• No results found

DRAFT SYLLABUS FOR CONSULTATION

N/A
N/A
Protected

Academic year: 2023

Share "DRAFT SYLLABUS FOR CONSULTATION "

Copied!
103
0
0

Loading.... (view fulltext now)

Full text

Standards NSW for and on behalf of the Crown in the law of the State of New South Wales. No part of the material may be reproduced in Australia or any other country by any process, electronic or otherwise, in any material form, or transmitted to any other person, or stored electronically in any form without the prior written permission of the Board of Studies, Teaching and Educational Standards NSW, except as permitted by the Copyright Act 1968. The development of the Stage 6 syllabuses involved expert writers and there was an opportunity for consultation with teachers and other interest groups across NSW to get the highest quality advice in the entire education community.

An overview of the BOSTES syllabus development process is available at http://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/syllabuses/syllabus-development. The purpose of the survey is to obtain detailed feedback from individuals and systems/organizations on the curriculum. The Stage 6 curricula reflect the principles of the BOSTES K–10 Curriculum Framework and Equity Statement of Principles, and the Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians (December 2008).

Gifted students have specific learning needs that may require adjustments to the pace, level, and content of the curriculum. EAL/D students are simultaneously learning a new language and the knowledge, understanding and skills of the Ancient History Stage 6 syllabus through that new language.

RATIONALE

The skills, knowledge and understanding that students acquire through the study of Ancient History provide a solid foundation for further study, the world of work and informed citizenship, and for lifelong learning.

THE PLACE OF THE ANCIENT HISTORY STAGE 6 DRAFT SYLLABUS IN THE K–12

In the NSW curriculum, the objective provides a concise statement of the overall purpose of the curriculum. The purpose, objectives, outcomes, and content of a curriculum are clearly linked and sequentially reinforce details of the intent of the curriculum. The study of Ancient History at Stage 6 enables students to develop knowledge and understanding of the ancient world, historical skills and values ​​and attitudes essential to an understanding of the ancient world; to develop a lifelong interest in the study of history; and to prepare them for informed and active citizenship in the modern world.

OBJECTIVES

KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING

SKILLS

VALUES AND ATTITUDES

OUTCOMES

AH11-6 Analyze and interpret different types of sources for evidence that support a historical account or argument. AH11-7 identifies and explains various interpretations and representations of past plans AH11-8 and performs history. AH11-9 communicates historical understanding using historical knowledge, concepts and terms in relevant and well-structured forms.

AH12-7 critically analyze and interpret different types of sources for evidence to support a historical account or argument AH12-8 explain and evaluate different interpretations and representations of the past AH12-9 plan and execute historically.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND REQUIREMENTS

Investigating Ancient History – 60 indicative hours (a) The nature, methods and issues of Ancient History

The table in the 'Ancient History Research - Case Studies' section of this syllabus provides options for case studies that schools may wish to use. Case studies should not overlap or substantially duplicate any topic attempted to be covered in Year 12 Ancient History or History Extension courses.

The Nature of the Ancient Past – 40 indicative hours

Historical Investigation – 20 indicative hours

ASSESSMENT

The new guidelines for school-based assessment provide specific advice on the number of formal assessment tasks, the components and weightings of subjects, and the nature of the types of tasks they will be. One assignment should be related to the topic "Personalities in their times" chosen with a weightage of 20–.

Cities of Vesuvius – Pompeii and Herculaneum Part A - Objective and short response questions

Historical Periods

CONTENT

LEARNING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM

The requirements of historical research include the ability to ask intelligent questions, to interrogate, select and reference sources, and to develop interpretations based on an evaluation of evidence and reasoning. Students identify potential weaknesses in their positions and analyze, evaluate and synthesize alternative interpretations and representations of the past. They develop an understanding of the issues involved in the use of ICT when practicing ethical scholarship as part of the historical research process.

Students gain knowledge of different cultural perspectives and roles and learn how these may change over time. the contemporary world. Students access historical content through a variety of print, oral, visual, spatial, and electronic forms, including inscriptions, reliefs, accounts of the past by ancient writers, photographs, films, artifacts, sites, and archived materials. Investigating the ancient world will allow students to further understand the rights and responsibilities of individuals and how this has changed in a variety of communities and over time.

An investigation of the living and working conditions of past people provides great insight into the cultural characteristics of past communities. Studying the occupations in which people of the past were engaged allows students to better understand the needs and desires of past peoples, their social status, education, and the values ​​of the community they were a part of.

ORGANISATION OF CONTENT

ANCIENT HISTORY YEAR 11 COURSE CONTENT

Case studies are inquiry-based studies of past societies, places, people, developments or concepts in ancient history. Case studies provide a historical context within which students can learn about relevant methods and issues. Teachers may wish to develop a further study of another community which may include either the same or an alternative key feature.

A range of possible studies is available in the "Nature of the Ancient Past" section of this syllabus. Studies must not overlap or substantially duplicate any topic covered in Year 12 Ancient History or History Extension courses. The investigation can be incorporated into any aspect of the Year 11 course and does not need to be completed as a single project.

The examination must not overlap with or substantially duplicate any subject attempted in Year 12 Ancient History or History Extension courses. Further details of the study can be found in the Historical Study section of this syllabus.

HISTORICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILLS

INVESTIGATING ANCIENT HISTORY – THE NATURE, METHODS AND ISSUES OF ANCIENT HISTORY (60

CONTENT FOCUS

  • THE INVESTIGATION OF ANCIENT SITES AND SOURCES
  • HISTORICAL AUTHENTICATION AND RELIABILITY
  • PRESERVATION, CONSERVATION AND/OR RECONSTRUCTION OF ANCIENT SITES
  • CULTURAL HERITAGE AND THE ROLE OF MUSEUMS
  • THE TREATMENT AND DISPLAY OF HUMAN REMAINS

Use the context, purpose, origin and audience of sources to identify their significance at the time and their value in historical research (ACHAH007). Analyze and account for the different perspectives of individuals and groups in the past, as evidenced by various sources (ACHAH010). Analyze, interpret and synthesize evidence from different types of sources to make reasoned claims (ACHAH008).

Evaluate the debatability of sources and their reliability and applicability to a particular historical question or inquiry (ACHAH009). Students examine the nature of ancient sites and sources, including the contributions of archeology and science to our understanding of the past. Examples that could be used to illustrate aspects of the content include: The Theban Mapping Project;.

Examples that could be used to illustrate aspects of the content include: Piltdown Man; Shroud of Turin; Students investigate methods and issues related to the conservation, preservation and/or reconstruction of ancient sites. Examples that could be used to illustrate aspects of the content include: Giza; Knossos; The Athenian Agora; Persepolis; Teotihuacan; Terracotta Warriors; a recent example of a site at risk.

Students examine the importance of artefacts in relation to cultural heritage, ownership and the role of museums.

INVESTIGATING ANCIENT HISTORY – CASE STUDIES

A1: ALEXANDRIA

A2: BOUDICCA

A3: DEIR EL-MEDINA

A4: THE CELTS

A5: THE ROMAN GAMES

A6: THERA

A7: TROY

A8: TUTANKHAMUN’S TOMB

B1: ANCIENT AUSTRALIA

B2: ASHOKA

B3: ENTOMBED WARRIORS OF XIAN

B4: NINEVEH

B5: MASADA

B6: TEOTIHUACAN

B7: THE EMERGENCE OF EARLY SOCIETIES

THE NATURE OF THE ANCIENT PAST (40 INDICATIVE HOURS)

An appropriate historical period should be identified that allows for the examination of features of continuity and change. The study(s) chosen must not overlap with or substantially duplicate any subject attempted for Year 12 Ancient History or History Extension courses. The following must be integrated with the selected study(s) for 'The Nature of the Ancient Past'.

Evaluate the contestability of sources and their reliability and usefulness for a particular historical research question or inquiry (ACHAH009). Framework of questions to guide historical research and develop a coherent research plan (ACHAH004) Develop, test and modify interpretations in the historical research process (ACHAH003). Develop texts, especially narratives and historical arguments, which are substantiated with relevant evidence from sources (ACHAH013).

WOMEN

SLAVERY

ART AND ARCHITECTURE

WEAPONS AND WARFARE

DEATH AND FUNERARY CUSTOMS

POWER AND IMAGE

HISTORICAL INVESTIGATION (20 INDICATIVE HOURS)

History Extension will continue to develop investigative, research and presentation skills for those students who choose to take the course. Communicate historical understanding in forms appropriate for purpose and audience by selecting and applying historical knowledge, concepts and terms (ACHAH014).

ANCIENT HISTORY YEAR 12 COURSE CONTENT

CORE: CITIES OF VESUVIUS – POMPEII AND HERCULANEUM (30 INDICATIVE HOURS)

The following should be integrated with the study of 'Cities of Vesuvius - Pompeii and Herculaneum'.

ANCIENT SOCIETIES (30 INDICATIVE HOURS)

OPTION A: NEW KINGDOM EGYPT SOCIETY TO THE DEATH OF AMENHOTEP III

OPTION B: NEW KINGDOM EGYPT SOCIETY DURING THE RAMESSIDE PERIOD

OPTION C: SOCIETY IN ISRAEL FROM SOLOMON TO THE FALL OF SAMARIA

OPTION D: PERSIAN SOCIETY AT THE TIME OF DARIUS AND XERXES

OPTION E: BRONZE AGE – MINOAN CRETE

OPTION F: SPARTAN SOCIETY TO THE BATTLE OF LEUCTRA 371 BC

OPTION G: ATHENIAN SOCIETY IN THE TIME OF PERICLES

PERSONALITIES IN THEIR TIMES (30 INDICATIVE HOURS)

OPTION A: EGYPT – HATSHEPSUT

OPTION B: EGYPT – AKHENATEN

OPTION C: THE NEAR EAST – SENNACHERIB

OPTION D: THE NEAR EAST – XERXES

OPTION E: GREECE – PERICLES

OPTION F: GREECE – ALEXANDER THE GREAT

OPTION G: JULIUS CAESAR

OPTION H: ROME – AGRIPPINA THE YOUNGER

HISTORICAL PERIODS (30 INDICATIVE HOURS)

OPTION A: NEW KINGDOM EGYPT TO THE DEATH OF THUTMOSE IV

OPTION B: NEW KINGDOM EGYPT – AMENHOTEP III TO THE DEATH OF RAMESSES II

Through an examination of the archaeological and written records for the Old Levant during the First Temple period c. 970–586 BCE, with a focus on Israel and Judah, students explore the nature of power and authority, key developments that shaped and are relevant to the historical period. Judah's prosperity in the 8th to 6th centuries BC as a vassal state of Assyria - relations with the Babylonian Empire.

OPTION D: PERSIA – CYRUS II TO THE DEATH OF DARIUS III

OPTION E: THE GREEK WORLD 500–440 BC

OPTION F: 4TH–CENTURY GREECE TO THE DEATH OF PHILIP II

THE JULIO-CLAUDIANS AD 14–69

GLOSSARY

It involves the critical analysis and evaluation of historical methods and the way history has been written over time. Includes objects, places, cultural knowledge, cultural expressions and art that have been transmitted or continue to be transmitted through generations as belonging to a particular indigenous group or indigenous people as a whole or their territory. Indigenous peoples This term is used when it refers collectively to the first peoples of a country in international societies.

The term Indigenous Australians is used when talking about both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples within Australia. The discipline of History recognizes that there is often more than one view of what happened in the past. Native Title 'Native Title' is the name given by the Supreme Court to native property rights recognized by the court in the Mabo judgment (3 June 1992).

The Mabo judgment overturned the concept of terra nullius – that Australia's land had belonged to no one when the British arrived in 1788. The judgment found that an indigenous title to land existed in 1788 and can continue to exist, provided it has not been extinguished by subsequent government actions and provided that indigenous groups continue to observe their traditional laws and customs. The High Court's Wik judgment (December 1996) settled an issue not resolved by the Mabo judgment when it held that native title could coexist with other rights in land held under a pastoral lease.

References

Related documents

List of tables Table 1: Threatened and Priority Flora and Ecological Communities potentially occurring in the vicinity of the site 13 Table 2: Vegetation types 15 Table 3: