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Gosford City Centre

Development Control Plan

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Gosford City Centre Development Control Plan

October 2018 © Crown Copyright 2018 NSW Government DISCLAIMER

While every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that this document is correct at the time of printing, the State of NSW, its agents and employees, disclaim any and all liability to any person in respect of anything or the consequences of anything done or omitted to be done in reliance or upon the whole or any part of this document.

Copyright Notice

In keeping with the NSW Government’s commitment to encourage the availability of information, you are welcome to reproduce the material that appears in the Gosford City Centre DCP for personal in-house or non-commercial use without formal permission or charge. All other rights are reserved. If you wish to reproduce, alter, store or transmit material appearing in the Gosford City Centre DCP for any other purpose, request for formal permission should be directed to:

Gosford City Centre DCP PO Box 1148

Gosford NSW 2250

Cover Image: Artist impression of the revitalised Civic Heart (CHROFI) Image opposite: Gosford Hospital Redevelopment (Photo by Salty Dingo)

Strategic priorities

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1 Introduction 6

1.1 Name of Development Control Plan 7 1.2 Relevant Planning Authority 7 1.3 Assessment and Determination Authority 7 1.4 Adoption and commencement 8 1.5 Purpose of the DCP 8 1.6 Aims and objectives 8 1.7 Relationship to other planning

instruments 9 1.8 Adoption of development controls 9 1.9 Application of the DCP 9 1.10 Public notification of development

applications 10 1.11 Variations to DCP controls 13

2 Strategic priorities 14

2.1 The approach 16

3 Places and character 18

3.1 Character areas 19

3.2 City North 20

3.3 Civic Heart 21

3.4 City South 22

3.5 Other areas 23

4 Public spaces 24

4.1 Pedestrian network 25 4.2 Public open space 27 4.3 Solar access to key public spaces 28

4.4 Views and vistas 30

4.5 Footpath crossings and pedestrian overpasses and underpasses 32

5 Built form 34

5.1 Site sizes and design excellence 36 5.2 Built form provisions 36

6 Key Sites 54

6.1 Introduction 55

6.2 Key Site 1

299-305 Mann Street (former Mitre 10 site) 57 6.3 Key Site 2

8-16 Watt Street

(Gateway Centre) 58

6.4 Key Site 3

171 Mann Street and 12 and 36 William Street (Imperial Shopping Centre) 59 6.5 Key Site 4

136-148 Donnison Street (former Market Town) 60

Image: Artist impression of the revitalised Civic Heart (CHROFI)

Contents

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6.6 Key Site 5

1 Dane Drive (Central Coast Leagues Club) 61 6.7 Key Site 6

26 - 32 Mann Street 62

7 Access and parking 63

7.1 Introduction 64

7.2 Pedestrian Access and Mobility 65 7.3 Vehicular Driveways and Manoeuvring

areas 65

7.4 On-Site Parking 66

7.5 Site Facilities and Services 74

8 Environmental

management 76

8.1 Introduction 77

8.2 Energy Efficiency and Conservation 78 8.3 Water Conservation 78

8.4 Reflectivity 79

8.5 Wind Mitigation 79

8.6 Waste and Recycling 80 8.7 Noise and Vibration 82

9 Residential Development Controls 84

9.1 Housing Choice and Mix 86

9.2 Storage 87

9.3 Multi-Dwelling Housing 87

10 Controls for Special Areas 89

10.1 Heritage Items 90

10.2 Signs on Heritage Items and Heritage Plaques 91 10.3 Special Area - John Whiteway Drive

Precinct 93

Appendix A 97

Glossary of key terms and acronyms

Appendix B 100

Appendix C 103

Notification table

Schedule of amendments

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01 Introduction

Introduction

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1.1 Name of Development Control Plan

This plan is known as the Gosford City Centre Development Control Plan 2018 and supports the objectives identified by the State Environmental Planning Policy (Gosford City Centre) 2018.

1.2 Relevant Planning Authority

The relevant planning authority is the Planning Secretary of the NSW Department of Planning and Environment.

Capital

Investment Value

Greater than

$75 million

Greater than, or equal to, $10 million - $75 million

Less than $10 million

Assessment

Department of Planning and Environment

Department of Planning and Environment

Central Coast Council Pathway

State Significant Development under the State Environmental Planning Policy (State and Regional Development) 2011

Part 4 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979

Part 4 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979

Determination

Minister (or delegate) OR Independent Planning Commission, if the council or more than 25 submitters object, or if the applicant discloses a political donation

Minister (or delegate) OR Independent Planning Commission, if the capital investment value is more than

$40 million and the Council objects

Central Coast Council, except where the JRPP is the determination authority

1.3 Assessment and Determination Authority

In Gosford City Centre, the assessment and determination framework is specified within State Environmental Planning Policy (Gosford City Centre) 2018 (Clause 1.6) and State Environmental Planning Policy (State and Regional Development) 2011 (Schedule 2). A summary of this framework is provided below:

Image: Apartments in the City South (photo by Salty Dingo)

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1.4 Adoption and commencement

This DCP plan will commence on 19 October 2018, being the date that a public notice of its approval by the Secretary was placed in a local newspaper.

1.5 Purpose of the DCP

The purpose of this Development Control Plan (the DCP) is to provide development controls for quality development and sound environmental outcomes within the Gosford City Centre.

This DCP provides more detailed provisions to expand upon the controls within GCC SEPP for development in the Gosford City Centre that will contribute to the growth and character of Gosford and protect and enhance the public domain.

Under section 4.15 (previously s79C) of the

Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, the assessment and determining authority is required to take into consideration the relevant provisions of this DCP in determining any application for development (except for State Significant Development). For State Significant Development, this DCP contains matters of relevance to applicants in the preparation of development proposals.

1.6 Aims and objectives

The aims and objectives of this DCP are:

To identify expectations and requirements for development within Gosford City Centre and build upon the GCC SEPP by providing detailed objectives and controls for development;

To ensure that all development aligns with the vision, recommendations and place character in the Urban Design Framework prepared by the NSW Government Architect;

To identify approaches and techniques which promote design excellence resulting in quality urban design and architectural outcomes in Gosford City Centre; and

To promote best practice and quality environmental outcomes.

Image: St Hilliers building site in the City South (photo by Salty Dingo)

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1.7 Relationship to other planning instruments

The DCP has been prepared in accordance with the provisions of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (EP&A Act 1979) and the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000 (the EP&A Reg 2000).

The DCP complements the provisions of State

Environmental Planning Policy (Gosford City Centre) 2018 (GCC SEPP). The provisions of the GCC SEPP prevail over the DCP.

Other State Environmental Planning Policies may apply to the land to which this DCP applies.

This DCP supersedes all previous development control plans applying to the Gosford City Centre.

Gosford Local Environmental Plan 2014 and Gosford Development Control Plan 2013 no longer apply to the City Centre. Notwithstanding, this DCP may (in accordance with Section 3.43 (3) of the EP&A Act 1979 adopt provisions of another DCP by reference.

1.8 Adoption of

development controls

This DCP adopts the NSW Government Architect’s Urban Design Framework (adopted October 2018) for the purposes of a strategic framework to guide development proposals within Gosford City Centre.

Development applications must also show how they address this strategic framework.

In accordance with Section 3.43 (3) of the EP&A Act 1979, this Plan adopts by reference the following provisions of the Gosford Development Control Plan 2013 (as amended):

– Part 3 Specific controls and development types – Part 4.4 Gosford Waterfront

– Part 6 Environmental controls – Part 7 General controls

In addition, the Oculus Streetscape Masterplan (prepared by former Gosford City Council dated 2011) has been adopted for the purpose of streetscape and public domain guidance in Gosford City Centre.

Where the above provisions are superseded by a consolidated Central Coast Development Control Plan (DCP) or revised Streetscape Masterplan, the references are taken to refer to the new relevant sections of Council’s Central Coast DCP or revised Streetscape Masterplan.

Where the above provisions conflict with those in this DCP, the provisions of this DCP shall prevail.

1.9 Application of the DCP

This DCP applies to all land to which the GCC SEPP applies.

The Plan applies to all categories of development as defined within the EP&A Act 1979 addressed within the Chapters of this DCP (or adopted by this Plan).

Where a development application is lodged which relates to land to which this plan applies, the determining authority shall take the provisions of this plan into consideration in determining that application.

Development applications must demonstrate conformity with the objectives of this Plan.

Each application will be considered on the individual circumstances and merits of the case in terms of achievement of the aims and objectives of the DCP and the objectives and sections of any relevant chapters of the DCP.

Compliance with the provisions of this plan does not necessarily imply that the determining authority will consent to any application. Other matters must also be taken into consideration, including those matters listed under Section 4.15 of the EP&A Act 1979 (as amended).

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1.10 Public notification of development applications

The advertising and notification provisions apply to all development and related applications lodged under Part 4 of the EP&A Act 1979, in the Gosford City Centre, with the exception of development applications in the following categories:

– Designated Development – State Significant Development

For these categories of development, applications will be notified in accordance with the relevant provisions of the EP&A Reg 2000.

For State Significant Development under the State Environmental Planning Policy (State and Regional Development) 2011, for which the Minister of Planning is the determining authority, applications will be advertised in a local newspaper and notified on the Department of Planning and Environment’s website.

State Significant Development applications must be publicly notified for a minimum of 28 days.

Adjoining land-owners to be notified Where required by this plan, written notice of a development application will be sent to adjoining landowners of land subject of the application (except where land is held in common ownership with the subject land). This includes persons who own land that share a common property boundary with the site and land directly on the opposite side of a creek, road, pathway or similar thoroughfare.

Central Coast Council will be notified of all

development applications lodged with the Department of Planning and Environment.

Where adjoining or neighbouring land is owned under Strata Title or Community Title, notification shall be sent to the Manager or Secretary of the Owners Corporation or Association. In these cases, it is the responsibility of the Manager or Secretary of the Owners Corporation or Association to make residents aware of the development proposal.

The determining authority will not separately notify the tenants of adjoining or neighbouring land of applications received. However, tenants or any member of the public may make a submission to a development proposal.

Where adjoining or neighbouring land is owned by more than one person, a notice to one owner will satisfy the requirements of this Chapter.

Applications requiring notification Notification or advertising will be required for

development applications for a development of a type listed in the Notification Table (Appendix B).

For ‘any other development’, being instances where a proposed land use is not mentioned in the Notification Table and/or the assessing authority is of the opinion that the proposal will have little or no environmental impact, public notification will not be required.

Image: Brisbane Water (photo by Tim Ciantar)

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Public interest notification

Where the assessing authority considers that any development application or proposal may impact the amenity of an area or be of significant community interest, the determining authority may notify surrounding land owners, relevant interest groups, organisations or agencies.

Form of notice

The written notice to be forwarded by the assessing authority under this Chapter shall contain the following information:

– the applicant’s name;

– the application number;

– the description of the land and address to which the application relates including street address and any known and commonly used property name;

– a description of the proposal;

– the officer dealing with the application or other appropriate contact;

– the time within which written submissions will be considered;

– an invitation to inspect plans and documents and details of when and where such plans may be inspected.

Development applications that are required to be notified under this Plan shall be published on Council’s or the NSW Department of Planning and Environment’s website, depending on the relevant assessing authority.

Exhibition of applications

Plans, models and any written material submitted with a development application that has been notified will be available for inspection during office hours by any person free of charge for the period identified and from the date of notice.

A copy of plans (other than floor plans) will be made available on request subject to payment of the fee established by the determining authority for copying of development application plans and the copyright of the plans being protected.

Where a notified development application is accompanied by a written request to justify the contravention of a development standard under cl. 4.6 of the GCC SEPP, the written request shall be exhibited with the application and copies made available.

Form and timing of submissions

The period of notice for any development application will be as listed in the Notification Table (Appendix B) or as otherwise specified under the EP&A Act 1979 and EP&A Reg 2000.

Submissions on development applications must be made in writing and lodged with the relevant determining authority within the period specified in the notice (the exhibition period).

Any person may make a written submission within the specified time period. Submissions must clearly state the grounds on which the submission is being made i.e.

the reasons for support or objection to the proposal.

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Image: Baker Street Laneway (photo by Salty Dingo)

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Acknowledgement of receipt of submissions All submissions received within the specified time period will be acknowledged by the determining authority. In the case of any petition received, only the person identified as the main proponent or the first addressee will be acknowledged.

Consideration of submissions

The determining authority will consider all submissions received within the specified period in its assessment.

Following determination of a development application, all persons who made a submission will be notified of the decision.

Anonymous submissions will be considered.

Submissions lodged after the exhibition period, but before a Development Application is determined, will also be considered.

Notification of proposals amended prior to determination

An applicant may amend a development application prior to the determination of the application. If the original development application was notified or advertised, prior to determination of the development application, the development application must be re-advertised and/or re-notified to persons previously notified, or anyone who made a submission to the original development application.

The notification period for an amended development application is the same as the original notification.

Notwithstanding the above, if the amendments are minor or will result in no additional impacts, the amendments will not require re-advertisement or re-notification.

Request for review of a determination Where an applicant requests the determining

authority to review its determination of a development application (Division 8 of the EP&A Act 1979), all persons who were notified of the original application will be re-notified.

Public notification of modification applications Public notification of applications lodged under s.4.55 of the EP&A Act 1979, will generally not be required unless the determining authority is of the opinion it may impact on an adjoining property submissions were received to the original application.

Where the determining authority considers that notification is necessary, adjoining land owners will be notified.

1.11 Variations to DCP controls

Variation of any control in this Plan may be acceptable where an application demonstrates its conformity with the objectives that are specified by this Plan, or where design excellence has been satisfactorily demonstrated.

Any variation to the controls must be supported by a written statement demonstrating how the objectives of each relevant chapter of the DCP are fully satisfied.

Where, in the opinion of the assessment and determining authority, an application satisfies the objectives set out in this plan or a design review panel reviews and supports a development, the authority may grant consent to the application notwithstanding that one or more of the controls are not complied with.

Schedule of amendments

From time to time, the DCP will be amended. The table outlining the Schedule of Amendments in Appendix C records the amendments that have taken place and their status at the time of printing.

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02 Strategic priorities

This Chapter outlines the high-level vision for

Gosford City Centre in the NSW State Government’s and the Central Coast Council’s relevant strategic planning documents and explains how the approach of this DCP will help support that vision.

Strategic priorities

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Image: View of Brisbane Water from Rumbalara Reserve (photo by Jane Freeman, Architectus)

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A city that is connected to nature and its

landscape

Promote investment and support

balanced growth Quality public

space and streets for

people

A city where community can meet and enjoy

public life

The vision for Gosford

NSW Government’s Central Coast Regional Plan 2036

Framework for achieving this vision

Government Architect NSW’s Urban Design Framework

Gosford as the regional city of a healthy, prosperous and

connected Central Coast.

1 2 3 4

For more detailed information on the Gosford Urban Design Framework or the Central Coast Regional Plan 2036, please visit www.planning.nsw.gov.au

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Connecting to a beautiful natural setting to make a thriving city.

The DCP provides new controls for protecting views from the public domain to the ridgeline, especially for large sites. New street wall height controls will protect views to the sky in streets. Public domain plans and setback controls will create more connections to the waterfront and parks and allow for more street tree planting.

2.1 The approach

This DCP has been developed through detailed testing and analysis and an understanding of the vision, the recommendations and the place areas identified within the NSW Government Architect’s Urban Design Framework. The approach to preparing this DCP, and for how it will be implemented can be summarised as follows:

Protect and enhance the quality of three important public spaces – Kibble Park, Leagues Club Field and Mann Street.

The success of these spaces is fundamental to the city’s success. The controls have been designed to celebrate these spaces and development in close proximity must be designed to provide active spaces, minimise overshadowing and protect views from the parks to Rumbalara Reserve, Presidents Hill and out to Brisbane Water.

Parks in walking distance of every home.

Green spaces are very important in dense cities – they provide relief, promote active and healthy behaviour, foster community and become a replacement backyard for people living in apartments. To achieve this goal the DCP identifies a need to investigate the locations for new parks (including a new park to serve the northern parts of the City), and create better streets for walking to every park.

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Tailored controls for small, medium and large sites.

The GCC SEPP seeks to maintain a sliding scale approach for height and floor space ratio (FSR) for sites in Gosford City Centre. The policy seeks to ensure that small, medium and large lots can be renewed. Put simply, the policy has prepared tailored controls for small, medium and large sites, categorised by certain site criteria. For example, medium and large lots that seek to vary height or floor space controls will be required to go through an enhanced design excellence process.

A Key Sites approach respecting public domain.

The DCP focuses on the sites that make a big impact.

Six key sites have been identified due to their size, their potential to provide new public domain or their relationship with existing important places. The DCP requires that key large sites go through a master planning process. This DCP provides principles for each site to help guide that process.

A place-based DCP that supports design excellence and amenity.

The DCP provides desired future character statements that will inform the design excellence process and determination of applications. The GCC SEPP requires that all development within Gosford City Centre exhibits design excellence. A merit approach will provide the framework for finding the best outcomes through good design.

Designing controls for great building performance.

Ensuring that new residential development achieves the standards set out in the Apartment Design Guide is an important part in ensuring Gosford’s long-term competitiveness. The built form testing to inform the SEPP and the DCP assume critical measures like solar access and cross ventilation, recycling and reuse of materials and waste, and use of sustainable materials are achieved.

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03 Places and character

Image: Artist impression of the revitalised City North (CHROFI)

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Places and

character

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City North

City South

Enterprise Corridor

Civic Heart

Residential

3.1 Character areas

Mixed Use

Mixed Use

Figure 1. Character Areas

Residential

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City North includes a range of important regional services, including education and health facilities, as well as significant open space and recreational assets.

The hospital is a major investment in the future of Gosford. Connecting the hospital back into the city, with new connections over the rail corridor, is critical to promote the co-location of uses, enhance activation and revitalise the area.

Future development should leverage off the existing health and education assets, delivering a diverse range of health and employment uses that will strengthen the role of Gosford as a regional city.

Future development should deliver a range of housing types including affordable housing, and support a diverse range of households, including families, students and workers, within walking distance of the city centre.

Future development should be supported by new pedestrian connections, improved walkability and an attractive public domain.

3.2 City North

1 Promote health and education uses to support the creation of an innovation precinct.

2 Connect the hospital to the city with improved active transport connections.

3 Improve permeability and provide new pedestrian links across the rail corridor.

4 Increase public open space, to provide green relief, connect with the surrounding bushland, and provide a sense of identity for the north.

5 Provide a range of housing types to support a diverse and varied population, including key workers, students, young professionals and aged care.

Objectives Character

Image: Artist impression of the revitalised City North (CHROFI)

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Geographically in the centre of the city, the Civic Heart focuses around Kibble Park. Kibble Park is a central meeting place that brings the character of the bushland into the city.

Mann Street is the primary spine that connects to the City North and City South precincts. Characterised by a fine grain streetscape, future development should maintain the fine grain character along Mann Street.

Many important regional functions are also located in this precinct, including the proposed new regional library, local courts and government services. The focus of this area is to create a centrally located, attractive and connected open space and town square.

Future development should allow for flexible uses including community events and markets, protect key views to Presidents Hill and Rumbalara Reserve, and maintain sunlight to public spaces. Active uses will be focused along Mann Street, and surround Kibble Park providing a diversity of uses that attract people at all times of the day.

3.3 Civic Heart

1 Protect view corridors to Presidents Hill and Rumbalara Reserve.

2 Ensure excellent solar access and amenity to Kibble Park.

3 Protect and promote the fine grain retail of Mann Street to facilitate an active and functional city spine.

4 Ensure active and defined street frontages and frontages to all park edges.

5 Promote a diversity of built form and high quality mixed use developments.

6 Promote new commercial development in the core for job growth and to protect Gosford’s role as a regional city and associated regional functions.

Image: Artist impression of the revitalised Civic Heart (CHROFI)

Objectives Character

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City South is a key arrival point for visitors to the Central Coast, and with important regional attractors, including the Stadium, Olympic Swimming Pool and the Leagues Club, City South is a major draw for people from the wider region.

There is a strong visual connection to Presidents Hill and Rumbalara Reserve, which creates a unique identity, framed by the surrounding landscape and Brisbane Water. The connection to its landscape setting forms an important part of City South’s local character and views to the water and the hills should be prioritised.

The City South has a strong cultural and environmental heritage link relating to buildings, structures,

landscapes and tree plantings.

There is a growing local population of workers and residents in this part of the city. There is the opportunity to enliven City South at more times of the day, for locals, regional visitors and tourists. Building on the existing regional attractors to create a diversity of uses, will attract people at all times of the day, and week.

Improved connections from City South will better connect Gosford’s city centre to the water’s edge. City South will become more than just an arrival destination, it will be a place to spend time.

3.4 City South

Maintain strong visual connections and views to Presidents Hill and Rumbalara Reserve.

2 Continue the established city grid from the Civic Heart and Mann Street through City South.

3 Provide improved connections to the waterfront.

4 Promote a diversity of uses and attractors to accommodate a range of uses at all times of the day and week.

Maintain views from the stadium and Leagues Club Field to the water.

Conserve significant local heritage buildings and landscapes which contribute to the character of the City South.

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Image: Aerial view of Leagues Club Field (CHROFI)

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Objectives Character

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The city fringe areas allow a range of uses including residential, employment, light industrial and retail to support the city centre.

The mixed use areas in the north provide opportunities for significant urban renewal through new retail and residential developments. The mixed use zone extends to the south along the edge of the waterfront to facilitate tourism and denser residential development.

The enterprise corridor allows a mix of employment generating uses to complement those in the commercial core. Located to the west of Presidents Hill, built form is to remain relatively low to maintain the prominence of Presidents Hill and views to Brisbane Water.

The residential areas within the city fringe will provide for a diverse range of housing to accommodate an additional 10,000 residents over the next 25 years. New development will consist of medium to high density residential apartments to encourage increased housing within walking distance of the city centre.

3.5 Other areas

1 Encourage a mix of uses including employment, residential, recreation and retail that support the commercial core.

2 Provide a diversity of housing, including higher density residential development in the city fringe to support the viability of the city centre and encourage 24-hour use of the city’s amenities.

3 Facilitate tourism and increased residential development along the waterfront.

4 Provide a mix of lower scale employment uses in the enterprise corridor zone to encourage employment generating opportunities that complement the commercial core.

Built form in the city fringe areas is to maintain the prominence of Presidents Hill and views to Brisbane Water.

Image: View over Gosford City Centre (Photo by Don Grogan)

5

Objectives Character

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04 Public spaces

The public domain and pedestrian environment provides people with their primary experience of, and interface with, the city. This environment needs to be active, safe, functional and accessible to all.

This Chapter provides guidance on the public domain, including the pedestrian network, new open spaces and the requirements for solar access and views to protect the amenity of existing and new public spaces.

Public spaces

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4.1 Pedestrian network

Gosford City Centre’s streets, lanes, arcades, through site links and public open spaces should form an integrated pedestrian network providing choice of routes and accessibility for all people.

Successful pedestrian networks encourage a healthy lifestyle and enable an active pedestrian life in the City Centre.

Objectives

A Provide high pedestrian comfort for pedestrian amenity and safety.

B Retain and enhance existing through site links.

Retain and develop lanes as useful and interesting pedestrian connections as well as for service access.

Controls

1. Existing publicly and privately owned links are to be retained.

2. Where possible, existing dead end streets and lanes are to be extended through to the next street as redevelopment occurs to provide pedestrian links.

3. Open air links for pedestrians are to be provided as shown in Figure 2. These shall:

a. be open to the air and publicly accessible.

b. have a minimum width of 6m clear of all obstructions unless otherwise noted.

c. connect with existing and proposed through block lanes, shared zones, arcades and pedestrian ways and opposite other through site links.

d. have active frontages or a street address.

e. be clear and direct through-ways for pedestrians.

f. have signage at street entries indicating public accessibility and the street to which the through site link connects.

4. Arcades are to be provided as shown in Figure 2.

These shall:

a. have a minimum width as shown in Figure 2, clear of all obstructions (including columns, stairs, escalators)

b. have a minimum clear floor to ceiling height of 6m for 8m wide links and 3m for 4m links (and 6m is desirable), however they can also be provided as open air links if desired c. provide direct visibility from street to street d. connect to existing footpaths and pedestrian

crossings where possible

e. have active frontages for their length

f. be clear and direct throughways for pedestrians

C

Image: Pedestrian crossing at Gosford Station (photo by Salty Dingo)

g. provide public access at all business trading times

h. where practical, have access to natural light for at least 30% of their length

i. where air conditioned, have clear glazed entry doors comprising at least 50% of the entrance j. have signage at street entries indicating public

accessibility and the street to which the through site link connects

5. Investigate a potential 5m setback for pedestrian access and street tree planting along the western side of Mann Street between Burns Place and Etna Street (this could be linked to increased height on medium and larger sites).

6. Reference should be made to relevant guidelines in Austroads Guides, Australian Standards, NSW Government Planning Guidelines for Walking and Cycling and NSW Roads and Maritime Services technical directions.

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1

2

3

4 5

6 T

Mann Street

Henry P arry Drive

Pacific Highway Central Coast Highway

Henry Parry Drive

Figure 2. On-site public domain improvements Train station

Railway T

Legend

Desirable links

Enclosed / arcade (4m)

Open air (6m) Open air (8m)

Investigate potential for 5m setback to accommodate improved pedestrian connection and street tree planting Gosford City Centre boundary

1:12,500 0 100 200 300 g 500M

Enclosed / arcade (8m) Investigate potential for new open space (Area A)

A

Key sites - see Section 6

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Objectives

A Provide accessible and safe high quality open spaces.

B Retain and enhance existing public open spaces, especially Kibble Park, the Leagues Club Field and the waterfront.

C Provide new public open space in renewal areas, especially north of the train station and west of the rail line.

New open spaces are required in the city to support a growing population and to ensure residents are in walking distance of quality open space. The preferred mechanism for the delivery of these parks is for a park to be delivered as part of a large master planned site, where open space can be delivered in exchange for additional floor space and/or building height. For this to occur, the determining authority must be satisfied with the design and location of the park.

Controls

1. Public open space is to be characterised by excellence of design, high quality materials and a high standard of finish appropriate to a regional City Centre.

2. As identified in Figure 2, development proposals in the City North area, adjacent to the Railway line, must investigate the potential for a 5m setback to accommodate improved pedestrian connection and street tree planting.

3. Within Area A (as identified in Figure 2), a new open space greater than 2000sqm that allows for informal active recreation is desired.

4. This new public open space should:

a. connect with existing and proposed links in the pedestrian network.

b. consist of primarily soft landscaping and provide deep soil zones.

c. be publicly accessible and provide passive recreation for pedestrians.

4.2 Public open space

Public open spaces provide for a wide variety of opportunities for recreational, social and cultural activities, making a city with accessible parks and open spaces attractive, safe and liveable to its residents, workers and visitors.

Image: Rotary Park (photo by Salty Dingo)

D

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GOSFORD PLACE REPORT 1 Kibble Park: The Civic Heart

View 3: Kibble Park from Henry Parry Drive

Objective

A To allow sufficient sunlight access to new and existing key public spaces, such as Kibble Park, William Street Plaza and Leagues Club Field, particularly well used parts of these spaces, at all times of the year.

Controls

1. For Key Open Space 1 (Kibble Park), buildings must be designed to ensure at least 60% of the park receives 4 hours of direct sunlight between 9am and 3pm on the winter solstice (21 June). Without limiting the above, it is preferred that Kibble Park receives 70% of direct sunlight for 4 hours during that time if it can be achieved through good design. Note – This performance standard is contiguous hours, and is cumulative between developments.

2. For William Street Plaza (adjacent to and west of Kibble Park), buildings should be designed (where possible) to limit overshadowing of this key public space which connects pedestrians from Mann Street to Kibble Park.

4.3 Solar access to key public spaces

Good solar access is a key contributor to the amenity of public spaces, particularly during winter. The GCC SEPP provides percentage based solar access controls to better protect sun access to key public open spaces. The controls provide a quantifiable development control which acts to minimise cumulative impacts of neighbouring development on these spaces.

The controls below refer to the winter solstice and provide 21 June as the test case for the performance standard. These performance standards are designed to protect sun access not only at this date but also more generously at other times throughout the year.

Image: Artist impression of the revitalised Civic Heart (CHROFI)

3. For Key Open Space 2 (Leagues Club Field), buildings must be designed to ensure at least 70% of the field receives 4 hours of direct sunlight between 9am and 3pm on the winter solstice (21 June). Note – This performance standard is contiguous hours, and is cumulative between developments.

4. Solar access exceeding the minimum provisions should be provided if it can be achieved through good design.

5. For other existing public open spaces, such as Burns Park, Memorial Park and Gosford Rotary Park (Poppy Park), including Gosford City Park, buildings must be designed to ensure that at least 50% of the open space receives a minimum of 4 hours of sunlight between 9am and 3pm on 21 June.

6. For any new public spaces, buildings are to be designed to ensure that at least 50% (minimum) or 70% (preferred) of the open space provided receives a minimum of 4 hours of sunlight between 9am and 3pm on the winter solstice (21 June).

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Figure 3. Key open spaces solar access

at least

70%

1

2

2

1:12,500 0 100 200 300 400 500M

of the the park receives direct sunlight for 4 hours between 9am and 3pm on the winter solstice (21 June) at least

60%

1

Train station Railway T

City Centre boundary Legend

Key open spaces

Kibble Park

Leagues Club Field

of the field receives direct sunlight for 4 hours between 9am and 3pm on the winter solstice (21 June)

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Objectives

A Enhance Gosford’s unique identity and sense of place that is created by the current significant views and vistas, particularly those identified in Figure 4.

Protect Gosford’s character of visual openness with the surrounding landscape.

C Maintain and enhance significant view corridors from public spaces and streets to Brisbane Water and the identified view corridors which afford views of the ridgelines of Rumbalara Reserve and Presidents Hill.

D Open up new significant views, where possible.

Controls

1. The floorplates of buildings above street frontage heights should be designed in accordance with the slender tower provisions in Chapter 5 of this DCP.

2. Key views (identified in Figure 4) are those existing views of the ridgelines of Presidents Hill, Rumbalara Reserve and views of Brisbane Water from important locations, including the centre of Kibble Park, Leagues Club Field and Brian McGowan Bridge.

4.4 Views and vistas

The character of Gosford is strongly defined by significant views, particularly to Brisbane Water and the ridgelines of Rumbalara Reserve and Presidents Hill. Significant views should be maintained, especially from public spaces. Vistas are views along streets that are framed by street wall buildings.

Image: Aerial photo of Gosford (photo by Bravo Dron)

3. Other key viewscritical to the heritage

significance of heritage items and places should be protected (for example views from the Memorial Park over to Brisbane Water and the waterfront, and views from the Cenotaph to the rising sun in the east).

4. Street vistas (identified in Figure 4) are those existing long distance street vistas that allow vision of the surrounding bushland and/or water views. To protect street vistas, development adjoining street vistas should comply with street wall and tower setback controls (identified in Chapter 5 Built form) to maximise preservation of long distance street vistas.

Compliance with this control must be demonstrated in any development application for sites adjoining identified street vistas through view analysis.

Specifically, the analysis should demonstrate that the proposed built form has been designed to minimise its impact on these views.

B

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RL 90

RL 150

T

Mann Street

Henry P arry Drive

Pacific Highway Central Coast Highway

Henry Parry Drive

Figure 4. Topography, key views and vistas 1:12,500 0 100 200 300 400 500M

Train station Railway

Height and topography Street vistas

Key views

T

Gosford City Centre boundary Legend

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4.5 Footpath crossings and pedestrian overpasses and underpasses

4.5.1 Vehicle Footpath Crossings

Vehicle crossings over footpaths can disrupt pedestrian movement and threaten safety. The design of vehicle access to buildings also influences the quality of the public domain.

Overly wide and high vehicle access points detract from the streetscape and the active use of street frontages.

The design and location of vehicle access to

developments should minimise both conflicts between pedestrians and vehicles on footpaths, particularly along pedestrian priority places, and visual intrusion and disruption of streetscape continuity.

Design of driveways and vehicle access is to be in accordance with the provisions of Section 7.3.

Objectives

A To make vehicle access to buildings more compatible with pedestrian movements.

B Reduce the impact of vehicular access on the public domain.

Controls

Location of Vehicle Access

1. One vehicle access point only (including the access for service vehicles and parking for non-residential uses within mixed use developments) will be generally permitted.

2. Where practicable, vehicle access is to be from lanes and minor streets rather than primary street fronts or streets with major pedestrian activity.

3. Where practicable, adjoining buildings are to share or amalgamate vehicle access points. Internal on-site signal equipment is to be used to allow shared access. Where appropriate, new buildings should provide vehicle access points so that they are capable of shared access at a later date.

4. Vehicle access may not be required or may be denied to some heritage buildings.

Design of vehicle access

5. Wherever practicable, vehicle access is to be a single lane crossing with a maximum width of 2.7 metres over the footpath, and perpendicular to the kerb alignment. In exceptional circumstances, a double lane crossing with a maximum width of 5.4 metres may be permitted for safety reasons (refer to Figure 5).

6. Vehicle access ramps parallel to the street frontage will not be permitted.

7. Ensure vehicle entry points are integrated into building design.

8. Doors to vehicle access points are to be roller shutters or tilting doors fitted behind the building facade.

9. Vehicle entries are to have high quality finishes to walls and ceilings as well as high standard detailing.

No service ducts or pipes are to be visible from the street.

Porte Cocheres

10. Porte cocheres are not favoured and may only be permitted for hotels subject to urban design, streetscape, heritage and pedestrian amenity considerations.

11. Where practicable, porte cocheres are to be internal to the building with one combined vehicle entry and exit point, or one entry and one exit point on two different frontages of the development.

footpath street

2.7 m single crossing (nominal)

5.4 m double crossing (nominal)

roller door opening:

4.0 m single (nominal) 6.0 m double (nominal)

Figure 5. Design of Vehicle Access Source: Central Coast Council

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Controls

1. New overpasses over streets are discouraged, including on land adjoining or fronting Mann Street (or over Mann Street), bounded by Etna Street and Vaughan Avenue. In exceptional circumstances, new overpasses over service lanes may be considered subject to assessment of impacts on safety and crime prevention, streetscape amenity, activation of the public domain and the benefits of connectivity.

2. Underpasses may be considered where they:

a. would substantially improve pedestrian safety and accessibility;

b. incorporate active uses, particularly at entry and exit points;

c. have a minimum width of 4.5 metres clear of all fixed obstructions and a minimum ceiling height of 4 metres; and

d. would directly connect major transport nodes such as the railway station to the City, or substantially improve pedestrian safety and access.

12. In exceptional circumstances for buildings with one street frontage only, an indented porte cochere with separate entry and exit points across the footpath may be permitted, as long as it is constructed entirely at the footpath level and provides an active frontage at its perimeter.

4.5.2 Pedestrian Overpasses and Underpasses Streets represent important components of the public domain and provide the best potential amenity and safety when activated by pedestrians. Streets offer sky exposure, sunlight and air, a sense of orientation and direct access to the main frontages of buildings.

Generally, pedestrians should be encouraged to use the street level to enhance and contribute to street life, to promote activity and interest, and to maximise safety and security of the public domain. Gosford’s climate does not warrant pedestrian isolation from the street, and any conflicts between pedestrians and vehicles are to be resolved at the street level.

Pedestrian overpasses are discouraged on Mann Street as they have a negative impact on the streetscape quality and on views and vistas along streets. New pedestrian underpasses will only be considered where they would directly connect to major transport nodes such as the railway station to the City, or substantially improve pedestrian safety and access.

Objectives

A To promote pedestrian activation of streets and public places.

B To promote ‘safer by design’ and crime prevention principles.

C To encourage pedestrian circulation at street level.

D To protect views and vistas along streets.

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05 Built form

Building form and character refers to the individual elements of building design that collectively contribute to the character and appearance of the built environment.

New built form in Gosford should strive for design excellence, deliver best practice sustainability, be of the highest quality and reflect the regional importance of the City Centre. Built form must provide an attractive and desirable setting for all of its users, including those in the public realm as well as those in buildings themselves.

Image: Australian Tax Office building (Photo by Jason Collins)

5

Built form

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Figure 6. Overview of the location of key controls in this chapter

4

2 5

6

1 3 3

3

Street setbacks and rear setbacks - see 5.2.1 Active street frontages - see 5.2.3

Fine grain frontages - see 5.2.6 Awnings - see 5.2.7

Building services and the streetscape - see 5.2.12 Street wall heights and upper podium - see 5.2.2 Building setbacks and separation - see 5.2.4 Slender towers and high amenity - see 5.2.5 Internal amenity - see 5.2.11

Building exteriors - see 5.2.17 Landscape design - see 5.2.13 Above ground parking - see 5.2.9 1

2 3 4

5 6

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5.1 Site sizes and design excellence

The GCC SEPP sets out provisions for large, medium and small sites relating to implementation of the LEP controls. The medium site and large site provisions apply only to B zones, including B3 Commercial Core, B4 Mixed Use and B6 Enterprise Corridor (Refer to Clause 8.4 in GCC SEPP).

5.2 Built form provisions

This chapter sets out the preferred building typologies across the affected zones.

Figure 7 opposite describes key setback controls across Gosford and is reference in the specific controls over the following pages.

Site Provisions

Small Site

<2800sqm; or

<36m primary street frontage

Medium Site

> = 2800 and <

5600sqm; or

> = 36m primary street frontage

Large Site

> = 5600sqm

Clause 4.6

Applies

Excluded from Height and FSR, however may be applied to site criteria

Excluded from Height and FSR, however may be applied to site criteria

Height and FSR

HOB Map FSR (2:1 - 4:1)

HOB Map FSR Map

HOB Map FSR Map

Exception

Refer to clause 8.4 of the GCC SEPP

Variations to HOB permitted subject to design excellence including review by a design review panel (refer to clause 8.4 of GCC SEPP).

Variations to HOB and FSR permitted subject to design excellence including review by a design review panel (refer to clause 8.4 of GCC SEPP).

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Legend

Residential or commercial Parking Retail

Medium-large sites in the

Commercial Core Small sites in the Commercial

Core

Outer centre - active uses Residential Areas Illustration of typical anticipated development forms

The development forms identified below are an illustration of anticipated and desirable development forms across Gosford City Centre.

Figure 7. Illustration of anticipated and desirable development forms

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T

Mann Street

Henry P arry Drive

Pacific Highway Central Coast Highway

Henry Parry Drive

1:10,000 0 100 200 300 400 500M

Figure 8. Streetscape summary Setbacks

T Legend

Front Setbacks and Street Wall Heights*

Side setbacks

Setback at ground level

Street wall height (metres)

Up to street wall

Above street wall

3-4m 6 - 14 0m 6m

3-4m 6 - 14 3m 6m

0m 6 - 14 0m 6m

0m 6 - 9.5 0m 6m

2m 6 - 14 0m 6m

5-6m 6 - 12 3m 4.5m

Other

streets 3-4m 6 - 12 3m 4.5m

Train station Railway

Gosford City Centre boundary

Primary active frontage Active laneway Through site links (see 4.1)

Investigate potential for wider setback to accommodate pedestrian movement and street tree plantings

Note: These building setback controls are to achieve breaks in between buildings and allow sunlight to the public domain. In some cases, the building separation controls in the Apartment Design Guideline may be less than the above controls.

*minimum and maximum controls - refer to Section 5.2.2.C1

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5.2.1 Street setbacks and rear setbacks

Street setback controls help to create great streetscapes and provide a good pedestrian environment. The controls ensure buildings have a consistent alignment and provide space for planting and footpaths.

Objectives

A Provide for public amenity of the street including:

– landscape and deep soil zones in appropriate locations,

– to establish the desired spatial proportions of the street and define the street edge

– to provide for high quality pedestrian amenity and activity.

B Enhance the setting and street address of the building.

C Provide front setbacks appropriate to building function and character, including entries and setbacks for ground floor apartments.

D Create a transition between public and private space.

E Maintain sun access to the public domain.

Controls

1. Buildings should be designed to comply with streetscape controls as shown in Figure 8. These setbacks should be deep soil and contain no parking structures.

2. In addition to the above, street building alignment and street setbacks are to comply with Figure 8.

Parking structures may encroach into these setbacks by up to 1m (except for 0m ground setbacks).

3. Outside the B zones (B3, B4 and B6), a minimum rear setback of 6m is required.

4. Balconies may project up to 600mm into front building setbacks, provided the the cumulative width of all balconies at that level is no more than 50% of the horizontal width of the building facade measured at that level. This control does not apply to buildings with 0m setbacks.

5. Building separation and visual privacy requirements of SEPP65 and the Apartment Design Guide will also apply as well as to the controls described above.

Note — Development involving Residential Development

For residential development, the provisions in the Apartment Design Guide and SEPP65 - Design Quality of Residential Flat Development are adopted for the purpose of this DCP and for development within Gosford City Centre. This DCP also provides additional controls applying to residential development (for example Chapters 5 Built Form and 9 Residential Development). Where this DCP is inconsistent with those policies, those policies prevail to the extent of the inconsistency.

To obtain a copy of the Apartment Design Guide and SEPP65, please see the Department’s website www.planning.nsw.gov.au

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Typical Street Section - 3m street setback locations Typical Street Section - 0m street setback locations

Mixed use building

with awning Residential building

5.2.2 Street wall heights and upper podium The street wall is the part of the building that directly addresses the street, from the ground level up to the first setback from the street boundary.

The upper podium refers to one to two storeys set back from the street wall which may have reduced side setbacks as compared to a tower (see section 5.2.5).

Objectives

A Achieve comfortable street environments for pedestrians in terms of daylight, scale, sense of enclosure and wind mitigation as well as a healthy environment for street trees.

B Reinforce the intrinsic character and scale of existing and heritage buildings in Gosford City Centre whilst also enable flexibility in contemporary building design.

C Protect solar access to key streets and public spaces.

D Encourage a strong architectural expression.

E Provide for views of the hillsides from key locations.

F Achieve a consistent and strong building line where desirable for urban design and streetscape reasons.

Controls

1. The street frontage height of buildings must comply with the minimum and maximum heights above mean ground level on the street front as shown in Figure 8.

2. All built form above the street wall height should be set back a minimum of 3m from the building line of the street wall frontage. This may include:

a. an ‘upper podium’ of up to 2 storeys/7m (in height) and side setbacks should be provided consistent with the Apartment Design Guide;

and

b. a tower element above this, which is to be consistent with the controls in Section 5.2.5 of this document.

3. For development fronting Mann Street, a building’s street wall must:

a. not be greater than 3 storeys at the building street frontage to Mann Street to maintain its existing scale, character and relative human scale, and to access to direct sunlight (refer clause 8.2 in GCC SEPP). Note - This control relates only to the ground level street wall at the building street frontage to Mann Street, and does not relate to any street wall of an upper podium that fronts Mann Street, and is set back from the (ground level) street wall.

b. comply with the height in metres as shown in Figure 8.

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5.2.3 Active street frontages and street address

Objectives

A Ensure frontages are pedestrian oriented and of high quality design to add vitality to streets.

B Provide continuity of shops along streets and lanes within the City Centre and other identified locations.

C To promote pedestrian activity and the vibrancy of Gosford.

D To provide excellent pedestrian experience in the public domain.

E To promote active and safe streets in the Gosford City Centre.

F To provide buildings with clear address and direct access to the street.

G To promote commercial and retail uses in Gosford.

Controls

1. Frontages labelled ‘primary active frontage’ on Figure 8 are to:

a. Include active uses (for example, retail and business premises) at ground level facing the street for sites within the following character areas: City North, City South and Civic Heart. For sites in other areas, high quality residential with street address may be provided at ground level b. Maximise operable and glazed shop frontages,

entries for all uses, active office uses such as reception and any other activities which provide pedestrian interest and activation

c. Minimise blank walls (with no windows or doors), fire escapes, service doors, plant and equipment hatches

d. Not include more than 12m of frontage

dedicated to office use (retail, business and other active uses should be provided at ground level) e. Provide elements of visual interest

f. Provide a high standard of architectural finish and detail

g. Not contain vehicular access unless

demonstrated to be the only suitable location on the property for such access.

2. Frontages labelled ‘active laneway’ on Figure 8 are to provide similar activation to ‘primary active frontage’, however are preferred for vehicular access where a site has a frontage to both.

3. All locations are to provide street address and direct pedestrian access off the primary street frontage.

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5.2.5 Slender towers with high amenity

Note: for the purpose of the controls below ‘tower’ refers to the part of the building above the podium’s street wall and above the upper podium (see section 5.2.2) Objectives

A Achieve high amenity for the public domain including access to sun light and views.

B Allow for view sharing and view corridors.

C Achieve an attractive city skyline which is sympathetic to the topography and context.

D Allow for high internal amenity to development, including natural light and ventilation

E Mitigate potential adverse impacts that tall and bulky buildings might have on the public domain

F Reduce the apparent bulk and scale of buildings by breaking up expanses of building wall with modulation of form and articulation of facades.

G Provide viable and useable floor space.

Controls

1. For development within the B zones (B3, B4 and B6), the maximum floorplate size for towers is:

a. 750sqm GFA for residential uses, serviced apartments and hotels.

b. 1500sqm GFA for commercial uses (office space).

Note - This maximum floor plate control applies only to towers, and not to podium level development.

2. In other zones, the maximum GFA of a tower level is 20% of the total GFA and up to 500sqm GFA max.

3. The maximum building length for towers in any direction is 45m.

4. All tower forms must be set back a minimum 8m from the street wall frontage, however reductions may be accepted (from 8m to 6m) on some sites where it is demonstrated that this control would compromise the ability to design the podium or tower appropriately.

5.2.4 Building setbacks and separation Objectives

A To provide good amenity for building occupants including daylight, outlook, visual privacy, acoustic amenity, ventilation, wind mitigation and view sharing.

B To achieve usable and pleasant streets and public domain areas.

C To maximise view corridors and maintain Gosford’s character of visual openness with the

surrounding landscape.

D Provide for the preferred building typology.

Controls

1. Minimum side setbacks up to street wall height are defined in Figure 8.

2. In addition to the above, setbacks (including front, rear and side setbacks) for residential uses, serviced apartments and hotels should be compliant with the Apartment Design Guide that accompanies SEPP65 regarding visual privacy.

3. Above the street wall height, all building facades should be well articulated to be attractive in all views. Blank walls with minimal articulation facing any boundary will not be permitted.

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Typical residential tower floor plan - approx. 750sqm GFA (NTS)

Diagram showing breaking down of bulk on long tower facades

5. All building frontages for a tower with a length over 30m should be:

a. expressed as two vertical forms

b. include a clear ‘break’ of minimum 1m width and 1m depth

c. include a stepped height difference of minimum two storeys

6. Tower heights should be varied. Where two towers are provided on one site, their height above ground level should have a minimum of 15% variation between each tower (e.g. with three towers, the tallest should be minimum 30% taller than the shortest).

7. For sites with more than one tower, separation between buildings should be considered in accordance with the specified distances for each component use, as if there is a boundary between them.

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2. Each podium form (below street wall height) is to be articulated into smaller elements at a scale or grain.

This is described in Figure 9. Each of these forms should respond to:

a. the established height datum of adjacent buildings, particularly where the street wall height proposed significantly exceeds this.

b. the established rhythm of building frontages within the area (the lot pattern) of between 5 and 20 metres.

c. the use of the building and the various components of the building.

d. the location of the building, or that part of the building relative to pedestrian or outdoor recreation activity.

e. the details and building elements including building entries, ground floor, lower floors, top floor and roof.

5.2.6 Fine grain frontages

‘Fine grain’ refers to a street frontage’s frequency and diversity of different activities, shop frontages and entries.

Objectives:

A Ensure that development responds to the human scale.

B To provide a high quality and diverse retail environment for Gosford.

C To respond to the character and grain of existing buildings at street level (even when taller buildings are provided).

D Provide a variety of architectural character.

E Ensure that the scale, modulation and facade articulation of development responds to its context.

Figure

Figure 1.  Character Areas
Figure 2.  On-site public domain improvementsTrain station
Figure 3.  Key open spaces solar access
Figure 4.  Topography, key views and vistas 1:12,500 0 100 200 300 400 500M
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References

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