• No results found

PDF Queensland Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Framework (QCAR)

N/A
N/A
Protected

Academic year: 2023

Share "PDF Queensland Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Framework (QCAR)"

Copied!
22
0
0

Loading.... (view fulltext now)

Full text

(1)
(2)

Published by:

Strategic Policy and Education Futures Department of Education and the Arts 30 Mary Street

Brisbane Q 4001 ISBN: 0 7345 1977 X ID No: 050051

cT h e State of Queensland (Department of Education and the Arts) 2005 Copyright protects this publication. Except for purposes permitted by the Copyright Act, reproduction by whatever means is prohibited without prior written permission from the publisher. Requests and inquiries concerning reproduction and rights should be addressed lo the Director, Legal Services Branch.

Department of Education and the Arts, PO Box 15033, City East, QLD, 4002.

(3)

Foreword

Education continues to be a key driver of the Queensland Government's Smart State Strategy.

A $127 million education and training package unveiled as part of the Smart State Strategy 2005-2015, will boost learning for gifted students, equip teachers with the latest technology, set statewide standards for student achievement, and provide parents with more information on their child's progress.

Students will be better equipped for the future and their parents better informed.

At the core of the new package is Smarter Learning: The Queensland Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Framework, which will set standards and help parents understand what their children know, what they can do, and how well they can do it. It will define the essential learnings to be taught from the Preparatory Year to Year 10, introduce assessment against standards in the early and middle years, and provide easy-to-read reports for parents.

Work of a similar standard will receive the same results whether students are educated in the city or the bush, by the public or the private systems.

Parents will see whether their children's performance is above, below or on par with expectations.

This is an innovative and exciting initiative with the potential to bring far-reaching and long-lasting improvements to education in Queensland. It is an ambitious and complex piece of work arising from the collaborative efforts of leading academics, expert practitioners, and the Catholic, independent and state schooling sectors.

I extend my sincere thanks and appreciation to those involved and,am pleased to release this paper, which describes the actions government will take to strengthen the links across curriculum, assessment and reporting in Queensland schools.

Central to its success will be the continued collaboration of the state and non-state education sectors and the professional expertise of Queensland teachers working together with the Queensland Studies Authority.

This is an exciting time for education in Queensland and these reforms will assert Queensland's position as a leader in education.

Minister for Education and Minister for the Arts

(4)

Contents

Foreword i Introduction 1 What is the Queensland Curriculum, Assessment

and Reporting Framework? 2 Why the new framework? 3 Building on current reforms 4

Education and Training Reforms for the Future 4

Schools Reporting 4 Queensland Certificate of Education 4

Smarter Learning: Queensland Curriculum,

Assessment and Reporting Framework 4

Developing the framework 5

Curriculum 5 Action 1: All Queensland school students learning the essentials 5

Action 2: Setting new standards to measure student achievement 6

Assessment 7 Action 3: Supporting teachers' everyday assessment practices 7

Action 4: Statewide assessment in Years 4, 6 and 9 8

Reporting 10 Action 5: Meaningful reports of student achievement 10

Making it happen 12 Action 6: Managing the project 12

Action 7: Evaluating outcomes 13

Tlie way forward 14 A step-by-step approach to change 14

When will changes happen in schools? 14

Bibliography 15 Links to additional resources 15

Appendix 16

(5)

Introduction

The world is changing rapidly. Queenslanders need to be highly skilled and educated to excel among their competitors overseas, and their skills need to be updated continually to keep pace.

Students need to have the knowledge, skills, attributes and values to contribute to the social, economic and cultural life of the community.

They must be able to meet the challenges of an increasingly competitive world and become lifelong learners.

The Queensland Government has been rebuilding and improving the state's education and training system to meet these needs since it launched its Education and Training Reforms for the Future in 2002. The Smarter Learning: Queensland Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Framework is a key component of Stage 2 of the Smart State Strategy announced in April 2005.

The Queensland Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Framework will set standards and help parents understand what their children know and can do, and how well they can do it. It will define the essential learnings to be taught from the Preparatory Year to Year 10 (P-10), support teachers' everyday assessment practices, introduce statewide assessments in the middle years, and provide easy-to-read reports for parents.

The framework is being developed by Queensland's education leaders — the Department of Education and the Arts, Queensland Catholic Education Commission, Association of Independent Schools of Queensland,

Education Queensland, and Queensland Studies Authority.

In addition, leading academics and expert practitioners have provided advice on the intellectual rigour of the work, particularly on theoretical and technical issues.

More information on technical issues is provided in an expert paper Background, rationale and specifications: Queensland Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Framework prepared by Professor Peter Freebody from The University of Queensland. To access this document visit the Department of Education and the Arts website:

www.education.qld.gov.au/qcar/

r

i

(6)

What is the Queensland Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Framework?

The framework presents the strategies to define essential learnings and set new standards for assessing and reporting student achievement in the early and middle years of schooling in Queensland.

It will improve student learning and increase comparability of assessment and reporting across all Queensland schools from P-10.

The framework will:

• make clear statements about the essential learnings that must be taught in Queensland schools

• provide a common frame of reference and a shared language for communicating student achievement

• equip teachers with high-quality assessment tools for collecting evidence of student achievement

• promote teachers' professional learning, focused on good assessment practices and judging the quality of student achievement against statewide standards

• introduce statewide assessment of student learning in Years 4, 6 and 9

• provide more meaningful reports of student achievement.

The framework will help schools deliver more cohesive learning programs and help students achieve deeper levels of understanding. Intellectually challenging and rich real-world learning experiences will help students become lifelong learners.

There will be greater consistency across classrooms and greater continuity across year levels in what is taught and how it is assessed and reported in Queensland schools - a significant step forward for the 25 per cent of students and the large number of teachers who change schools each year.

The framework will support teachers and teaching that is tailored to meet the unique needs of students. The framework will not add to teacher workload or dictate how to teach. It will provide valuable resources to support teachers in their everyday work.

Rather than seeking 'sameness', the framework promotes greater comparability across Queensland schools. It presents a way of achieving more commonality in what is taught while supporting diversity in how it is taught. The framework takes into account the distinctive needs of students and school communities across Queensland.

(7)

Why the new framework?

The Queensland Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Framework addresses concerns raised by teachers and the community about the amount of material required to be covered in the early and middle years curriculum, which is hindering in-depth learning.

Concerns have also been raised about a lack of clarity around what must be taught across schools and what standards of student achievement are expected.

The framework will focus the P-10 curriculum on essential learnings and the measurement of student achievement against agreed standards.

AH students, from the city to the bush, will be taught the essential learnings and assessed against the same standards to increase the

consistency of teacher judgments of student achievement across the state.

Teachers will have access to new high-quality assessment tools to support their everyday classroom assessment practices.

New statewide assessment will be introduced to measure student achievement in the essential learnings against standards at key points in the middle years.

Parents will be able to see much more easily how well their child is achieving and what is expected. At present it can be difficult for parents to understand their child's level of achievement, when to seek extra support, and how they can help their child.

(8)

Building on current reforms

Recent changes to schools reporting in Queensland mean:

• parents receive a student report at least twice a year

• every school offers parent-teacher interviews each semester

• reports for Years 3, 5 and 7 literacy and numeracy tests show how students achieve in comparison to state averages and national benchmarks

• every school publishes information about the school and its outcomes, and from 2006 every school will publish this information on its school website

• from 2006, summary information will be released on each school that has students in Year 12

• Year 12 graduates participate in an annual statewide Next Step survey of their employment, study and life choices in the year following their graduation.

Queensland is a leader in educational reform. The Queensland Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Framework builds on several initiatives implemented across all schools in recent years, including the Education and Training Reforms for the Future, Schools Reporting, and the Queensland Certificate of Education.

Education and Training Reforms for the Future

Through the Education and Training Reforms for the Future initiatives, the Queensland Government has taken action to:

• provide a solid foundation for early education through the

introduction of a universally available non-compulsory Preparatory Year from 2007

• improve engagement and achievement in the middle years of learning

• establish new Teaming or earning' laws that require young people to be in learning, training or work until they achieve a Senior Certificate, a Certificate III or turn 17.

Schools Reporting

Recent changes to schools reporting guarantee better-quality and more frequent information about school performance and student achievement, including at least two student reports per year and parent-teacher meetings each semester.

Queensland Certificate of Education

The Queensland Certificate of Education is the new senior schooling qualification. It will replace the Senior Certificate in 2008, with students in Year 9 in 2005 the first to receive it. The Queensland Certificate of Education raises the bar by setting a new Queensland standard for learning. For the first time, students will be required to achieve a significant amount of learning at a set standard and to demonstrate minimum standards of literacy and numeracy.

The new qualification will recognise a broad range of student achievements, including TAFE courses, school-based apprenticeships, university subjects, job readiness programs, and structured work experience.

Smarter Learning: Queensland Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Framework

The new framework for P-10 will support successful transitions and ongoing progress in students' learning across the early, middle and senior years.

It complements the government's reforms in senior schooling to equip all students with the essential knowledge, skills and attributes for life and work.

Tt builds on earlier changes to schools reporting by ensuring that reporting of student achievement is reliable and comparable across schools.

(9)

Developing the framework

Curriculum

Curriculum refers to everything a school does to support student learning including what is taught, and the knowledge and skills acquired by students. Across Queensland, each school develops its own curriculum plan which gives details of the what, when and how of the teaching- learning process of a particular school across the different years and phases of schooling.

Action 1: All Queensland school students learning the essentials

WHY IDENTIFY ESSENTIAL LEARNINGS?

Regardless of the school attended, all young Queenslanders need essential knowledge, skills, and attributes to enjoy life and contribute to society.

While it is impossible for students to learn everything, they must be prepared to meet the challenges of the future. The new framework will define what is essential for all students in Years P-10 to have the opportunity to learn.

Parents can be confident that the learning experience at every

Queensland school provides opportunities for all students to acquire the essential learnings for life, now and in the future.

WHAT ARE THE ESSENTIAL LEARNINGS?

The essential learnings will describe what students are expected to know and to do at key points along the P-10 learning continuum.

The essential learnings will encompass knowledge, skills and attributes that are:

• specific to content areas such as English, maths, and science

• required for complex, real-life challenges such as higher-order thinking skills, and social and personal competence

• needed for good communication and ongoing learning such as literacy, numeracy, life skills, information and communication technologies, and cultural skills.

All schools will build their curriculum around the essential learnings and help students master them.

The essential learnings will not make up the whole" curriculum offered by schools. Schools will retain the flexibility to work with their local community and respond to diverse student backgrounds, knowledge, skills and needs. A school's learning program will continue to reflect the values of its community.

Schools will continue to organise their curriculum in various ways - grouped around Key Learning Areas (KLAs) or subject areas or topics.

The introduction of essential learnings will not require schools to change their curriculum frameworks to the KLA syllabuses.

F o r t e a c h e r s , the essential learnings will mean:

• clear and practical statements about what must be taught in Queensland schools

• continued flexibility to tailor teaching to the particular needs of students

• a coherent focus for their work.

(10)

Standards for essential learnings YrlO

What students know and can

do Describing the progression of learning at key

milestones and/or year

levels

How well they know and can

do it Describing differences in

the qualities of students' achievement

HOW WILLTHE ESSENTIAL LEARNINGS BE IDENTIFIED?

A range of materials and experts will be used to identify the essential learnings.

Queensland's eight KLA syllabuses will be the primary information source for the essential learnings related to specific content areas.

The eight KLAs are The Arts, English, Health and Physical Education, Languages other than English, Mathematics, Science, Studies of Society and Environment, and Technology.

A range of curriculum materials will be used to identify those aspects of the essential learnings related to more generic and cross-curriculum skills needed for complex, real-life challenges, good communication and ongoing learning.

Action 2: Setting new standards to measure student achievement

WHY HAVE STANDARDS?

Within the Queensland Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting

Framework, standards will provide the unifying device for connecting the essential learnings to assessment and reporting practices.

For teachers, parents and students, standards will mean a common reference point, and a shared language for describing what is expected of students and the quality of student achievement at key points along the P-10 learning continuum. .

WHATARE STANDARDS?

Standards are descriptors of student achievement used to monitor growth in student learning and provide information about the quality of student achievement.

In the new framework, standards will be used to describe the progress and quality of student achievement in the essential learnings.

With the standards as the reference point, teachers will be better able to judge whether a student's progress in the essential learnings is above,

below or on par with expectations.

A common understanding of standards is needed so that they can be applied consistently across students, classrooms and schools.

Specific descriptions as well as examples of student work with

accompanying teachers' comments will be used to illustrate the meaning of each standard.

Over time, teachers will develop common interpretations of the standards by working together and sharing how they apply these standards.

HOW WILL STANDARDS BE DEVELOPED?

The Queensland Studies Authority will develop standards in collaboration with the expert help of teachers and other education professionals, as well as through analyses of student work.

(11)

A range of current curriculum materials will be analysed to identify the sequence in which the knowledge, skills and attributes of the essential learnings typically develop.

This sequence will then be tested against samples of student work and further refined.

Assessment

Assessment refers to the collection of information about student achievement. The framework recognises the central role of teachers' everyday classroom assessment in providing authentic and valid feedback for ongoing improvement in teaching and student learning. It also recognises that statewide point-in-time assessment provides reliable and comparable information about student achievement across schools.

While each assessment approach provides different information, together they provide a fuller picture of student achievement.

Through the Queensland Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Framework, strategies will be put in place to support teachers' everyday assessment practices and to collect statewide comparable data on student achievement in Years 4, 6 and 9.

Action 3: Supporting teachers' everyday assessment practices

WHY HAVE AN ASSESSMENT BANK?

A central assessment bank will be a valuable resource to support teachers in their everyday assessment practices.

Teachers will have access to a range of high-quality assessment tools for use across P-10, that are linked to the essential learnings and standards.

They will be able to use resources from the central bank that meet their needs.

The assessment bank will complement school-based assessment practices currently used in Queensland schools.

All teachers will continue to use their own assessment strategies for collecting evidence of student achievement across the full learning program.

WHAT IS AN ASSESSMENT BANK?

An assessment bank is a collection of high-quality assessment tools that are standards-referenced against the essential learnings that teachers can access as needed.

The bank will include a variety of assessment tools requiring a variety of student responses such as short-answer and extended responses, or more practical, performance-based responses and oral responses. Every Queensland teacher will be able to access this bank.

Every assessment tool in the bank will be accompanied by:

• links to teaching and learning

• an administration guide

• a marking guide

• samples of student work illustrating what is expected for each

F o r t e a c h e r s , the assessment bank means:

• access to high-quality

assessment tools for collecting valid and reliable evidence of student achievement

• models of good assessment practice to draw on in creating their own assessment tools

• resources to support consistency of teacher judgments about student achievement

• support to enhance assessment knowledge and skills.

(12)

WhyYears4,6and9?

• provides a focus on the continuity of learning in the middle years

• comparable assessment is already evident in the early and senior years

• allows for comparison with Years 3, 5 and 7* statewide tests of basic literacy and numeracy skills.

•A Year 9 test of basic skills will be introduced in 2007.

The samples of student work will illustrate the features required to reach the defined standards for a particular assessment activity. Teachers may also use these student work samples with their own students to analyse together what makes up a high-quality performance.

Together with marking guides, these samples of student work will support teachers in making warranted and reliable judgments about the standard of student achievement.

These materials will provide the basis for discussions among teachers about the expectations of the assessment activity and the quality of actual student achievement.

Mechanisms are already in place in many Queensland schools to support teachers to meet and compare each other's judgments of student achievement. The Queensland Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Framework will provide a common language for these discussions to help teachers achieve greater consistency in their judgments.

Action 4: Statewide assessment in Years 4,6 and 9

WHY HAVE COMPARABLE ASSESSMENT?

With rigorous comparable assessment, student achievements of a similar standard are recognised as equivalent, irrespective of the school attended.

For parents and students, this means:

• comparable results are assigned to student achievement across schools

• increased confidence in the reliability of reported results

• more information about whether a student's progress is above, below or on par with expectations.

Student achievement on the new point-in-time assessment can be compared with their achievement in ongoing school-based assessment, and statewide tests of numeracy and literacy which occur in Years 3, 5 and 7.

Statewide information about student achievement collected in Years 4, 6 and 9 will support school and system-level planning.

WHAT WILL STATEWIDE COMPARABLE ASSESSMENT INVOLVE?

As part of the Queensland Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Framework, new statewide assessment will be introduced in Years 4, 6 and 9 to measure student achievement in the essential learnings.

This assessment will build on teachers' classroom assessment practices in these years.

The new statewide assessment will gauge students' breadth of knowledge and depth of understanding in the essential learnings, with a focus on English, maths and science. In addition to these core areas of assessment, one other area of the essential learnings will be covered at each

assessment point.

(13)

HOW WILL STATEWIDE ASSESSMENT BE DEVELOPED?

A quality assurance process, driven by the Queensland Studies Authority, will be used to ensure high-quality evidence of student achievement is collected, and that reported teacher judgments of student achievement are justified, comparable across schools, and based on a shared understanding of standards.

The assessment tasks

In collaboration with representatives of the Catholic, independent, and state education sectors, the Queensland Studies Authority will develop common statewide assessment tasks to be administered annually, at a set time for Years 4, 6 and 9.

The common statewide assessment tasks will involve authentic and complex tasks that allow students to demonstrate their breadth and depth of understanding in the essential learnings. Students will complete these tasks under common conditions such as using the same kinds of equipment, working alone or in groups, or having a choice of written or oral presentations.

As much as possible, the common assessment tasks will avoid the flavour of point-in-time tests. The intention is to allow students to demonstrate their best work.

State schools will use the common statewide assessment tasks in Years 4, 6 and 9 to collect evidence of student achievement. Non-state schools may also use these common tasks. Alternatively, a non-state school or cluster of non-state schools may use locally devised tasks in Years 4, 6 and 9, which meet quality assessment criteria developed and monitored by the Queensland Studies Authority.

Maximising consistency of teacher judgments

A number of strategies will be used to maximise the comparability of teacher judgments of student achievement.

Administration and marking guides will accompany every assessment task. In addition, for the common statewide tasks there will be reporting guides for sharing results with parents as well as examples of student work. These examples will illustrate the distinguishing features of student achievement required for each available result.

Teachers from within and across schools will be able to compare each other's judgments of student achievement on the new statewide assessment. The Queensland Studies Authority will develop processes for validating teacher judgments on this statewide assessment.

Many teachers win derive

professional benefits from

accessing models of well-designed assessment tasks, and through their experiences in evaluating and marking these tasks.

(14)

Principles to guide school reporting practices in Queensland

1. School reporting is part of a cooperative relationship between school staff, parents, students and the community, which involves mutual responsibility, respect and trust.

2. All students and parents are entitled to confidential formal and informal school reporting that is responsive to individual needs and used to plan future learning.

3. School reporting acknowledges student achievement over the reporting period.

A. School reporting identifies students' strengths and areas for improvement across a broad range of indicators, including curricular, other activities and social development within the school context.

5. All parents should have the opportunity to be involved in the development, implementation and review of reporting practices at their school.

6. All parents should receive regular and clear reports on their child's progress and have opportunities to discuss their child's progress with teachers, from early in the school year.

7. Each school community should have access to regular and easy- to-understand reporting on its school's performance against its mission, goals and education programs.

8. School communities have access to information about school performance that uses clear, broad, agreed-upon indicators that avoid superficial comparisons of schools or sectors.

Reporting

Reporting is about communicating information on the results of

assessment of student achievement to a range of audiences in a range of styles for a range of puqwses. What is reported and how it is reported vary according to the audience.

Action 5: Meaningful reports of student achievement

WHY REPORT ON STUDENT ACHIEVEMENTS?

Students need feedback on their learning. Reports provide a summary of student progress and achievement at the end of each semester or unit of work. These reports complement feedback received during the learning experience, such as detailed verbal or written comments, annotations on their work and face-to-face discussions.

Parents want reliable, regular and easy-to-read reports. They want to know whether their child is achieving above, below, or on par with expectations so they can help support and plan for their child's future learning.

While the primary purpose of assessment and reporting is to improve student learning, there are other valid purposes for assessment and reporting.

Teachers and schools need data about student achievement to plan further learning experiences and monitor the impact of school improvement strategies.

School authorities need data about whole groups of students to inform system-level planning. Statewide data on student achievement can be used to identify priorities for resourcing and professional development as well as for accountability to the community for the use of public funds.

Through implementation of the Queensland Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Framework, teachers will collect evidence of student achievement that can be used for multiple reporting purposes.

j

(15)

WHATWILL BE REPORTED REGULARLY TO PARENTS?

Every year, schools provide parents with two reports about their child's achievements based on the results of teachers' everyday classroom assessment practices. These reports will be enhanced through the introduction of a common reporting framework.

The reporting framework will identify those elements that need to appear in every student report. The common elements may include descriptions of what has been taught, the expected standards of student achievement, and how well the child has achieved compared with these standards.

The twice-yearly reports will include a common 5-point results scale for describing student achievement across all areas of learning between the Preparatory Year and Year 10.

A common 5-point results scale is already used for the senior years in Queensland. It ranges from Very High Achievement (VHA) to Very Low Achievement (VLA) with the mid-point representing Sound Achievement (SA).

Opinions about the most appropriate scale to use in the early and middle years of schooling will be sought. Options include the senior years scale (VHA-VLA), letters (such as A to E), numbers (such as 1 to 5), or words (such as Excellent to Unsatisfactory).

Teachers will continue to make on-balance judgments based on a collection of information about student achievement.

Work on the reporting framework will progress when advances have been made in defining the essential learnings, setting standards and creating assessment tasks.

For a detailed picture of the new assessment and reporting arrangements that will apply for each year of schooling in Queensland, see the Appendix.

REPORTING TO PARENTS ON STATEWIDE ASSESSMENTS Statewide assessment of the essential learnings in Years 4, 6 and 9

Student results on the statewide assessment conducted in Years 4, 6 and 9 will be included in the twice-yearly reports provided by Queensland schools. This means that from 2008, all student reports provided by schools in Years 4, 6 and 9 will include more information about student achievement in the essential learnings than is available at other years.

Student achievement on the statewide assessment tasks will be described using the common 5-point results scale referred to above. Parents will see how well their child achieved on the assessment and how their child's achievement compares with what is expected for their year level.

Statewide tests of basic skills in Years 3, 5 and 7

As is currently the case, parents of students in Years 3, 5 and 7 will continue to receive a report from the Queensland Studies Authority as well as the two reports provided by the School. The reports from the Queensland Studies Authority show the student's results from statewide tests of literacy and numeracy compared with the state average results for students in that year level.

A common reporting framework may include:

Areas of learning

Outlines the areas of learning the student has covered in the reporting period such as subjects, key learning areas, rich tasks, and vocational education programs.

Standards

Describes the standards of student achievement expected within each area of learning.

Results

Records how well the student achieved in each area of learning in the reporting period using a common 5-point results scale.

Statewide assessments in Years 4, 6 and 9

Describes the areas of essential learnings assessed and the standards of student achievement expected in each assessment task.

Records how well the student achieved on each statewide assessment task using a 5-point results scale.

(16)

These reports also show how the student achieved compared with the national benchmarks for Reading, Writing and Numeracy. The national benchmarks are the nationally agreed minimum results expected for students at each of these year levels. Benchmarks represent the minimum acceptable standard without which a student will have difficulty making progress at school.

REPORTING TO THE COMMUNITY

The Queensland Studies Authority will collate the data from the statewide assessment of student achievement in Years 4, 6 and 9, and provide summary reports to education sectors and the community on how well Queensland students are achieving and schools are performing.

Making it happen

Action 6: Managing the project

The Queensland Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Framework is a significant initiative endorsed by the state and non-state education authorities as having the potential to create real improvement in Queensland schooling. It is an ambitious project and considerable commitment and effort are needed to develop and implement it.

For that reason, the Queensland Government has taken steps to ensure its success.

HOW WILL THE PROJECT BE MANAGED?

A Queensland Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Board will be established to oversee the initiative.

The board will be chaired by the Director-General, Department of Education and the Arts, and include senior representatives of the Queensland Catholic Education Commission, Association of Independent Schools of Queensland, Education Queensland, Queensland Studies Authority, Department of the Premier and Cabinet, and Queensland Treasury.

The Queensland Studies Authority will develop each of the elements of the framework for use in Queensland schools.

The Governing Body of the Queensland Studies Authority will represent the key consultative body to ensure stakeholder input into each element of the framework. The Governing Body of the Queensland Studies Authority includes representatives from a broad range of key groups including teachers, principals, parent groups, employers, unions, vocational education and training, and those representing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, special needs, rural and remote, and higher education groups.

Teachers are the driving force for delivering the intended outcomes of the Queensland Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Framework. The Queensland Studies Authority will ensure that the experience of skilled teachers shapes the development of each element of the new framework.

(17)

Action 7: Evaluating outcomes

The Queensland Government is committed to basing its decisions on research and evaluating whether reforms are working as intended. An evaluation strategy will be in place from the start, so that the impact of the framework on student learning and teaching practice can be determined.

The evaluation will monitor the effect of the framework across Queensland schools. In addition, it will allow for comparison with interstate and overseas schools to show how well Queensland schools are performing relative to other education systems.

Such data will inform education policy and ongoing actions to ensure that Queensland schooling is flexible and responsive to changing needs, and provides the very best education possible.

(18)

The way forward

A step-by-step approach to change

Real, sustained and substantive changes to teacher practice require time and support. A gradual approach is needed to steadily deepen teacher knowledge and understanding of curriculum, assessment and reporting in the context of teaching and learning.

It is recognised that Queensland teachers and schools have only recently had access to the full suite of KLA syllabuses. This has impacted on the ability of schools and education sectors to align curriculum, assessment and reporting practices.

The framework also builds on the considerable work that has been done within each education sector to help schools and teachers implement the KLA syllabuses.

The government also recognises the demands being made on staff, schools and sectors as Queensland's education and training system is reformed.

The changes envisaged through the Queensland Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Framework need to be viewed as part of an evolutionary approach that gradually builds on the strengths of Queensland teachers and the current KLA syllabuses.

When will changes happen in schools?

As new resources are developed to support the elements of the

framework, they will be made available to schools. From as early as 2006, some schools will be involved in trials of essential learnings, standards, and the bank of assessment tools.

In addition, schools will be able to trial the first common statewide assessment tasks in late 2006, with more tasks being trialled in 2007. By 2008, all elements of the framework will be ready for use in Queensland schools.

Each element of the framework will be supported by new resources to assist with professional development. In addition, each education sector will continue to support its teachers by tailoring professional development opportunities to their needs.

Much needs to be done in developing each of the elements of the framework. The Queensland Studies Authority will progress this work in collaboration with key education stakeholders.

(19)

Bibliography

Ainley,). (2004). Evaluation report of the New Basics Research Program. Brisbane:

Department of Education and the Arts.

Assessment and Reporting Taskforce (2002). The report of the Assessment and Reporting Taskforce. Brisbane: Education Queensland.

Black, P., & William, D. (1998). Inside the black box: Raising standards through classroom assessments, Phi Delta Kappan, 80(2), 139-148.

Darling-Hammond, L. (February, 2003). Standards and assessments: Where we are and what we need. Teachers College Record, 105 from www.tcrecord.org/Content.

asp?Content!D=11109

Department of Education and the Arts (2004). New Basics research report. Brisbane:

Author.

Freebody, P. (2005). Background, rationale and specifications: Queensland Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Framework. Brisbane: Department of Education and the Arts.

Linn, R.L., Baker, E.L., & Dunbar, S.B., (1991). Complex performance-based

assessment: Expectation and validation criteria. Educational Researcher, 20(8), 15-21.

Luke, A. et al., (2003). Beyond the middle: A report about literacy and numeracy development of target group students in the middle years of schooling, Vol. 1.

Brisbane: Commonwealth Department of Education, Science and Training.

PelligrinoJ.W., Chudowsky, N., & Glaser, R. (Eds), (2001). Knowing what students know: The science and design of educational assessment. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Popham, W. James, (2003). The seductive allure of data. Educational Leadership, 60(5), 48-51.

Roulston, J. (Ed.). (2005). Year 12 national assessment: Accountability or improved academic outcomes. AISQ Briefing, 9(1), 1-3.

Sheldon, K.M., & Biddle, B.J. (1998). Standards, accountability and school reform:

Perils and pitfalls. Teachers College Record, 100(1), 164-180.

University of Queensland, (2001). The Queensland School Reform Longitudinal Study.

Brisbane: Education Queensland.

Wiggins, G.P. (1993). Assessing student performance: Exploring the purpose and limits of testing. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Links to additional resources

Education and Training Reforms for the Future: www.education.qld.gov.au/etrf/

Schools Reporting: www.education.qld.gov.au/schools/reporting/index.html Queensland Certificate of Education: www.qsa.qld.edu.au/etrf/qce/index.html Smart Queensland: Smart State Strategy 2005-2015: www.smartstate.qld.gov.au Smarter Learning: The Queensland Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Framework:

www.education.qld.gov.au/qcar/

Background, rationale and specifications: Queensland Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Framework. (Expert paper): www.education.qld.gov.au/qcar/

(20)

Appendix

Assessment and reporting arrangements for Queensland schools with the introduction of the Queensland Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Framework

Year Assessment Schools Reporting

Each year School-devised assessment.

Access to a bank of assessment tools to complement school-devised assessment in Years P-10.

All Schools use a common framework for student reports with a 5-point results scale for reporting student achievement. Reports provided twice a year.

Prep* Children's learning progress is monitored using the Early Learning and Development Framework (ELADF).

All state schools and most non- state schools.

At the end of Prep, parents receive a report on their child's progress, based on the ELADF.

Prep-3 The Year 2 Diagnostic Net is a standardised tool used to map children's development in literacy and numeracy.

All state schools and most non- state schools.

In Years 1, 2 and 3, schools provide a standard report about each student's development in reading, writing and numeracy.

The summary results ofYear 2 students are also reported to Queensland Parliament.

3 All students in Year 3 participate in national tests of literacy and numeracy skills.

All The Queensland Studies Authority provides a report to parents that shows the individual's achievement in comparison to national benchmarks and state averages.

School-level data reported annually to the community.

Summary results are also reported to Queensland Parliament and in national reports.

All students in Year 4 participate in comparable assessment of the essential learnings.

All Schools report to parents using a 5-point results scale.

Summary results reported to schools, education authorities, and Queensland Parliament.

5 All students in Year 5 participate in national tests of literacy and numeracy skills.

All The Queensland Studies Authority provides a report to parents that shows the individual's achievement in comparison to national benchmarks and state averages.

School-level data reported annually to the community.

Summary results also reported to Queensland Parliament and in national reports.

6 All students in Year 6 participate in comparable assessment of the essential learnings.

Every yeara sample ofYear6 Queensland students participates in a national test on either English, Maths, Science, Civics and Citizenship or Information and Communication Technologies (one subject area covered each year).

All

A sample of students is drawn from all schools.

Schools report to parents using a 5-point results scale.

Summary results reported to schools, education authorities, and Queensland Parliament.

Summary results are reported in state and national reports. Parents do not receive reports about individual student achievements.

7 All students in Year 7 participate in national tests of literacy and numeracy skills.

All The Queensland Studies Authority provides a report to parents that shows the individual's achievement in comparison to national benchmarks and state averages.

School-level data reported annually to the community.

Summary results also reported to Queensland Parliament and in national reports.

(21)

Year Assessment Schools Reporting 9 All students in Year 9 participate in comparable

assessment of the essential learnings.

All students in Year 9 participate in national tests of literacy and numeracy skills from 2007'.

All Schools report to parents using a 5-point results scale.

Summary results reported to schools, education authorities, and Queensland Parliament.

The Queensland Studies Authority provides a report to parents that shows the individual's achievement in comparison to national benchmarks and state averages.

School-level data reported annually to the community.

Summary results also reported to Queensland Parliament and in national reports.

10 Every year a sample ofYear 10 Queensland students participates in a national test on rotating topics — to date, Science (2003), Civics and Citizenship (2004) or Information and Communication Technologies (2005).

Every three years, a sample of Queensland students (aged 15 years) participates in international tests covering Reading, Mathematical Literacy and Scientific Literacy.

A sample of students is drawn from all schools.

Summary results are reported in state and national reports. Parents do not receive reports about individual student achievements.

Summary results are reported in state, national and international reports. Parents do not receive reports about individual student achievements.

11-12 Moderated school-based assessment and the Queensland Core Skills Test.

All The Queensland Studies Authority issues a Senior Certificate to eligible students completing Year 12, which records results in senior subjects, vocational education and training and other recognised learning.

The Certificate also records a result for those students who sit the Queensland Core Skills Test.

Tertiary Entrance Statements are issued to eligible students.

The Certificate of Post-compulsory School Education (CPCSE) reports the results of students who are on highly individualised learning programs.

School-level data reported annually to the community.

Queensland Certificate of Education issued from 2008.

Annual statewide publication of Year 12 data by school from 2006.

Annual survey of study, employment and other destinations ofYear 12 students in theyearafter leaving school.

* Prep refers to the Preparatory Year

1 New Commonwealth funding requirements include a Year 9 test in 2007

(22)

Library Digitised Collections

Author/s:

Queensland. Department of Education and the Arts Title:

Queensland Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Framework (QCAR) Date:

2005

Persistent Link:

http://hdl.handle.net/11343/115659

References

Related documents

Library Digitised Collections Author/s: Fraser, Malcolm Title: Army craft for Queensland flood relief Date: c1967 Persistent Link: http://hdl.handle.net/11343/40198 Terms and