of Authorisations, Exemptions and Aquaculture Leases ... 179

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SUMMARy OF THE yEAR

SUMMARy OF THE yEAR

From the Chief Executive Officer ___________________________________________________________ 2 Highlights At-a-Glance 2010/11 ___________________________________________________________ 8 Stock Status and Catch Ranges for Major Commercial Fisheries ______________________________10 Financial Overview _____________________________________________________________________16 Fish Pies (and Other Graphs) ____________________________________________________________38

The Department of Fisheries is the lead agency for WA’s marine environment, in addition to managing our fisheries and aquaculture. 6,800 ships enter WA ports annually and can bring with them invasive marine pests on their hulls or in ballast water. In 2010/11, funding was announced to enable the Department to raise awareness of biosecurity issues and carry out associated research. Pictured: (centre) blue striped sea perch (Lutjanus kasmira) at the Rowley Shoals. Photo: Shannon Conway

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From the Chief executive Officer

Western Australians are fortunate that after nearly two centuries of rural, urban and industrial development in the State, the vast majority of its marine environment remains in excellent shape supporting healthy fisheries. Similarly, Western Australia’s major river systems, while affected by this development, still provide quality fishing opportunities throughout the year.

However, these marine and riverine ecosystems have been placed under stress in recent decades owing to a growing population. During the last 30 years, the State’s population has increased by almost one million people to 2.25 million. This growth has put significant pressures on the State’s fish resources and their environments from related factors

including increasing coastal residential development, discarded plastics, the emergence of new industries, increased shipping, new port development, offshore energy production, growing boat ownership and the proliferation of affordable fish-finding technology such as echo sounders and global positioning systems.

As a result, the management of the State’s wildstock fisheries has become a more complex

task. With Western Australia’s population projected to nearly double again over the next 40 years, the complexity of this challenge is expected to increase even more. This growth will lead to even greater competition among users of the marine environment for oil and gas production, port development and expansion, marine reserves and aquaculture. The environmental impacts of global population growth and the related increasing consumption of renewable and non-renewable resources are also likely to result in increased local environmental pressures.

Against this background of accelerated social, economic and environmental change, the year in review was both challenging and rewarding, as the Department worked with the community to ensure the continuing sustainability of Western Australia’s fish resources and their habitats.

Overall, the State’s fisheries remain in healthy condition, with stock assessments undertaken during the course of the year showing that 32 of the 36 managed fisheries have breeding stocks considered to be satisfactory. Of the other managed fisheries, the Department is taking action in the West Coast Demersal Gillnet and Demersal Longline

SUMMARy OF THE yEAR FROM THE CHIEF ExECUTIvE OFFICER

Stuart Smith, Chief Executive Officer of the Department of Fisheries

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Fishery (commonly known as the West Coast shark fishery), the West Coast Demersal Scalefish Fishery (targeting dhufish, pink snapper, breaksea cod) and the Northern Shark Fishery to address sustainability issues. The Department is also undertaking further research to determine the sustainability status of the commercial herring fishery on WA’s south coast.

The highest priority for the Department in 2010/11 was the progression of measures to secure the long-term sustainability of the western rock lobster fishery, following the dramatic decline

in observed recruitment of juveniles to the fishery three years ago. The measures included a reduction in the total allowable commercial catch to 5,500 tonnes (roughly half of the long-term average annual catch) and the introduction of a catch limit (or quota) for each pot (or unit) permitted to be used in the West Coast Rock Lobster Managed Fishery.

The introduction of a unit catch limit was a significant milestone in transitioning the fishery from an input-controlled fishery (based on the

number of allowable pots, as it operated prior to the 2009/10 season), to a full Individual Transferable Quota system (based on the weight of rock lobster that may be taken by authorisation holders) as will apply in the 2013/14 fishing year.

The move to pot catch limits created a number of challenges and obligations on both the industry and the Department of Fisheries. The Department needed to design a robust management and compliance strategy that was also capable of

accommodating the practicalities of an industry that requires some licensees to continue to land their catch in remote locations. This strategy involved considerable effort from all areas of the Department and industry in determining new rules for the

fishery, the design and printing of new catch and disposal records for use by industry, the drafting of substantial amendments to the fishery management plan and running a number of workshops to inform industry about the new rules prior to the start of the 2010/11 fishing season.

The West Coast rock lobster fishery will operate under a fully Individual Transferable Quota system in the 2013/14 fishing year.

Photo: Henrique Kwong SUMMARy OF THE yEAR FROM THE CHIEF ExECUTIvE OFFICER

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From an industry perspective, fishers were required to rapidly understand the new management settings, adjust their fishing gear and the containers used to transport lobster, and adhere to strict

fishing activity and catch landing, disposal and receiving reporting requirements. However, the new management arrangements have provided western rock lobster fishers with the opportunity to maximise the prices they receive for their product by redirecting fishing effort from the high-volume, low- price ‘white’ lobsters at the start of the season to a more even fishing spread throughout the year.

The commercial season for western rock lobster was also extended by two months until 31 August 2011, with fishing permitted seven-days- a-week during the final months to provide fishers with ample opportunity to catch their full quota. The educative and cooperative approach adopted by fishers and the Department during this transition to quota has been the key to the successful progress already made.

Significantly, the Department’s strategies for increasing the breeding stock and recruitment of juveniles into the fishery have passed the annual audit of the independent Marine Stewardship Council. The Department and the Western Rock Lobster Council have completed all the requirements for re-certification of the West Coast Rock Lobster Managed Fishery as a sustainably managed fishery for the next five years, subject to it meeting annual audit requirements. For more

information on the management of this fishery, please see the ‘Rock Lobster in Focus’ section of this Annual Report.

Another major achievement during the year was the commencement of new management arrangements for the Gascoyne Demersal

Scalefish Fishery to provide an integrated fisheries management framework for demersal (living at or near the bottom of the water) scalefish in the southern Gascoyne. The new fishery incorporates the pre-existing Shark Bay Snapper Fishery, the offshore demersal scalefish stocks and 27 nautical miles of previously open access fishery adjacent to Coral Bay. In addition to existing pink snapper quota entitlement, licence holders will also now receive non-pink snapper demersal scalefish entitlement, providing increased economic value and flexibility for operators.

The aquaculture industry has had a number of exciting developments during the year. After obtaining the necessary environmental approval, Marine Produce Australia increased its production to 1,000 tonnes of barramundi per annum from its farm in Cone Bay in the Kimberley and is now seeking approval to gradually expand its production capability to 5,000 tonnes per annum. The company produces high-quality barramundi that command a premium price in Australian markets.

In the Pilbara Region, Aurora Algae has started a demonstration project culturing marine micro-algae near Karratha. Aurora selected the

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site following a global search for the ideal location to commercialise its technology, which uses

marine algae to convert waste carbon dioxide from industrial processes into three products: biofuel for use in the mining sector; protein-rich biomass for use in manufactured animal feeds; and omega-3 oils for human nutrition. The company is planning for significant increases in scale and production capability in the future.

In the Mid-West Region, Cognis Australia is developing the commercial production of artemia (commonly known as brine shrimp) at Hutt Lagoon, Port Gregory. Research staff from the Department of Fisheries helped develop and build sophisticated filtration, aeration and harvesting systems to suit the high volume of water passing through the facility, which is a world-first in the commercial tank production of artemia. The project won the

‘Developing the Economy’ category of the 2010 Premier’s Awards.

Apart from managing the State’s fisheries and aquaculture, the Department is also the lead agency for the management of the State’s marine environment. During the year the Department received additional funding of $9.4 million over two years (2011/12 and 2012/13) that will enable it to better protect the State’s marine environment from the threat of invasive marine species that can enter WA in the ballast water or on the hulls of the 6,800 ships entering WA ports annually. The funding will enable the Department to raise awareness of

marine biosecurity issues, carry out research to identify better methods of in-water inspection and hull cleaning, and increase the number of vessel and port inspections carried out.

Significant resources of the Department have been applied to the marine reserves planning process being undertaken by government at both the State and Commonwealth level, with the aim of achieving balanced environmental, social and economic outcomes for the Department’s stakeholders.

An estimated 80 per cent of Western Australian state waters would now meet

In 2010/11 it was announced the Department of Fisheries would receive $9.4 million to better protect WA from invasive marine species, which can enter WA on ship hulls or in ballast water.

SUMMARy OF THE yEAR FROM THE CHIEF ExECUTIvE OFFICER

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International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) criteria for classification as marine protected areas under the Conservation and Land Management Act 1984 and the Fish Resources Management Act 1994. In State waters additional marine reserves are being planned for the

Kimberley and in the South West ‘Capes’ area. At the same time the Commonwealth is in the process of implementing a system of marine reserves

beyond the State three-nautical-mile-limit in waters stretching from the Northern Territory to the South Australian border.

A very strong Leeuwin Current and unusually high water temperatures – in some places the highest-ever recorded – contributed to a number of marine ‘fish kills’ over the 2010/11 summer, with abalone deaths reported near the Greenough River mouth and in the waters north of Kalbarri.

Fish kills were also recorded in Jurien Bay and Leeman and coral bleaching was observed at the Abrolhos Islands. The strength of the Leeuwin Current also saw many tropical species extend their range as far south as Albany over the summer months.

To help us better understand the likely causes and significance of this unusual event the Department convened a workshop of more than 80 marine scientists and managers from organisations including the Department of Environment and Conservation, the CSIRO, the Australian Institute of Marine Science and the Department of Fisheries.

In addition, a joint Department of Fisheries/CSIRO project to closely examine climate change effects on Western Australia’s marine environment was commenced.

Implementation of a new fee-setting model applying a royalty-like access fee of 5.75 per cent of the gross value of production (GVP) for each commercial fishery commenced on 1 July 2010.

This new approach removes the inequity evident under the old model where some licence fees were as high as 20 per cent of the GVP of the fishery, while others were as low as one per cent.

Importantly, the new model moves away from cost recovery, where the bulk of the Department’s revenue was tied to the level of service provision in the State’s major fisheries – West Coast Rock Lobster, Shark Bay Scallop, Shark Bay Prawn, Exmouth Gulf Prawn, pearling and, to a lesser extent, abalone – with limited funding available to address sustainability issues of other fisheries.

In future, all revenue raised through

commercial access fees will be able to be directed to commercial fisheries research, management and compliance projects of the greatest need, with the exception of funds allocated to the Commonwealth’s Fisheries Research and

Development Corporation (0.25 per cent of GVP) for fisheries research and to the WA Fishing Industry Council (0.5 per cent of GVP).

In 2010/11 the commercial fishing industry contributed $19.8 million in access fees.

SUMMARy OF THE yEAR FROM THE CHIEF ExECUTIvE OFFICER

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The year also saw the first full year’s

implementation of changes to recreational fishing management arrangements, including a new fee applicable when fishing from a powered recreational vessel. All State funding and fees received for recreational fishing licences flowing from the revised arrangements is spent on research, management and compliance in the State’s recreational fisheries.

The new funding has so far been used to improve compliance with recreational fishing rules by purchasing and deploying six new mobile fisheries patrol vehicles, increasing support for Recfishwest as the peak body representing recreational

fishers, exploring the potential of artificial reefs, progressing fish stocking programs in the Kimberley, and delivering recreational fishing guides and

information to a broad network of tackle shops and other retail outlets.

In 2010/11 the recreational fishing sector contributed $6.1 million to the cost of managing the State’s recreational fisheries.

The Government’s legislative reform agenda was also progressed, with two acts clarifying the scope of the Department’s fee-setting powers being passed by the Parliament. A further bill proposing a number of amendments to the Fish Resources Management Act 1994 was introduced into the Parliament. The bill provides an improved administrative and legislative framework for the sustainable management of aquaculture and the State’s fish resources. Work also continued on the

development of new legislation to replace the Fish Resources Management Act 1994 and the Pearling Act 1990.

I would like to acknowledge the full range of stakeholders that have worked with the Department and contributed to positive initiatives throughout the course of 2010/11. I would also like to acknowledge the professionalism and dedication of the staff and executive team in their efforts to ensure the sustainability of our fisheries and the aquatic environment. My thanks also go to the Minister for Fisheries, the Hon. Norman Moore MLC and his staff for the guidance and support provided during the year.

Stuart Smith

Chief Executive Officer

SUMMARy OF THE yEAR FROM THE CHIEF ExECUTIvE OFFICER

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Highlights At-a-Glance 2010/11

Key achievements for the Department of Fisheries in 2010/11 included:

Successful implementation of a total allowable commercial catch for the West Coast Rock Lobster Managed Fishery and the start of the transition to an Individual Transferrable Quota system of catch management commencing in the 2013/14 fishing season.

New management arrangements commenced for the Gascoyne Demersal Scalefish Fishery, which incorporates the Shark Bay Snapper Fishery, offshore demersal scalefish stocks and 27 nautical miles of previously open access fishery adjacent to Coral Bay.

A number of new recreational fishing initiatives were started using funds derived from the new Recreational Fishing from Boat Licence, including increased research, progressing fish restocking and artificial reefs, and the most comprehensive recreational fishing survey ever conducted in WA.

The Department’s state-wide education program won the Science Outreach Initiative

prize at the 2010 Western Australian Science Awards. The education program delivers marine science education to teachers, school students and the community and operates from the Naturaliste Marine Discovery Centre (NMDC) at Hillarys and in regional locations including Broome, Carnarvon, Geraldton, Busselton, Bunbury, Albany and Esperance, and Christmas Island and Cocos-Keeling Islands.

Investment, innovation and growth was achieved in the State’s aquaculture industry through an establishment of the brine shrimp aquaculture project at Hutt Lagoon north of Geraldton, increased barramundi production at Cone Bay in the Kimberley and the

establishment of a demonstration project that cultures marine micro-algae near Karratha.

Marine biosecurity funding was boosted, enabling the Department to better protect the State’s marine environment from the threat of invasive marine species entering WA in the ballast water or on the hulls of the 6,800 ships that visit WA ports annually.

SUMMARy OF THE yEAR HIgHLIgHTS AT-A-gLANCE 2010/11

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Research by the Department of Fisheries during 2010/11 has shown that new rules to protect iconic demersal scalefish species such as dhufish, pink snapper and baldchin groper have been successful, with the desired 50 per cent catch reduction almost being achieved.

Sea lion pups at the Abrolhos Islands are better protected under new rules requiring the use of Sea Lion Exclusion Devices (SLEDs) for western rock lobster fishers operating in the Abrolhos’

Easter and Pelsaert groups. Mandatory SLEDs for rock lobster pots were first introduced in 2006 to protect sea lion breeding colonies between Lancelin and Dongara.

Deployment of six satellite-linked drifters between Cape Leeuwin and Cape Naturaliste

will help the Department to learn more about the important Capes Current, which is believed to be vital in carrying and dispersing eggs and larvae of summer-spawning fish, such as the popular Western Australian dhufish. The project is funded by the Western Australian Marine Science Institution.

A Memorandum of Understanding signed by Western Australia and China provides access for the Department of Fisheries to China’s vast experience in artificial reef technology while China will benefit from the Department’s expertise in the policy development,

monitoring and compliance components of fisheries management.

Satellite-linked drifting buoys are being used to learn more about the Capes Current, which appears vital in dispersing the eggs and larvae of the WA dhufish (pictured). Photo: Henrique Kwong

SUMMARy OF THE yEAR HIgHLIgHTS AT-A-gLANCE 2010/11

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Stock Status and Catch Ranges for Major Commercial Fisheries

the information in this table is derived from more detailed data presented in the companion report, State of the Fisheries and Aquatic Resources.

the fisheries referred to in the table are the management units that are either fully managed fisheries or are in the process of having dedicated management plans developed for them.

Full information on the current management status and future directions of commercial fisheries, recreational fisheries and aquaculture industries is given in the State of the Fisheries and Aquatic Resources report.

Figure 1. Summary of major commercial fisheries in regard to an assessment of their breeding stocks during 2010/11.

Satisfactory Inadequate

Note: The ‘Satisfactory’ category (34 fisheries) includes those fisheries where the breeding stocks are adequate and three major commercial fisheries whose breeding stocks are recovering, while the ‘Inadequate’ category includes two fisheries where additional actions need to be taken to ensure the breeding stocks are either adequate or recovering.

SUMMARy OF THE yEAR STOCk STATUS AND CATCH RANgES FOR MAjOR COMMERCIAL FISHERIES

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table 1. Stock Status and Catch Ranges for Major Commercial Fisheries

fishery Stock

assessment complete

Breeding stock assessment

target catch (and effort) range in

tonnes (days)

catch (tonnes)

for season reported1 Season reported1

catch (or effort)

level acceptable

comments on performance in reported season

West Coast Bioregion West coast

rock lobster Yes Adequate 5,500 ± 10% catch

limit for season 5,899 (includes Windy

Harbour and Augusta) 2009/10 Yes Total Allowable Commercial Catch (TACC) of 5,500 tonnes

± 10% set for the 2009/10 season to accommodate the recent series of low puerulus settlements.

Roe’s abalone Yes Adequate 101.8 (Quota management) (530 – 640 days)

91.4 (567 days)

2010 Yes Effort range adjusted downward by 15% from previous range (620 – 750 days) to account for increased efficiency in the fishery.

Octopus Yes Adequate 50 – 250 174 2010 Yes Fishery in developing phase. Target range to be reviewed

when additional information is available.

Abrolhos Islands and mid-west trawl

Yes Adequate 95 – 1,830 806 2010 Yes Total landings were well within the acceptable range.

There were areas of high scallop abundance but, due to some areas of small-size scallop meat, the stock was not fished to its full potential catch.

Cockburn Sound

crab Yes Recovering NA 56 2009/10 NA The fishery re-opened for the first time in three years,

due to continuing recovery of the breeding stock and improving recruitment.

Deep sea crab Yes Adequate 154 (Quota

management) 145 2010 Yes Total Allowable Commercial Catch began in 2008 so an

acceptable effort range is yet to be determined.

Estuarine finfish

(west coast) No NA 75 – 220

(Peel-Harvey only) 125 (PH) 2010 Yes Catches of west coast estuarine finfish have been stable since 2000.

West coast

beach bait Yes Adequate 60 – 275

(whitebait only) 101 (whitebait only) 2010 Yes Yearly fluctuations in whitebait catch still match environmental variations.

West coast

purse seine Yes Adequate 0 – 3,000 (Quota

management) 10 2010 NA Continued low catches due to market competition,

irregular availability of fish and low fishing effort levels.

West coast demersal scalefish

Yes Recovering < 449 – 469 (All Demersal Scalefish)

< 450 (Demersal Suite)

421

340 – West Coast Demersal Scalefish (Interim) Managed Fishery 81 – Other fisheries, including West Coast Demersal Gillnet and Longline (Interim) Managed Fishery

2010 (WCDSF), 2009/10 (Other)

Yes Total catches of demersal scalefish have now been reduced by at least 50% of those of 2005/06. This level of reduction is expected to sufficiently decrease fishing mortality to allow rebuilding of the resource, so the stock is deemed to be recovering. The next stock assessment (in 2012/13) will determine whether this expected recovery has translated into a longer term likelihood of the resource being at, or rebuilding to, an adequate level.

1 Catch figures supplied for latest year/season available. NA Not assessed.

SUMMARy OF THE yEAR STOCk STATUS AND CATCH RANgES FOR MAjOR COMMERCIAL FISHERIES

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fishery Stock

assessment complete

Breeding stock assessment

target catch (and effort) range in

tonnes (days)

catch (tonnes)

for season reported1 Season reported1

catch (or effort)

level acceptable

comments on performance in reported season

Gascoyne Coast Bioregion

Shark Bay prawn Yes Adequate 1,501 – 2,330 1,545 2010 Yes King and tiger prawns were within the historical target range.

Exmouth Gulf prawn

Yes Adequate 771 – 1,276 779 2010 Yes The total catch was in the target range but catches of

king prawns were below their individual target level.

Shark Bay

scallop Yes Adequate 1,250 – 3,000 1,592 2010 Yes The scallop catch was within the target range.

Shark Bay crabs Yes Adequate Under development 852 2009/10 NA Catch comes from a dedicated trap fishery and by- product from prawn trawling. Due to recent increases in total catches, a more detailed assessment is being undertaken.

Shark Bay beach seine and mesh net

Yes Adequate 235 – 335 249 2010 Yes Total catch was similar to 2009 while total effort

declined slightly. Catch rates of key species were generally maintained.

Shark Bay snapper

Yes Recovering 277 (Quota

management) (380 – 540 days)

263 (432 days)

plus 63 recreational catch

2010 Yes At current Total Allowable Commercial Catch levels, the spawning biomass is projected to recover to the target level by around 2014. The next assessment is currently scheduled for 2012.

North Coast Bioregion

Onslow prawn Yes Adequate 60 – 180 29 2010 Yes Tiger prawn landings were within the target catch range

but king and endeavour prawn landings were extremely low and below the target catch range. The low catch was associated with low fishing effort.

Nickol Bay prawn Yes Adequate 90 – 300 40 2010 Yes Catch of banana prawns were low but within the

projected catch range and at the lower end of the species target catch range. King and tiger prawn landings were very low due to limited targeting and low abundance.

Broome prawn Yes Adequate 55 – 260 3 2010 NA Very low level of effort this year.

Kimberley prawn Yes Adequate 240 – 500 256 2010 Yes Banana prawn catch was within target and projected

range. Tiger and endeavour prawns were slightly below target ranges due to low effort.

Kimberley gillnet

and barramundi Yes Adequate 25 – 40

(barramundi) 57 2010 No The 2009 and 2010 catches of barramundi were both

above the catch range, due to increased effort levels.

A more detailed assessment of these stocks may be required.

1 Catch figures supplied for latest year/season available. NA Not assessed.

SUMMARy OF THE yEAR STOCk STATUS AND CATCH RANgES FOR MAjOR COMMERCIAL FISHERIES

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fishery Stock

assessment complete

Breeding stock assessment

target catch (and effort) range in

tonnes (days)

catch (tonnes)

for season reported1 Season reported1

catch (or effort)

level acceptable

comments on performance in reported season Northern

demersal scalefish

Yes Adequate Total 600 – 1,000

(goldband < 501) (red emperor < 201)

Total 1,116 (goldband 522) (red emperor 141)

2010 Yes Total catch was above the upper limit by ~10%, which is acceptable. The catches of goldband snapper were ~5%

above the target while red emperor was ~30% below target. Catch ranges for this fishery need revision. A stock assessment due in 2012/2013 will inform this revision.

Pilbara fish trawl Yes Adequate 2,000 – 2,800 1,259 2010 No Reduced catch may partly be due to 20% reduction in

effort in Areas 1 and 2 in 2009 and new net designs that deal with bycatch issues. Cause is yet to be fully determined.

Pilbara demersal

trap and line Yes Adequate 400 – 600 (trap)

50 – 115 (line) 489 (trap)

117 (line) 2010 Yes The trap catch was within the acceptable range. The line catch is similar to 2009 however the catch of ruby snapper has increased for two consecutive years. A stock assessment will be undertaken in 2011.

Mackerel Yes Adequate 410 (Quota

management) 246 – 410 (all except grey mackerel)

284 2010 Yes Catch rates are increasing in the Gascoyne/West Coast

and Pilbara and stable in the Kimberley. As the quota is accumulated over three zones, a catch range will continue to be used to assess acceptability.

Northern shark Yes Sandbar shark:

Inadequate Blacktip shark:

Uncertain

< 20 (sandbar)

No catch reported. 2009/10 NA Previous management intervention reduced fishing effort to below target level, but catches of sandbar sharks in recent years far exceeded their sustainable annual limit so the breeding stock remains inadequate. No effort occurred this year.

Pearl oyster Yes Adequate 1,555,000 oysters (Quota management) (14,071 – 20,551 dive hours)

394,947 oysters (4,447

dive hours) 2010 Yes Pearl oyster catches are up from the previous year’s historical low, but still only 25% of Total Allowable Catch (TAC) due to exceptional abundance and market uncertainty.

Beche-de-mer Yes Adequate Sandfish 20 – 100 Redfish 40 – 150

Sandfish 35 Redfish 86

2010 Yes Species-specific indicators introduced for the first time in this fishery.

1 Catch figures supplied for latest year/season available. NA Not assessed.

SUMMARy OF THE yEAR STOCk STATUS AND CATCH RANgES FOR MAjOR COMMERCIAL FISHERIES

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fishery Stock

assessment complete

Breeding stock assessment

target catch (and effort) range in

tonnes (days)

catch (tonnes)

for season reported1 Season reported1

catch (or effort)

level acceptable

comments on performance in reported season

South Coast Bioregion South coast

crustacean No NA 50 – 80 (southern

rock lobster) 72.7 (southern rock lobster and deep sea crab combined)

2009/10 Yes The management arrangements, including the acceptable catch range, are currently being reviewed.

Abalone (greenlip/

brownlip)

Yes Adequate 213 (Quota

management) (907 – 1,339 days)

205

(1,196 days) 2010 Yes No issues.

Estuarine finfish

(south coast) Yes Adequate 200 – 500 223

+ 9 crab 2010 Yes Stock levels of key species are considered adequate.

WA salmon Yes Adequate 1,200 – 2,800 360 2010 Yes Recent catches continue to be low relative to historic

levels, due to low effort from limited market demand. A review of the target catch range is to be undertaken.

Australian

herring Yes Uncertain 475 – 1,200 (south

coast only) 183 (south coast only) 2010 Yes Commercial catch continues to be low relative to historic levels, due to poor recruitment and low effort levels resulting from poor markets. A review of the target catch range is to be undertaken.

Albany/King George Sound purse seine

Yes Adequate 2,683 (Quota

management)

1,796 2009/10 Yes Catches increased more than 30% from 2008/09 levels.

Stock levels are considered adequate and catch levels are acceptable.

Bremer Bay

purse seine Yes Adequate 1,500 (Quota

management) 422 2009/10 Yes Decline in effort and catch from 2008/09 but stock

considered to be recovering.

Esperance purse seine

Yes Adequate 1,500 (Quota

management)

429 2009/10 Yes Stock levels are considered adequate and catch levels are acceptable. Catches more than double that of 2008/09 but remains well below Total Allowable Catch.

Southern and west coast demersal gillnet and longline

Yes Gummy and

whiskery sharks:

Adequate.

Dusky sharks are anticipated to now be recovering.

Sandbar shark:

Inadequate

725 – 1,095 (key species only)

996 (key species only) 2009/10 Yes Previous management limited overall fishing effort to acceptable levels. Gummy shark catch exceeds their historical target range due to increasing catch rates;

dusky shark catches are within target range; whiskery catch slightly below acceptable range due to seasonal closure and effort reductions; catches of sandbar in the southern part of their distribution are acceptable.

1 Catch figures supplied for latest year/season available. NA Not assessed.

SUMMARy OF THE yEAR STOCk STATUS AND CATCH RANgES FOR MAjOR COMMERCIAL FISHERIES

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15

fishery Stock

assessment complete

Breeding stock assessment

target catch (and effort) range in

tonnes (days)

catch (tonnes)

for season reported1 Season reported1

catch (or effort)

level acceptable

comments on performance in reported season

Northern Inland Bioregion Lake Argyle

catfish Yes Adequate 95 – 155 Less than three licences

operated 2010 Yes Catch has declined due to reduced effort.

1 Catch figures supplied for latest year/season available. NA Not assessed.

SUMMARy OF THE yEAR STOCk STATUS AND CATCH RANgES FOR MAjOR COMMERCIAL FISHERIES

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SUMMARy OF THE yEAR FINANCIAL OvERvIEw 16

Financial Overview

the financial overview examines the trends in financial information from 2006/07 through to 2010/11. the analysis is based on the information provided in the Department of Fisheries’ audited statement of comprehensive income and statement of financial position.

The overview is provided to assist readers in

understanding the financial impact of decisions taken over that period to address emerging issues in the fisheries sector. These issues include:

Significant government funding to increase

compliance and research and compliance activity relating to recreational fishing, commercial fishing and marine park compliance.

Significant government support to increase the financial sustainability for commercial fisheries in Exmouth Gulf, Shark Bay and the Abrolhos Islands through the establishment and financing of Fisheries Adjustment Schemes.

Management of the recreational fishing sector through the introduction of revised management arrangements including the introduction of a Recreational Fishing from Boat Licence.

Significant government funding to invest in new assets or replace ageing assets to support the delivery of the Department’s services.

Increasing levels of employee leave liabilities.

The ‘Overview of Financial Flows’ figure below represents the various types of operating and capital funds received by the Department during the 2010/11 financial year, excluding any carry-overs and internal funds brought forward from 2009/10. The major elements of the Department’s operating expenditure (i.e. day-to-day activity) and capital expenditure for the 2010/11 year can also be seen next to the ‘Total Cost of Services’ chart.

Note that $m is used as an abbreviation for $million.

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17

2010-11 SUMMARY OVERVIEW OF FINANCIAL FLOWS

Service Appropriations

from State Government

$33m

Commercial Fisheries Access/

Application Fees

$20m Recreational

Fisheries Grants $6m and Other Income

$7m Operating Income ($m)

Employee Benefit Expenses

$41m

Supplies and Services

$21m

All Other Expenses

$10m

Operating Expenses ($m) DEPARTMENT

OF FISHERIES Capital contribution ($5.5m), Holding

account draw-downs and internal funds.

Operating Expenditure

Aquatic Management

$21m Compliance and Education

$27m

Research and Monitoring

$24m

Marine Safety

$4m

Total Cost of Services ($m) Information

Systems

$1,010k

Plant and Equipment

$1,784k Physical

Infrastructure

$1,716k Vessels

$827k

Capital Expenditure ($’000)

Total cost of services $72m Capital expenditure $5.3m

financial Summary 2010/11

Overview of financial flows

SUMMARy OF THE yEAR FINANCIAL OvERvIEw

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18

financial Performance

Financial performance can be identified by comparing ‘what’ and ‘where’ the Department spent against its income sources. The cost to the Government of the Department over the years can also be compared against the total cost of services and outcomes that the Department has delivered.

The following is a summary of the financial performance and position of the Department for the year ended 30 June 2011:

Total income excluding resources received free of charge decreased by three per cent ($65.7m in 2010/11; $67.5m in 2009/10), and operating expenses increased by three per cent ($71.8m in 2010/11; $69.5m in 2009/10). The agency’s net cost of services has therefore increased by two per cent ($38.8m in 2010/11; $38.05m in 2009/10).

total cost of services

Total cost of services facilitates an assessment of performance by showing the full cost of resources consumed in operations. It shows the total cost of operations to the State prior to recovery of costs through licence fees, user charges and independent sources of revenues.

The trend in the Department’s total cost of services since 2007 is shown in Figure 2a.

The Department’s total cost of services has increased by 34 per cent ($18m) since 2006/07.

Figure 2a. total cost of services – five-year trend

53,799

67,672 69,575 71,891

0 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000 70,000 80,000

2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11

YEAR

$ '000 Total Cost of Services (a)

5 Year Average 34%

60,400

table 2a.

totAl coSt of ServIceS –

5 yeAr treNd 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 5-year change

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 Total Cost of Services (a) 53,799 60,400 67,672 69,575 71,891 18,092 (a) Capital user charge removed from 2006/07 total cost of services for comparative purposes.

SUMMARy OF THE yEAR FINANCIAL OvERvIEw

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19

53,799 9,095 3,383 2,200

8,497 71,891

0 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000 70,000

$' 000

Total cost of services 2006/07 One-off expenditure decrease from 2006/07 Shared services and other savings harvests

Major policy decisions (a)

Cost escalation and award adjustments (b) One-off increase in employee long service leave entitlements (c) Services offset by revenue and

othercosts Total cost of services 2010/11

MAJOR FINANCIAL MOVEMENTS -2,032

-3,051

The cost of services is three per cent more than last year ($71.8m in 2010/11; $69.5m in 2009/10). This cost includes depreciation and non cash items consumed in delivering services.

The $18m increase in the Department’s total cost of services over the last five years ($71.9m in 2010/11; $53.8m in 2006/07) has been

significantly impacted by major financial movements illustrated in Figure 2b.

The figure shows the total cost of services in 2006/07 and the major financial movements that have contributed to the cumulative increase in the total cost of services ending in 2010/11.

Major policy decisions, an increase on demand for services, and cost escalations from Consumer Price Index-related increases and award adjustments are the largest contributors to the overall change in total cost of services.

The introduction of the Recreational Fishing from Boat Licence in 2010 has resulted in

additional activity in the area of recreational fishing.

This has further contributed to the increase in the total cost of services for 2010/11 under major financial movement ‘Major policy decisions’ (see Figure 2b and Table 2b) although recreational licence fees help recover a proportion of the increase in costs for the related activities.

See also Figure 2c and Table 2c for the list of major policy decisions that have impacted on total cost of services since 2006/07.

Figure 2b. Summary of major financial movements between total cost of services in 2006/07 and 2010/11

SummAry of mAJor fINANcIAl movemeNtS BetweeN totAl

coSt of ServIceS IN 2006/07 ANd 2010/11 $’000

Major policy decisions (a) 9,095

Cost escalation and award adjustments (b) 3,383

One-off increase in employee long service leave entitlements (c) 2,200

Services offset by revenue and other costs 8,497

Less

One-off expenditure decrease from 2006/07 (3,051)

Shared services and other savings harvests (2,032)

totAl 18,092

(a) See Table 1C for a list of policy decisions implemented over the last five years.

(b) Cost escalations are mainly due to non salary related costs whilst award adjustments have increased salary costs.

(c) See also notes with respect to Figure 21 ‘Employee Benefits Provision Ratio’.

table 2b.

SUMMARy OF THE yEAR FINANCIAL OvERvIEw

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20

Figure 2c. Major activity-based policy decisions – impact on total cost of services

Finfish compliance 23%

West Coast and Gascoyne scalefish research and monitoring 15%

Compliance resources 8%

Ningaloo, Nornalup and Walpole inlets marine parks 7%

Aquatic biosecurity 4%

Management arrangements for

recreational fishing 43%

table 2c.

mAJor ActIvIty-BASed PolIcy decISIoNS $’000 Management arrangements for recreational fishing 3,900

Finfish compliance 2,082

West Coast and Gascoyne scalefish research and monitoring 1,330

Compliance resources 742

Ningaloo, Nornalup and Walpole inlets marine parks 658

Aquatic biosecurity 383

totAl 9,095

SUMMARy OF THE yEAR FINANCIAL OvERvIEw

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21

Net cost of services

Net cost of services facilitates an assessment of performance by showing the net cost of resources consumed in operations. It shows the extent to which these costs were recovered through licence fees, user charges and independent sources of revenues, and the net cost of operations to the State.

The trend in the Department’s net cost of services since 2007 is shown in Figure 3.

The increase in the Department’s net cost of services, ($38.8m in 2010/11; $28.3m in 2006/07) is funded from Consolidated Account service appropriations and has been significantly impacted by the major financial movements as described at ‘Total Cost of Services’ (see Figure 2a and Table 2a).

28,336

32,898

38,666 38,058 38,831

0 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000 70,000 80,000

2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11

$ '000

0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 35,000 40,000 NET COST OF SERVICES ($'000) Revenues Other than Service Appropriations – (LHS)

Total Cost of Services (a) – (LHS) Net Cost of Services (RHS)

YEAR

Figure 3. Net cost of services – five-year trend

table 3.

Net coSt of ServIceS – 5-yeAr treNd 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 Total Cost of Services (a) – (LHS) 53,799 60,400 67,672 69,575 71,891 Revenues Other than Service Appropriations (LHS) 25,463 27,502 29,006 31,517 33,060

Net Cost of Services (RHS) 28,336 32,898 38,666 38,058 38,831

(a) Capital user charge removed from 2006/07 total cost of services for comparative purposes.

SUMMARy OF THE yEAR FINANCIAL OvERvIEw

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22

Income sources – 2010/11

Service appropriations from State Government fund 50 per cent of the Department’s recurrent day-to-day activity or operational costs as shown in Figure 4.

Figure 4. Income sources – 2010/11

Other 6.4%

Other Income (a) 5.6%

Interest 0.8%

External Grants and Contributions

4.5%

Recreational Fisheries

9.3%

Service Appropriations from

State Government 49.7%

Commercial Fisheries

30.1%

2010/11 ($65.83 MILLION)

table 4.

INcome SourceS 2010/11 2010/11 2010/11

$’000 %

Service Appropriations from State Government 32,770 49.7%

Commercial Fisheries 19,769 30.1%

Recreational Fisheries 6,123 9.3%

External Grants and Contributions 2,987 4.5%

Interest 491 0.8%

Other Income (a) 3,690 5.6%

totAl 65,830 100%

(a) Resources received free of charge are excluded from Income Sources.

SUMMARy OF THE yEAR FINANCIAL OvERvIEw

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23

Income sources – five-year trend

Total income excluding resources received free of charge decreased by three per cent ($65.7m in 2010/11; $67.5m in 2009/10) due mainly to a reduction in appropriation funding from the State Government.

Revenues from other sources come from the commercial fishing industry through access fees, recreational fishers, external funding for

research and management from the Commonwealth Government, and ‘Other Income’ (which includes interest from revenue). The amount of revenue received from independent sources has increased by five per cent ($33m in 2010/11; $31.5m in 2009/10).

Figure 5 presents an overview of the total revenue received over the last five financial years highlighting that, with the exception of fees paid by recreational fishers, contributions from other sources has remained constant in the past five years.

Figure 6 shows how non appropriation funding compared to total income received each year since 2006/07.

The increase in revenue from recreational fishers results from the revised recreational fishing arrangements introduced in 2010.

Figure 5. Income sources – five-year trend

0 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000 70,000 80,000

2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11

$' 000

Service Appropriations from State Government Commercial Fisheries

Recreational Fisheries External Grants and Contributions Other Income including Interest Revenue

5-Year Total:

$307.7M

YEAR

table 5.

INcome SourceS – 5-yeAr treNd 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 Service Appropriations from State Government 29,876 31,812 30,770 36,029 32,676

Commercial Fisheries 18,265 19,289 18,687 15,662 19,769

Recreational Fisheries 2,379 2,680 2,746 4,986 6,123

External Grants and Contributions 2,355 2,601 4,681 6,633 2,987 Other Income including Interest Revenue 2,464 2,932 2,892 4,236 4,181

totAl 55,339 59,314 59,776 67,546 65,736

SUMMARy OF THE yEAR FINANCIAL OvERvIEw

Figure

table 1.  Stock Status and Catch Ranges for Major Commercial Fisheries
Figure 2a.  total cost of services – five-year trend
Figure 2b. Summary of major financial movements between total cost of services  in 2006/07 and 2010/11
Figure 2c. Major activity-based policy decisions – impact on total cost of services
+7

References

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