• No results found

2008 HSC Notes from the Marking Centre

N/A
N/A
Protected

Academic year: 2023

Share "2008 HSC Notes from the Marking Centre "

Copied!
44
0
0

Loading.... (view fulltext now)

Full text

2009 Copyright Study Board NSW for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales. This document contains material prepared by the Board of Studies NSW for and on behalf of the State of New South Wales. No part of the Material may be reproduced in any material form in Australia or in any other country by any process, electronic or otherwise, or transmitted to any other person or stored electronically in any form without the prior written permission of the Board of Studies NSW. except as permitted by the Copyright Act 1968.

Students in NSW schools and teachers in NSW schools may copy reasonable portions of the Material for the purposes of research or study in good faith. This document has been prepared for teachers and candidates of the English Language Stage 6 course.

It contains comments on candidates' answers to the 2008 Higher School Certificate examination, indicating the quality of the answers and highlighting their relative strengths and weaknesses. This document should be read in conjunction with the relevant syllabus, the 2008 Higher School Certificate Examinations, Assessment Guidelines and other supporting documents developed by the Board of Studies to aid teaching and learning in English (standard) and English (Advanced) courses. Candidates should be encouraged to treat each text on its own merits, bearing in mind that the field of study should be used as a conceptual framework to be applied to the texts concerned.

English (Standard) and English (Advanced) Paper 1 – Area of ​​study. f) insufficient textual detail in their answers, or simply stating the content of their two chosen texts.

5

5

Weaker responses briefly recounted the events of the film with fleeting reference to the commentary and/or concept, and often demonstrated superficial understanding of film techniques. Candidates combined their personal response to the question with a skillful assessment of texts, drawing perceptive conclusions in relation to their thesis and understanding of the commentary and concept. Stronger responses showed a clear sense of purpose and took the commentary and used it as a point of analysis, synthesis and assessment of the text against the commentary.

Stronger reactions explored the philosophical premise of the film and related it to the commentary on the human spirit in terms of the protagonist, responder and points of metaphysical and. Weaker responses often corresponded to the comment and told elements of the narrative or character development. Stronger responses showed a perceptive appreciation of the ideas represented and related the thematic concerns of the poet to the commentary and concept.

Stronger developed responses demonstrated a personal understanding of the text and explored how Guido's strong human spirit is represented.

Module A: Experience Through Language

Module B: Close Study of Text

Better responses demonstrated a deep understanding of the text's central concerns, detailed textual knowledge, and skillful analysis. They demonstrated the ability to synthesize the central concerns of the text with the concluding paragraph of each text. Some of these weaker responses struggled to show understanding of the concluding part of their text or to link it to the central concerns of the text.

These responses showed a stronger personal engagement with the idea/ideas, indicating a clear understanding of the connection between his distinctive qualities as a writer and the central issues of the novel. Many responses were limited to the very violent beginning of the text and it was difficult to connect with the final lines. Weaker responses were mostly limited to narration or struggled to draw a connection between the last lines and distinctive features of the text.

Better responses showed a thorough understanding of the characters of Bea and Darcy and how their characters were used by Thomson to explore a number of central concerns. Weaker responses often showed a superficial and sometimes confused and inaccurate understanding of the play's events and characters. These better responses selected appropriate and relevant textual detail to. motivating their discussion of the central concerns of the play.

The better responses showed a thorough knowledge and understanding of the closing speech and the play itself, and confidently connected their discussion of Richard's speech to the key issues of the play. They were imprecise in their knowledge and understanding, which affected their ability to connect the closing speech with the rest of the play. The better responses combined the central concerns of the text with the closing frames by discriminating the selection of scenes from the text as a whole.

Module C: Texts and Society

The range of concerns analyzed in these responses moved them beyond the more limited and singular view of the film as a study only of the 'clash of cultures'. The best answers also built a purposeful and skillful argument, which was well supported by a close, detailed study of the scenes. Many responses were fluid, structured and integrated analyses, which were typified by an ease and precision in using the language of the visual text, detailing how film techniques shaped meaning.

Weaker responses tended to address only one central concern, usually the 'clash of cultures' or the romance. Some responses ignored or focused on the frames without connecting them to the text as a whole. Answers to this question indicate that candidates experienced some relevance between the concept of this elective and their own experience, which often enabled a strong personal voice.

Better responses demonstrated a conceptual awareness of venturing into the world and its inherent challenges and used their texts to explore this awareness. Answers where it was clear that candidates were selective in their choice of related texts were clearly able to fully address the demands of the question. Weaker responses relied on narrating the actions of characters or making judgments about attitudes or venturing into the world.

These answers were often about text(s) in themselves and little effort was made to link their discussion to the question of whether the texts are connected.

Module A: Comparative Study of Texts and Context

Module B: Critical Study of Texts

Most responses demonstrated an understanding of the ways narrative techniques reveal memorable ideas and drew on appropriate aspects of the novel to support their analysis. These responses demonstrated a keen understanding of the relationship between ideas, audience, and context, and evaluated narrative techniques in light of their deep engagement with the broader issues of the text. The best answers demonstrated an ability to analyze memorable ideas through a skillful evaluation of narrative techniques including setting, characterization, use of narrator, symbolism, and contrast.

In examining narrative techniques such as Fish's role as narrator, setting, structure and characterization, candidates analyzed complex ideas such as the metaphorical level of the text. Weaker responses relied on a superficial identification of various readings of the text without showing any obvious personal involvement. They demonstrated a detailed understanding of the relationship between cinematic techniques and memorable ideas and supported their analysis with carefully selected examples.

A strong personal commitment was evident in the way these responses linked the film's context to the candidate's own world and in their analysis of the film's language. They showed a perceptive understanding of the poems, made a close textual reference and presented a synthesized treatment of the relationship between ideas, audience and context. Better answers presented a synthesized discussion of the role poetic techniques played in revealing memorable ideas and demonstrated an understanding of the relationship between Yeats's context and the complex ideas developed in his poetry.

They demonstrated a clear understanding of the role of context in the formation of meaning, and were characterized by informed personal engagement and perceptive knowledge of the text. They showed a keen understanding of the relationship between ideas, audience and context, and skillfully drew on other perspectives to explore the difference between East and West. The responses were usually limited to the description of individual events rather than a contextual analysis that would encompass the broader historical focus of the text.

Module C: Representation and Text

Candidates demonstrated an understanding of the interplay between 'History and Memory' through an evaluation of the medium of production, textual form and linguistic features. Weaker responses described aspects of the historical events in the texts and referred superficially to the associated memories represented. Effectively explain their views on which two texts most strongly represent the uncertainties of the journey.

Explain your view of which two texts most strongly represent the uncertainty of travel. Demonstrates a highly developed understanding of the concept of physical/inner/imaginary travel in relation to commentary. Demonstrates a well-developed understanding of the concept of physical/internal/imaginary journeys in relation to commentary.

Demonstrate an adequate understanding of the concept of physical/inner/imaginative journeys in relation to the commentary. Demonstrates a limited understanding of the concept of physical/inner/imaginative journeys in relation to the commentary. Demonstrate an elementary understanding of the concept of physical/inner/imaginative journeys in relation to the commentary.

Presents a point of view based on detailed textual knowledge of key fragments/images and a well-developed understanding of the ideas and techniques of the texts. Presents an answer based on adequate text knowledge of fragments/images and adequate understanding of the ideas and techniques of the texts. Attempts to answer based on limited textual knowledge of fragments/images and limited understanding of the ideas and techniques of the texts.

Demonstrates some analysis of how the extract brings together the central concerns of the text. Demonstrates limited understanding of the relationship between the extract and the concerns of the text.

References

Related documents

In your answers you will be assessed on how well you: ■ demonstrate understanding of the ways language shapes and expresses perceptions Question 1 25 marks Text one — Extract from a