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JOURNAL OF PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL VICTORIAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS

IN ALLIANCE WITH THE ROYAL INSTITUTE OF BRITISH ARCHITECTS JI

r i r rGrü 1-1111t mnmt mFimtY

JULY, 1926

MELBOURNE-DUDLEY BUILDINGS, 525-527 COLLINS STREET WEST

eë ISSUED SIX TIMES YEARLY êN

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W. S. P. GODFREY K. A. HENDERSON

R. B. HAMILTON

R. H. ALSOP W. A. M. BLACIiETT

W. M. CAMPBELL.

E. J. CLARK W. A. DRUMMOND

A. S. EGGLESTON J. S. GAWLER R. B. HAMILTON W. A. HENDERSON L. F. IRWIN

OFFICERS ANI? COMMITTEES FOR 1926-27

President P. A. OAKLEY

First Vice-President .. .. W. A. M. BLACKETT Second Vice-President .. .. P. B. HUDSON Hon. Treasurer .. .. .. .. E. EVAN SMITH Hon. Secretary . .. .. W. M. CAMPBELL Hon. Assistant Secretary .. W. A. DRUMMOND

MEMBERS OF COUNCIL S. S. MURDOCH FRANK STAPLEY Associate Members

L. F. IRWIN F. SALE ADVISORY AND EMERGENCY COMMITTEE W. S. P. GODFREY P. B. HUDSON ARTHUR PECK K. A. HENDERSON P. A. OAKLEY FRANK STAPLEY

REGULATIONS COMMITTEE

E. A. BATES P. B. - HUDSON FRANK STAPT.EY K. A. HENDERSON P. A. OAKLEY H. W. TOMPKINS

FINANCE COMMITTEE.

W. M. CAMPBELL P A OAKLEY E. EVAN SMITH BOARD OF EXAMINERS

G. R. Ii1NG G. J. SUTHERLAND A. G. STEPHENSON J. H. WARDROP C. E. WRIGHT EXAMINERS R.I.B.A.

R. H. ALSOP 7 S. GAWLER A. G. STEPHENSON. A.R.I.B.A.

W. R. BUTLER, F.R.I.R.A. L. F. IRWIN, A.R.I.I3.A. J. H. WARDROP, A.R.I.B.A.

LIBRARY AND SOCIAL COMMITTEE

H. W. TOMPKINS

7N. K. CIIEETIIAM W. A. DRUMAIONO

R. B. HAMILTON L. F. IRWIN JOURNAL OF PROCEEDINGS COMMITTEE W. M. CAMPBELL P. A. OAKLEY

J. H. HARVEY, Editor E. EVAN SMITH JOINT ROOMS COMMITTEE

W. M. CAMPBELL E. EVAN SMITH P. A. OAIü.EY

FEDERAL COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES IC. A. HENDERSON P. A. OAKLEY

R.V.I.A. WAR MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP TRUSTEES.

E. A. BATES K. A. HENDERSON P. B. HUDSON

UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE ARCHITECTURAL BOARD OF STUDIES

S. GAWLER (Chairman) W. S. P. GODFREY P A. OAKLEY T. H. ALSOP L. F. IRWIN Sir J. MONASH, K.C.B, E. J. CLARK K. A. HENDERSON E. EVAN SMITH

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A CTIVITIES OF THE COUNCIL SINCE PUBLICATION OF ISSUE FOR MAY

RIME COSTINC.—Phe Council has had several con- ferences with representatives of the Master Builders' Association regarding "prime costing" and the sub-

ject will be further considered at the next Council meeting.

Public Health Commission.—The Council lately approached the Minister of Public Health with reference to the desirability of appointing an Architect as a member of the Health Commis- sion, and since the interview, Alderman Frank Stapley (F.) has been appointed a member.

Visit of Members to Canberra.-A visit of members of the Institute to Canberra, to take place about the month of October next is projected. Further particulars will be supplied to mem- bers at a later date.

Victorian War Memorial.--The Council has discussed the proposition which has been made for the creation of a square in front of the Houses of Parliament as "The Victorian War Memorial," and the following resolution was passed and for- warded to the Premier, the Lord Mayor, the Town Clerk and

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the Press :—"That the Council of this Institute is of opinion that the Architects whose design was selected in open competi- tion for the Victorian War Memorial, proposed to be erected on the Domain site in Melbourne, should be directly employed as the Architects for any substituted Memorial which may be pro- jected for any other site." The Council refrained from express- ing any opinion regarding the proposed square in front of Parliament Houses until further details become available.

R.V.I.A. EXAMINATION IN PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE.

The following students who hold the Diploma of Architec- ture of the Melbourne University, having passed the above Ex- amination, are now eligible for nomination as Associates of the Institute :—Miss Annie G. Marwick, Miss Lorna B. Lee, and Messrs. L. G. Cahn, O. A. Yuncken, L. G. Liscombe, F. N.

Norris.

lietívíties of Council since Publication of IflJag íssue b4

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T HE FIRST HALF-CENTURY OF THE ROYAL VICTORIAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS

FEW years ago, Mr. J. A. Gotch, the ex-President of the R.I.B.A., read a paper before the members of that Institute in which he reviewed its activities during the first fifty years of its career. In this, he referred among other things, to the occasion upon which the Prince Consort visited the Institute and distributed the prizes for the year. One of these awards was the Soane Medallion which was awarded to Mr. Arthur Ebden Johnson, an old member and former President of the R.V.I.A.

Mr. Johnson's connection with the R.I.B.A. having been interrupted for many years in consequence of his residence in Australia, those members who were resident in England had become out of touch with him, and Mr. Gotch, in the course of his remarks, asked "Who were the medallists, Messrs. Chamber- lain and Johnson ?" This query suggested to me the writing of a short article relating to the career of Mr. Johnson as, having been a pupil of that Architect, I was more or less acquainted with some of his doings in Australia. That article, which was

65 [an

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be firstlalf=Century of the 11t.>t1.1E, 1, 66 an answer to the question asked by Mr. Gotch, I forwarded to Mr. Ian MacAlister, Secretary to the R.I.B.A., and it was sub- sequently published in the Journal of that Institute.

In commenting upon this case, Mr. MacAlister suggested that I might undertake the chronicling of the progress of the Victorian Institute over a similar period and thus perform for the R.V.I.A., what Mr. Gotch had done for the R.LB.A., and having at last found an opportunity to engage in this work, I will endeavour to record some of the proceedings which led to the formation of our Institute in the early days of the practice of what may be termed "Legitimate Architecture," in Melbourne.

—Ed.

The first attempt to organise an institution for the elevation of Architecture and the benefit of the profession in Victoria, was made in the year 1856. During the "boom" which existed in "The Golden Days of the Fifties," many brilliant young men were attracted to Victoria, not solely with the idea of amassing wealth, but to take advantage of the wide field which the phenomenal growth of the Colony, and of the towns of Mel*

bourne, Ballarat, Bendigo, Geelong and Castlemaine offered for the exercise of their talents. Hence, Victoria absorbed much of the flower of the adventurous educated and able youth of the older countries of the world, and to that leaven is to be ascribed the almost miraculous progress which was made in scientific, commercial and social affairs in the course of a very few years and the fact that this, the smallest of the States on the main- land of Australia, has been able to maintain so prominent a posi- tion up to the present time. Among those who contributed to the stream of immigration were doctors, lawyers, architects, artists, literary giants, and other professional and cultivated men of every kind.

In building circles, things had progressed to such an extent by the middle of the year 1856 that the Architects practising in Melbourne felt that the time had arrived at which it was desirable that they should form an Association for the purposes of the protection of their interests and of the elevation of the practice of Architecture. Accordingly, a meeting was convened by a circular which was signed by Messrs. T. Watts and T. J.

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Ube jfirit 1balt-ZenturZ of the 112.1).1.ït.

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Crouch, and which was held at the office of Mr. Crouch, in Swanston Street, Melbourne, on 9th July, 1856. The object of this meeting was "To take into consideration the desirability of establishing an Architectural Association in Melbourne."

There were present at the meeting Messrs. J. G. Knight, T.

Watts, A. L. Smith, F. Rodgers, A. T. Snow, T. J. Crouch and P. Kerr. Mr. Peter Kerr presided and Mr. J. T. Crouch acted as Secretary pro. tern.

It was moved by Mr. Snow, seconded by Mr. Rodgers, that Messrs. Knight, Watts, Smith and Crouch form a provisional Committee to draw up rules for submission to a future and fuller meeting, and on the motion of Mr. Smith, the following gentle- men were invited to attend the next meeting :—Messrs. J. Reed, C. Laing, C. Webb,

L.

Tayler, F. M. White, J. Balmain, D. Ross, A. E. Johnson, O. Bagge, F. Kursteiner, A. Purchas, S. H. Mer- rett, T. H. Merrett, J. Schnieder, C. R. Swyer, — Barnes, — Vicars, and — George.

At a subsequent meeting held on July 31st, Mr. Swyer pre- sided and Mr. Knight, as Chairman of the provisional Com- mittee, submitted a report and introduced the proposed rules.

It was then moved by Mr. Knight "That an Association of Architects be formed, having for its objects `The cultivation of friendly intercourse between the members of the profession, the protection and advancement of its interests and the elevation of Architecture as an Art.' "

This was seconded by Mr. Watts, after which the proposed rules were read and it was ordered that they be printed. The meeting was then adjourned to the 14th August upon which date those interested were to meet in the hall of the Mechanics' Institute at 3 p.m. to discuss the rules.

On August 14th, the following were present :—Messrs.

Swyer, Watts, Hale, Robertson, Schnieder, Bagge, Smith, Kerr, Ross, Scanlon, George, Rodgers, Matthews, Blackburn, Purchas, Tayler and Crouch. (Present, but late, were Messrs. Knight and Snow.) Mr. Swyer presided. It was then moved by Mr.

[Watts

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be ffíriit lbalf-denturv of the 1R.W.11.B. 68

Watts, "That prior to the consideration of the rules, the mem- bers of the profession now present, do form themselves into an Association of Architects and that the names of Messrs. Knight and Snow, who by that time had arrived, should be added, and that they should be entitled to like privileges in the formation of the Institute." This was seconded by Mr. Crouch and carried.

Thus was "The Victorian Institute of Architects" founded on the 21st August, 1856.

The constitution provided that the Institute should consist of "Members," who should be Architects practising in Victoria at least 12 months prior to admission, "Honorary Members,"

who should be gentlemen distinguished by scientific or literary attainments, and Architects not practising in Victoria, and "As- sociates," who should be pupils of members, architectural drafts- men and architects who have not been in practice for twelve months in Victoria. The affairs of the Institute were to be regulated by a "Patron" who should be an Hon. Member, a President, Treasurer, Hon. Secretary, and a Council of five.

The first General Meeting was held at the office of Mr.

Crouch on 28th August, 1856, when there were present Messrs..

Knight, Watts, Purchas, Rodgers, Tayler, Blackburn and Crouch.

Mr. J. G. Knight presided, and the following Council was elected : President, J. G. Knight ; Treasurer, C. R. Swyer ; Hon. Secretary, T. J. Crouch ; Council—P. Kerr, A. Purchas, A. L. Smith, T.

Watts, F. M. White.

(Mr. J. Reed was the first member of the Institute who was elected, and that was at a meeting which was held on the 11th September, but it appears also from the minutes, that he was .ballotted for at a meeting held on the 13th of November

following.)

It was decided to ask the Hon. Capt. Pasley, Commissioner of Public Works, to accept the office of Patron.

The Institute being now a going concern, several meetings were held at the office of the Public Works Dept., Melbourne.

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'Ube jFírst 7batt=Centurg ot tbe 69

At a meeting held on 2nd October, 1856, Bye-Laws regulat- ing professsional charges and conditions for competitions were adopted and at a meeting which was held on October 9th, at the Public Works Office, Mr. J. G. Knight delivered an Inaugural Address.

Among early elected members who afterwards became pro- minent were C. Maplestone, L. Terry, C. Webb, N. Billing, N.

Chevalier (the well known artist) and W. H. Ellerker. In the

"Age" of December 12th is an account of a meeting of the Insti- tute held on the previous day at which it was decided that drawings should remain the property of the Architect.

In the early part of 1857 the question of the amalgamating of the professions of Architecture and Engineering was dis- cussed, but no further action appears to have been taken. In April, 1857, a committee was appointed to draw up, a report con- cerning the Melbourne Building Act.

On June 22nd, 1857, the President read a paper on "The Necessity for Providing a Museum for testing the Value and Quality of the Building Materials of the Colony" and it was resolved that a sub-committee should memorialise the Govern- ment regarding the placing of an amount of £1000 on the esti- mates during the year 1857 and £500 in 1858 for the furthering of that project.

On the 9th July, 1857, meetings commenced at the office of Mr. Tayler, and Mr. Ross read a paper relating to "The Desir- ability of Beautifying and Rendering Useful some of the Reserves and Waste Corners of Melbourne." (This record is of consider- able interest, as it shews that the idea of improving the appear- ance of the City by the development of landscape gardening is not altogether the modern notion which most people are disposed to consider it.)

On October 13th, 1857, a Conversazione was held at St.

Patrick's Hall on which occasion His Excellency the Governor, the Mayor of Melbourne, the President of the Legislative Coun- cil, the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly, and other leading

[citizens

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the first 1balf=¢enture of the 1R.V.11.t.

70

citizens were present. At that function the President read a paper and addresses were delivered by Professors McCoy and Wilson, Dr. McAdam, and Messrs. F. Wilkinson and R. Horne.

At a meeting held on November 12th it was resolved that meet- ings be held quarterly.

It was announced at a meeting held in January, 1858, that the Government had set apart a quarter of an acre of land near the Public Works Office, upon which a Building Museum could be erected, and the President stated that he had been instructed by Captain Pasley to prepare drawings for such a building which would be commenced immediately ; also that Captain Clarke, who had left for England a few days before. had under- taken to obtain selections of building materials in England, and that he (Mr. Knight) and Capt. Pasley would be glad to receive suggestions for the carrying into effect of the ideas contemplated in connection with the establishment of the Museum.

New office-bearers were then elected. President, Mr. J. G.

Knight ; Treasurer, Mr. Swyer ; Hon. Secretary, Mr. T. J. Crouch ; Council—Messrs. Billing, Gill, Tayler, Terry, Watts, White. (It will be noted that the number of members of Council had been increased.) At a meeting held on March 25th, a "Treatise on Street Architecture" was read by the President. On 28th Feb., 1859, Mr. A. E. Johnson was formally elected a member.

About this time considerable discussion took place regarding the competition for the New General Post Office, the conducting of which did not appear to find favour with the members.

We next find it recorded that the Surveyor General had communicated with the Institute respecting the laying down of a standard of measurement, and that the meeting at which the matter was introduced considered that the New Building Museum would be a suitable place for the purpose. Pipes, "Chimney flues" and roofing tiles manufactured in Victoria were about this time brought under the notice of members.

At a meeting held on 21st March, 1859, the discovery of a new deposit of sandstone resembling that which was being used

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Ube fast 1iJalt-Century ot tbe 1R.11).11.it.

in the new Treasury Building was announced. The locality of the quarry was Bacchus Marsh, and the stone was spoken of as

"Darley Stone" the face of the quarry being said to be 200 feet in'height.

On July 18th, 1859, Mr. Knight read a long and interesting paper on Victorian Building Stones.

At the same meeting, many prominent gentlemen were elected Honorary Members, these being Messrs. C. Bright, Clement Hodgkinson (Assistant Commissioner of Lands and Sur- vey), N. Chevalier (the well known artist), C. W. Ligar (Sur- veyor General), J. S. MacKennal, Professor F. McCoy, Mr. A. K.

Smith, Jas. Smith, Chas. Summers (the sculptor) .

(It is interesting to note that at a meeting which was held on April 18th, 1859, Mr. B. C. Aspinal, one of the most brilliant barristers in Australia, was elected an Honorary Memler.) The Rev. Dr. Bleasdale was also an Honorary Member and he pre- sided at a meeting on one occasion. Eugene Von Guerard (the well known painter of Australian Landscape) was also among those who accepted Honorary membership.)

At the Annual Meeting held on 18th August, 1859, the Annual Report for 1858-59 was read, and the following items of information are taken from that Report.

"With the exception of some Government and a few private buildings, the principal edifices in the metropolis are entrusted to the charge of gentlemen who are members of the Institute."

"The Institute has gained in strength, and it now embraced nearly all the Architects practising in Melbourne and consisted of 27 members, three associates and several honorary members the number of which was to be increased by 15 at that meeting, and the Council thought that by seeking the counsel and sym- pathy of such members of other professions as have exhibited any interest in Architecture, the Institute would derive con- siderable advantage. The feeling was expressed, however, that no one should be introduced as an honorary member out of mere compliment to his name or social position. The standard of qualification should be intellectual capacity and a belief that the [person

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Ube first lba[f=¢enturg of the 72 person nominated felt a genuine interest in some of the branches connected with Architecture."

"When the hall of the `Museum for Building Materials' is completed, the Council would recommend the Institute to apply to the Minister of Public Works for permission to hold its meet- ings therein. The Council also hoped that it would be found practicable to establish a school of Art instruction in connection with the Building Museum and several well qualified Artists had signified their willingness to teach in various branches of the Arts. The Council considered also, that the Institute should be made accessible to country practitioners." "It is gratifying to note that in the majority of instances, the quality of workman- ship indicates superiority over the average of earlier attempts, which is attributed, in a great measure, to the general abolition of `piece-work.' "

"In the comments that have been publicly made on some rather unfortunate attempts at city improvement, a lack of Architectural taste has been frequently complained of ; but the cause of failure has been more frequently due to the lack of adequate means than to the want of professional ability to pro- duce suitable designs."

The financial statement for the year was audited by Messrs.

Lloyd Tayler and Alfred L. Smith.

At a meeting held on 27th February, 1860, Mr. J. G. Knight made some further "Observations on the Building Stones of the Colony," more particularly referring to "Darley Dale" and

"Bacchus Marsh."

On May 25th, 1860, the first official Dinner of the Institute took place, as on that evening it is chronicled that "prior to the meeting, the members had dined together." At this meeting, among other business, a committee was appointed to revise the rules, and Dr. Mackenna read a paper on "Ventilation."

On August 28th, 1860, Mr. J. J. Clark was elected a member, and Mr. J. G. Knight reported that the Minister of Public Works desired that the Institute should nominate one of its Members

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Ube first lhalt=Centttrg of the 1R.11).11.R. 73

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as a trustee of the "Building Museum." Mr. Knight was nominated.

At the Annual Meeting which was held on 11th September, 1860, Mr. J. G. Knight was re-elected President ; Mr. T. J.

Crouch, Hon. Secretary; and a new Council was elected.

(Probably in consequence of the wave of depression which followed the very rapid progress made in "The Golden Days,"

and which was brought about by the exhausting of the supply of easily won gold, the attendances of members appear to have exhibited a falling off about this time. Meetings were, however, held on March 6th and April 16th, 1861, and on November 1st, 1861, Mr. J. Gill was elected President and Mr. T. J. Crouch was re-elected Hon. Secretary. At a meeting held on 7th March, 1865, action was taken to memorialise the Legislative Assembly to prohibit officers of the Public Works Department engaging in private practice, and on May 10th, 1865, the same matter was dealt with. After that date there is no record of any meeting until 1871.

As was previously remarked, the prolific yields of gold which had given so great an impetus to the affairs of Victoria during the "fifties," and which had assisted in bringing about what was practically a social, commercial and industrial revolution through- out the world, had become so greatly reduced by the exhaustion.

of the more shallow alluvial fields—quartz mining was only in its infancy at the time, and "deep sinking" into the rich alluvial drifts, the prosecution of which required capital, had hardly commenced on a very extensive scale, and this combined with the exodus of great numbers to the newly discovered gold-fields of New Zealand and Queensland, effectually damped enterprise and the roseate times were at an end.

When it comes to be considered that from the year 1852 to 1860, gold to the value of between £90,000,000 and

£100,000,000 sterling had been produced in Victoria, it can be easily understood that the cessation of such a vast income had a very disastrous effect upon the development of the southern Colony. It was little wonder, therefore, that there was a reduc- [tion

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74

tion in building operations and with that, in the employment of Architects. The straitened condition of things accounted for some of the leading Architects finding their way into the Public Service.

In consequence of the opening up of the country by agricul- ture and the introduction of manufacturing, Victoria gradually regained much of its lost prosperity, and when the early "seven- ties" were reached, things had made such progress that it was felt by the Architects of Melbourne that an effort might be made to resuscitate the old Association of Architects and eventually that was effected. The preliminary proceeding which again brought the members of the profession together was the holding of a meeting for the purpose of instituting a charitable fund for distressed and reduced members of the profession. (The fact that such a step had become necessary told its own tale.)

At that meeting, at which Mr. W. T. Gore occupied the chair, it was unanimously agreed "That steps be taken to form a Society of Architects, and Messrs. T. Watts and P. Matthews were ap- pointed to wait upon the various Architects in the City, to solicit their co-operation.

A meeting was held at the Criterion Hotel, Melbourne (which stood upon the site in Collins St. which is now occupied by the offices of the Union Bank of Australia), on Nov. 3rd, 1871, at which there were present :-Messrs. F. Barnes (in the chair) , L. Tayler, T. Watts, J. Flannagan, W. J. Ellis, C. Vicars, R.

Adamson, T. Taylor, P. Matthews, W. T. Gore, W. H. Ellerker and Conlon, and after some discussion, it was moved by Mr.

T. Watts, seconded by Mr. J. Flannagan, and carried, "That a society be now formed, to be called `The Victorian Institute of Architects' and the following gentlemen were appointed a sub- committee to draw up rules and bye-lays :—Messrs. W. T. Gore, T. Watts, L. Tayler, J. Flannagan, C. Vicars, P. Matthews and F. Barnes. The meeting was then adjourned to November 13th.

(To be continued.)

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R. V.I. f1. Journal of Proceedings, July, 1926

NEW BUILDING IN COLLINS PLACE FOR ALLIED SOCIETIES TRUST.

Condition of works on 15th July, 1926.

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ALLIED SOCIETIES BUILDING

HE new building in Collins Place has now reached the fourth floor, the material for the walls of this storey being about to be poured.

A development has recently taken place in con- nection with the proposed club, provision for which has been made on this floor. The prospect of a large number of profes- sional men becoming members has been so encouraging, that the committee which was appointed to advise upon the question, has recommended to • the Trust that further rooms forming part of a new storey be added, these to embrace a Dining Room with the necessary Kitchen, pantry and other attendant accommoda- tion ; this will involve an increase of about ten feet in the height of the front elevation, and the Architects for the building have already prepared a scheme for this additional height in Collins Place. The lower portion of the building will not be altered in any way but the additional height will be in the plain part of the.

"shaft," and that will effect an improvement in the main facade.

The Main Hall is now assuming form and it promises to become a very attractive feature, the lower walls being panelled and the side walls having wooden "pilaster" treatment. Enquiries have already been made for the leasing of the Hall on certain

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~t[Iíeò %oeíetfes 7Buítafuo. 76

days. The Committee Rooms are developing well and they should afford bright, cheerful housing accommodation for the various bodies interested. Applications for accommodation on the "show"

or "booth" floors are coming in freely. (These are the second and third floors.) A small alteration has been made in the Library, the gallery in which, in lieu of being supported by columns from the Library floor, as had been originally proposed, has been hung from the ceiling, thus providing a clear, unbroken Library floor.

The space for the storing of old books, documents, plans, etc., which is carried along the whole of the southern corridor, and over the strong-room on the south side of the building, will be a great acquisition to all the societies participating.

It is hoped that many members of the societies will join the club and so help the general scheme along. Messrs. Ashworth, Godfrey & Kenyon were appointed a committee to investigate club possibilities, and Mr. Ashworth has been absolutely untir- ing in his efforts to bring about the formation of a good club, the details of which will be given later.

(A photo-engraving illustrating the condition of the building on the 15th of July is incorporated in this issue of the Journal.)

The Secretary to the Trust will be glad to receive further applications for Debentures.

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T HE LIBRARY.

[NOTE. In consequence of the wave of industrial trouble which has swept over Britain lately, the delivery of many periodi- cals has been seriously interfered with and those that are arriving reach their destination very irregularly.]

OURNAL OF THE R.I.B.A.—Under the dates given the following items will probably be found of inter- est. 6th March, a paper, together with discussion, on "The Paris Exhibition of Decorative Art." 20th March, an article by Professor J. Hubert Worthing- ton, M.A., dealing with a recently published volume on "The Life and Works of Baldassare Peruzzi of Siena. An article on

"Architecture from the Structural Point of View," by Professor A. E. Richardson and a description of a "lime-wash" which has been found successful as a stone preservative. 10th April, an illustrated paper and description of "The Making, Prevention and Unmaking of a Slum." This is written in an easy conversa- tional style and will be found both interesting and informative, and the discussion upon it, being given in the same number, renders the item extremely valuable. There is also in this issue an illustrated article on "Old Bridges in France."

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abe 9Líbrarg. 78 Under date 24th April, appears the Official Report of the Council for the year 1924-1925.

Under date June 12th the following appear :—Abstract of a paper on "Gardens" (illustrated), an article on "The Stone Decay and Preservation of Ancient Buildings," by Prof. A. P.

Laurie ; a review of a volume entitled "The Preservation of Rural England," by Prof. P. Abercrombie, together with other reviews; also the discussion on the Annual Report of the R.I.B.A, ARCHITECTURE (SYDNEY) .—The June issue contains a suggestive article by Wm. Moore, on "The Anonymity of Archi- tecture." (Apropos of this, it would appear that there exists a strong feeling among many Architects that the name of the designer should appear on the building of which he is the author.

This number also contains a design for the "Circular Quay Park- ing Station," Sydney, for which it is proposed to utilise Mort's Wool Warehouses.

There are also Notes on the new building for "The Evening News" and an account of the Annual Dinner of the New South Wales Institute of Architects.

THE BUILDER (London).—In such numbers as have come to hand are the following :—April 16th, an interesting article on

"The Ugliness of Engineering Structures." (This might be read profitably in conjunction with the lecture entitled "Art and Engineering" which was delivered before the Victorian Institute of Engineers about two or three years ago, by Mr. J. T. Noble Anderson, M.Inst.C.E., and with the paper on "The Church Street Bridge" read before the R.V.I.A. by Mr. T. R. Ashworth.) There are also illustrations of "The Russell School" at Addington, Surrey (England), and a report of "The Building Exhibition."

April 23rd has the second prize design for "The Royal Hospital School at Holbrook," the "Cecil Theatre," Hull, and further notes relating to the "Building Exhibition." On April 30th appear reproductions from some of the drawings of "The Old Bridges of France" ; "Greyfriars Church," Aberdeen ; "A Memorial Chapel in York Minster" ; illustrations of "The Royal Scottish Auto-

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mobile Club Buildings," Glasgow; and further competition draw- ing for the "Royal Hospital School," Holbrook.

ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW (London).—The May num- ber contains several illustrations of "The Kensington Cinema"

(London) ; an illustrated article on "The Making of Gardens";

an illustrated article on "Domestic Ironwork"; drawings of "The Deaf and Dumb Asylum," Lower Clapton ; and a very interesting

"Craftsmanship Supplement."

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHI- TECTS.—The number for June last contains an illustrated article on "Tudor Homes and Ours," Pencil Sketches entitled "In a French Province," illustrations of Fourteenth Century Italian Sculpture and a report of the 59th Annual Convention of the American Architects.

THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT.—Under date May 20th are some illustrations of the work of the late H. H. Richardson ; photographs of the premiated design for a Memorial to Theodore Roosevelt in Washington, D.C. ; an article on "Interior Architec- ture" and many portraits of those who took part in the "Con- vention." The number for 5th June has "A Spanish Interlude"

(illustrated) ; "The Pictorial Aspect of Old English Towns"

(illustrated) ; illustrations of "The University Club," Milwaukee, Wis.; also prints of "Arsenal Building," Seventh Avenue, New York ; an article on "Electric Power for Buildings" (extensively illustrated by diagrams; an article on "The Economical Advan- tages of Good Architecture and Decoration."

The number for 20th June is devoted principally to "The Apartment House," that term having apparently displaced the word "Flats." There are also articles on "Steam Cleaning a Stone Building," and other matters.

THE BUILDER (London).—In the issue for June 4th appears a Leader on "The Smoke Problem of London" ; illustra- tions of "The Winning Design in the Masonic Peace Memorial Competition" ; "A Study for the South Approach of the New Lambeth Bridge" by Sir Reg. Bloomfield, R.A. ; a review by Prof.

[Lethaby

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be líbrArp. so Lethaby, on a book dealing with Pre-Hellenic Architecture; and an article on "The Preservation of Ancient Cottages." There are also engravings of the Masonic Peace Memorial Building which is to be erected in Great Queen Street, London, adjoining the classic Freemasons' Hall structure which was designed by Professor F. P. Cockerell in the "sixties."

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V ICTORIAN ARCHITECTURAL STUDENTS' SOCIETY OF THE

R V.I.A.

HE following communication has been received from the Students' Society. The members of the Society are congratulated upon the enterprise which has prompted them to organise a Journal in which the proceedings of the Society may be recorded and matters of interest to students dealt with.

Dear Sir,

We wish to bring to the notice of Institute Members the revival of the Students' Magazine, realizing the success of the venture depends on the co-operation of our parent body, and we would, through your journal, seek their support.

We feel that the Students' Society of to-day is the Institute of to-morrow, and desire at all times to shape our efforts so that they will be worthy of the Institute of which we trust to become members.

We hope to make this Journal of extreme interest to all connected with our profession. Not merely from a student's point of view, but desire to hold the support of your Members by the quality of our articles.

We would ask all in the profession to become subscribers, and so put our venture on that financial footing so necessary to the success of a publication of this nature.

Thanking you and your Members in anticipation for their initial and continued support.

I am,

Yours faithfully,

HARRY S. WINBUSH,

for the V.A.S.S. Magazine Committee.

si [Along

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ALONG THE BYE-PATHS

R. C. N. Hollinshed.—Mr. Hollinshed (A.) is con- gratulated upon having been elected an Associate of the R.I.B.A.

A Note on Vandalism.—In the "Builder," of 12th March last, regret is expressed that "the desire to create and enjoy a picturesque and pleasant home on a small scale is so widespread, that it has led to an increased value for old materials, such as old oak and tiles, and consequently many nice old buildings are dismantled for the sake of their materials, etc.

(That is exactly what has been done in the case of the histori- cally valuable buildings at Port Arthur (Tas.) . This action will, without doubt, be the cause of heart-burnings in Tasmania in years to come, and will bring down "blessings"—or something else—on the heads of the short-sighted politicians who were responsible for such vandalism. It was also without question, that the proceeding was an exceedingly bad business proposition, for the value of the old buildings of that settlement, in conse- quence of the history and romance associated with :,hem could hardly be calculated : Tasmania has been destroying an asset of priceless value by the action of its politicians in this respect.

—(Ed.)

82

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Wong the 13ge-1patbs. 83

The "Tite" Prize Competition of the R.I.B.A.-The fact that a Certificate of Hon. Mention was gained by Mr. J. F. D.

Scarborough (A.) in this Competition, has not been previously mentioned in this Journal. Mr. Scarborough is congratulated upon his success.

Lectures on Architecture.—During the last few weeks, the editor has delivered two lectures on Architectural subjects. One of these was given before the Students of Architecture at the Gordon Institute of Technology, Geelong, the subject having been "Some of the Architectural Monuments of Sydney" ; the other was before the Members of the Melbourne University Atelier of Architecture and dealt with "The Architecture of Brisbane." Both lectures were illustrated with lantern slides prepared by the lecturer from his negatives of the various subjects.

Exhibition of Architectural Drawings.—An Exhibition of Drawings, the work of Students of the Architectural Associa- tion, London, and of Students of the University Architectural Diploma Course and University Architectural Atelier was opened on Monday, August 2nd, at the Melbourne Art Centre,

Old Gaol Building, Victoria Street. The Exhibition will also be open from 7.30 p.m. until 10 p.m. during the evening of that day and for two weeks following from 2 o'clock until 5 o'clock.

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Library Digitised Collections

Author/s:

Royal Victorian Institute of Architects Title:

Journal of the Royal Victorian Institute of Architects: 1926-1927 Date:

1926-1927 Persistent Link:

http://hdl.handle.net/11343/108578

References

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