• No results found

1 A simple method for the small scale synthesis and solid

N/A
N/A
Protected

Academic year: 2023

Share "1 A simple method for the small scale synthesis and solid"

Copied!
22
0
0

Loading.... (view fulltext now)

Full text

(1)

A  simple  method  for  the  small  scale  synthesis  and  solid-­‐phase  extraction  purification  of   steroid  sulfates  

Christopher  C.  Waller,  Malcolm  D.  McLeod*  

Research  School  of  Chemistry,  Australian  National  University,  Canberra  ACT  0200,  Australia    

*Corresponding  Author  

Associate  Professor  Malcolm  D.  McLeod  

Research  School  of  Chemistry,  Australian  National  University,  Canberra  ACT  0200,  Australia   Tel.:  +612  6125  3504;  Fax.:  +612  6125  8114;  E-­‐mail:  [email protected]  

   

(2)

Abstract  

Steroid  sulfates  are  a  major  class  of  steroid  metabolite  that  are  of  growing  importance  in   fields  such  as  anti-­‐doping  analysis,  the  detection  of  residues  in  agricultural  produce  or   medicine.  Despite  this,  many  steroid  sulfate  reference  materials  may  have  limited  or  no   availability  hampering  the  development  of  analytical  methods.  We  report  simple  protocols   for  the  rapid  synthesis  and  purification  of  steroid  sulfates  that  are  suitable  for  adoption  by   analytical  laboratories.  Central  to  this  approach  is  the  use  of  solid-­‐phase  extraction  (SPE)  for   purification,  a  technique  routinely  used  for  sample  preparation  in  analytical  laboratories   around  the  world.  The  sulfate  conjugates  of  sixteen  steroid  compounds  encompassing  a   wide  range  of  steroid  substitution  patterns  and  configurations  are  prepared,  including  the   previously  unreported  sulfate  conjugates  of  the  designer  steroids  furazadrol  (17β-­‐

hydroxyandrostan-­‐[2,3-­‐d]isoxazole),  isofurazadrol  (17β-­‐hydroxyandrostan[3,2-­‐c]isoxazole)   and  trenazone  (17β-­‐hydroxyestra-­‐4,9-­‐dien-­‐3-­‐one).  Structural  characterisation  data,  together   with  NMR  and  mass  spectra  are  reported  for  all  steroid  sulfates,  often  for  the  first  time.  The   scope  of  this  approach  for  small  scale  synthesis  is  highlighted  by  the  sulfation  of  one  

microgram  of  testosterone  (17β-­‐hydroxyandrost-­‐4-­‐en-­‐3-­‐one)  as  monitored  by  liquid   chromatography-­‐mass  spectrometry  (LCMS).  

 

Keywords  

Steroid,  Sulfate  ester,  Steroid  sulfate,  Sulfation,  Solid-­‐phase  extraction,  Anti-­‐doping  

   

(3)

1.  Introduction  

Steroid  sulfates  are  a  major  class  of  phase  II  steroid  metabolite  that  are  of  growing  

importance  in  fields  such  as  anti-­‐doping  analysis  [1],  the  detection  of  residues  in  agricultural   produce  [2]  and  medicine  [3].  This  is  in  part  driven  by  improvements  in  liquid  

chromatography  mass  spectrometry  (LCMS)  technology  that  empower  the  direct  detection   of  phase  II  conjugates  [4,5]  but  also  arises  due  to  the  important  information  unveiled  by  a   thorough  analysis  of  phase  II  metabolism  [6,7].  In  the  field  of  anti-­‐doping  science  the  

analysis  of  human  sulfate  metabolites  can  afford  greater  retrospectivity  for  the  detection  of   steroidal  agents  [8–10]  and  also  serve  as  markers  to  distinguish  between  steroids  of  

exogenous  and  endogenous  origin  [11–13].  Although  there  are  a  range  of  reliable  

approaches  to  analyse  for  phase  II  metabolites  in  both  humans  and  animals,  the  range  of   available  steroidal  sulfate  reference  materials  is  incomplete  and  the  ability  to  rapidly  make   and  manipulate  steroid  sulfates  as  standards  or  reference  materials  has  limitations  [1].  This   may  mean  that  significant  steroid  sulfate  markers  cannot  be  quantified  or  even  identified   [11,13].  

A  range  of  methods  have  been  developed  to  access  steroid  sulfates  including  the  reaction  of   the  parent  steroid  with  sulfate  salts  and  acetic  anhydride  [14],  chlorosulfonic  acid  [15],   amine  complexes  of  sulfur  trioxide  [16–19],  sulfuric  acid  and  carbodiimides  [20],  sulfamic   acid  [21],  or  more  recently  by  novel  sulfuryl  imidazolium  salts  [22,23].  These  reactions   however,  whilst  effective  in  affording  the  desired  sulfate  compounds,  generally  require   significant  chemical  expertise  and  may  also  require  harsh  or  hazardous  conditions  

[15,19,20],  specialised  reagents  [22,23],  or  complicated  purification  methods.  These  factors   make  small  scale  synthesis  of  steroid  sulfates  for  analytical  purposes  a  somewhat  

challenging  undertaking.  Simple  synthetic  access  to  steroid  sulfates  would  facilitate  the   identification  of  metabolites  and  assist  in  the  development  of  methods  targeting  these   analytes.  In  this  paper  we  report  a  general  method  for  the  small  scale  synthesis  and   purification  of  steroid  sulfate  compounds  for  anti-­‐doping  research  and  other  analytical   applications  that  is  suitable  for  adoption  by  analytical  laboratories.  The  method  takes   advantage  of  a  rapid  purification  by  solid-­‐phase  extraction  (SPE),  a  technique  familiar  to   analytical  laboratories  but  with  untapped  potential  in  chemical  synthesis.    

(4)

2.  Experimental   2.1.  Materials  

Chemicals  and  solvents  including  sulfur  trioxide  pyridine  complex  (SO3.py),  sulfur  trioxide   triethylamine  complex  (SO3.NEt3)  and  1,4-­‐dioxane,  were  purchased  from  Sigma–Aldrich   (Castle  Hill,  Australia)  and  were  used  as  supplied  unless  otherwise  stated.  Androsterone  (3α-­‐

hydroxy-­‐5α-­‐androst-­‐17-­‐one),  epiandrosterone  (3β-­‐hydroxy-­‐5α-­‐androst-­‐17-­‐one),  

etiocholanolone  (3α-­‐hydroxy-­‐5β-­‐androst-­‐17-­‐one),  methandriol  (17α-­‐methylandrost-­‐5-­‐ene-­‐

3β,17β-­‐diol)  and  testosterone  (17β-­‐hydroxyandrost-­‐4-­‐en-­‐3-­‐one)  were  obtained  from   Steraloids  (Newport  RI,  USA).  Estra-­‐4,9-­‐dien-­‐3,17-­‐one  was  obtained  from  AK  Scientific   (Union  City  CA,  USA).  Dehydroepiandrosterone  (3β-­‐hydroxyandrost-­‐5-­‐en-­‐17-­‐one)  was   obtained  from  BDH  (Poole,  UK).  Lithocholic  acid  (3α-­‐Hydroxy-­‐5β-­‐cholan-­‐24-­‐oic  acid)  was   obtained  from  L.  Light  &  Co.  (Colnbrook,  UK).  Epitestosterone  (17α-­‐hydroxyandrost-­‐4-­‐en-­‐3-­‐

one)  was  synthesised  from  testosterone  using  literature  methods  [24].  MilliQ  water  was   used  in  all  aqueous  solutions  and  in  the  liquid  chromatography  mobile  phase.  Liquid   chromatography  (gradient)  grade  methanol  was  obtained  from  Merck  (Kilsyth,  Australia)   and  was  used  for  preparing  the  liquid  chromatography  mobile  phase  and  steroid  standard   solutions.  N,N-­‐Dimethylformamide  (DMF)  and  aqueous  ammonia  solution  were  obtained   from  Chem-­‐Supply  (Gillman,  Australia).  Formic  acid  was  obtained  from  Ajax  Chemicals   (Auburn,  Australia).  Ethyl  formate  and  methanol  were  distilled  separately  from  calcium   hydride  under  a  nitrogen  atmosphere  before  use.  Chlorosulfonic  acid  [CAUTION!]  was   distilled  under  a  nitrogen  atmosphere  before  use.  Tetrahydrofuran  was  distilled  from   sodium  wire  before  use.  Solid-­‐phase  extraction  (SPE)  was  performed  using  Waters   (Rydalmere,  Australia)  Oasis  weak  anion  exchange  (WAX)  6cc  cartridges  (186004647).  

2.2.  Instruments  

Melting  points  were  determined  using  a  SRS  Optimelt  MPA  100  melting  point  apparatus  and   are  uncorrected.  Optical  rotational  were  determined  using  a  Perkin–Elmer  241MC  

polarimeter  (sodium  D  line,  298  K)  in  the  indicated  solvents.  1H  and  13C  nuclear  magnetic   resonance  (NMR)  spectra  were  recorded  using  either  Varian  400  MHz,  Bruker  Ascend  400   MHz,  Bruker  Avance  400  MHz  or  Bruker  Avance  600  MHz  spectrometers  at  298  K  using   deuterated  methanol  solvent  unless  otherwise  specified.  Data  is  reported  in  parts  per  

(5)

million  (ppm),  referenced  to  residual  protons  or  13C  in  deuterated  methanol  solvent  (CD3OD:  

1H  3.31  ppm,  13C  49.00  ppm)  unless  otherwise  specified,  with  multiplicity  assigned  as  

follows:  br  =  broad,  s  =  singlet,  d  =  doublet,  dd  =  doublet  of  doublets,  t  =  triplet,  q  =  quartet,   m  =  multiplet.  Coupling  constants  J  are  reported  in  Hertz.  Low-­‐resolution  mass  spectrometry   (LRMS)  and  high-­‐resolution  mass  spectrometry  (HRMS)  were  performed  using  positive   electron  ionisation  (+EI)  on  a  Micromass  VG  Autospec  mass  spectrometer  or  negative   electrospray  ionization  (–ESI)  on  a  Micromass  ZMD  ESI-­‐Quad,  or  a  Waters  LCT  Premier  XE   mass  spectrometer.  Reactions  were  monitored  by  analytical  thin  layer  chromatography   (TLC)  using  Merck  Silica  gel  60  TLC  plates  (7:2:1  ethyl  acetate:  methanol:  water,  unless   otherwise  specified)  and  were  visualised  by  staining  with  a  solution  of  potassium  

permanganate  [KMnO4  (3  g),  K2CO3  (20  g),  NaOH  (0.25  g),  H2O  (305  mL)],  with  heating  as   required.  Liquid  chromatography  mass  spectrometry  (LCMS)  was  performed  using  an   Agilent  Technologies  Infinity  1260  LC  system  equipped  with  an  Agilent  1290  HTS  LC  Injector   and  an  Agilent  6120  Quadrupole  detector.  Injections  (10  µL)  were  resolved  with  an  Agilent   Zorbax  SP-­‐C18  UPLC  column  (2.1  mm  x  50  mm,  1.8  µm,  600  bar)  with  an  isocratic  mobile   phase  consisting  of  38%  aqueous  ammonium  acetate  (26.3  mM):  62%  methanol.  The   column  and  sample  modules  were  set  to  30  °C  and  4  °C  respectively.  

2.3.  Chemical  synthesis  

2.3.1.  General  method  for  the  small  scale  steroid  sulfation  reaction  with  purification  by  SPE   A  solution  of  SO3.py  (10.0  mg,  62.8  mmol)  in  DMF  (100  µL)  was  added  to  a  solution  of   steroid  (1.0  mg)  in  1,4-­‐dioxane  (100  µL)  and  the  resulting  solution  was  then  stirred  in  a   capped  vial  at  room  temperature  for  4  h.  The  reaction  was  then  quenched  with  water  (1.5   mL)  and  subjected  to  purification  by  SPE.  An  Oasis  WAX  SPE  cartridge  (6  cc)  was  pre-­‐

conditioned  with  methanol  (5  mL)  followed  by  water  (15  mL).  The  reaction  mixture  (1.7  mL)   was  then  loaded  onto  the  cartridge  and  eluted  under  a  positive  pressure  of  nitrogen  at  a   flow  rate  of  approximately  2  mL  min–1  with  the  following  solutions:  formic  acid  in  water  (2%  

v/v,  15  mL),  water  (15  mL),  methanol  (15  mL)  and  saturated  aqueous  ammonia  solution  in   methanol  (5%  v/v,  15  mL).  The  methanolic  ammonia  fraction  was  concentrated  in  vacuo  to   yield  the  desired  steroid  sulfate  as  the  corresponding  ammonium  salt.    

(6)

2.3.2.  General  method  for  the  small  scale  steroid  sulfation  reaction  with  conversion   determined  by  1H  NMR  analysis  

A  steroid  sulfation  reaction  was  performed  as  per  2.3.1  above.  A  modified  SPE  protocol   eluting  with  only  formic  acid  in  water  (2%  v/v,  15  mL),  water  (15  mL)  and  saturated  aqueous   ammonia  solution  in  methanol  (5%  v/v,  15  mL),  followed  by  concentration  of  the  methanolic   ammonia  fraction  yielded  a  mixture  containing  both  the  starting  steroid  and  the  

corresponding  steroid  sulfate  as  the  ammonium  salt.  A  1H  NMR  spectrum  was  obtained  and   integration  of  a  suitable  signal  (typically  C3-­‐H  or  C17-­‐H)  of  both  steroid  and  steroid  sulfate   provided  a  ratio  of  the  two  compounds  which  was  used  to  determine  the  percent  

conversion  of  the  sulfation  reaction.  The  mixture  was  then  subjected  to  a  second  SPE   purification  using  the  conditions  outlined  in  2.3.1  to  yield  pure  steroid  sulfate  as  the   corresponding  ammonium  salt.  

2.3.3.  General  method  for  the  steroid  sulfation  reaction  with  purification  by  recrystallisation   Sulfation  was  performed  by  minor  modification  of  known  literature  procedures  [17].  A   solution  of  steroid  (100  mg)  in  pyridine  (1  mL)  was  added  drop-­‐wise  to  solid  SO3.NEt3  or   SO3.py  (1.1–1.6  equiv).  The  resulting  solution  was  stirred  at  room  temperature  for  20  h   unless  otherwise  specified.  The  reaction  was  then  added  to  diethyl  ether  (20  mL)  and  the   resulting  precipitate  was  collected  by  filtration.  The  crude  steroid  sulfate  salt  was  

recrystallised  from  refluxing  dichloromethane/diethyl  ether,  washed  with  small  portions  of   cold  diethyl  ether  and  finally  dried  in  vacuo  to  yield  the  desired  steroid  sulfate  as  its  

corresponding  triethylammonium  or  pyridinium  salt.  

2.3.4.  Testosterone  17-­‐sulfate,  ammonium  salt  1a  [17]  

A  solution  of  testosterone  (1.0  mg,  3.47  µmol)  in  1,4-­‐dioxane  (100  µL)  was  treated  with  a   solution  of  SO3.py  (10.0  mg,  62.8  µmol,  18.1  equiv)  in  DMF  (100  µL)  and  purified  by  SPE  as   per  2.3.1  to  yield  the  title  compound  1a  as  a  white  solid.  Performing  the  sulfation  reaction  as   per  2.3.2  showed  full  conversion.  Rf  0.34;  δH  (400  MHz):  5.71  (s,  1H,  C4-­‐H),  4.34  (t,  J  8.6  Hz,   1H,  C17-­‐H),  2.53-­‐0.95  (m,  19H),  1.24  (s,  3H,  C18-­‐H3),  0.87  (s,  3H,  C19-­‐H3);  δC  (100  MHz):  

202.4  (C3),  175.2  (C5),  124.1  (C4),  87.9  (C17),  55.4,  55.1,  51.3,  43.8,  40.0,  37.7,  36.8,  34.7,   33.9,  32.8,  29.1,  24.3,  21.6,  17.7  (C18),  12.0  (C19);  LRMS  (–ESI):  m/z  367  (100%,  

(7)

[C19H27O5S]);  HRMS  (–ESI):  found  367.1579,  [C19H27O5S]  requires  367.1579.  Copies  of  the   400  MHz  1H  NMR,  100  MHz  13C  NMR  and  –ESI  LRMS  are  reproduced  in  the  supporting   information.  Experimental  details,  data  and  spectra  for  the  steroid  sulfate  ammonium  salts   213a  presented  in  Table  1  and  Scheme  2  are  reported  in  the  supporting  information.  

2.3.5.  Testosterone  17-­‐sulfate,  triethylammonium  salt  1b  [17]  

Testosterone  (239  mg,  0.83  mmol)  in  pyridine  (2  mL)  was  treated  with  solid  SO3.NEt3  (236   mg,  1.30  mmol,  1.6  equiv)  and  stirred  for  2  h  as  per  2.3.3  to  yield  the  title  compound  1b  (155   mg,  40%)  as  an  off  white  solid.  Rf  0.34;  mp  164–166  °C  (lit  [17]  158–163  °C);  [α]25D  +58  (c  10,   CHCl3)  (lit  [17]  [α]25D  +64  [CHCl3]);  δH  (400  MHz):  5.71  (s,  1H,  C4-­‐H),  4.23  (t,  J  8.4  Hz,  1H,  C17-­‐

H),  3.10  (q,  J  7.3  Hz,  6H,  NCH2CH3),  2.55–0.90  (m,  19H),  1.32  (t,  J  7.4  Hz,  9H,  NCH2CH3),  1.24   (s,  3H,  C18-­‐H3),  0.87  (s,  3H,  C19-­‐H3);  δC  (100  MHz):  202.4  (C3),  175.2  (C5),  124.1  (C4),  87.8   (C17),  55.4,  51.3,  47.9  (NCH2CH3),  43.9,  40.0,  37.7,  36.8,  34.7,  33.9,  32.8,  29.2,  24.3,  21.7,   17.7  (C18),  12.1  (C19),  9.2  (NCH2CH3),  one  carbon  overlapping  or  obscured;  LRMS  (–ESI):  m/z   367  (100%,  [C19H27O5S]);  HRMS  (–ESI):  found  367.1579,  [C19H27O5S]  requires  367.1579.  

Copies  of  the  400  MHz  1H  NMR,  100  MHz  13C  NMR  and  –ESI  LRMS  are  reproduced  in  the   supporting  information.  Experimental  details,  data  and  spectra  for  the  steroid  sulfate   triethylammonium  salts  25,  7  and  9b  presented  in  Table  1  are  reported  in  the  supporting   information.  

2.3.6.  Testosterone  17-­‐sulfate,  pyridinium  salt  1c  [25]  

Testosterone  (216  mg,  0.75  mmol)  in  pyridine  (2  mL)  was  treated  with  solid  SO3.py  (134  mg,   0.84  mmol,  1.1  equiv)  as  per  2.3.3  to  yield  the  title  compound  1c  (145  mg,  43%)  as  an  off   white  solid.  Rf  0.34;  mp  140–145  °C  (lit  [25]  138–140  °C);  [α]25D  +52  (c  10,  CHCl3)  (lit  [26]  

[α]25D  +200  [c  10,  MeOH]);  δH  (400  MHz):  8.88  (m,  2H,  o-­‐pyridinium),  8.68  (m,  1H,  p-­‐

pyridinium),  8.14  (m,  2H,  m-­‐pyridinium),  5.71  (s,  1H,  C4-­‐H),  4.30  (t,  J  8.6  Hz,  1H,  C17-­‐H),   2.55–0.86  (m,  19H),  1.24  (s,  3H,  C18-­‐H3),  0.86  (s,  3H,  C19-­‐H3);  δC  (100  MHz):  202.4  (C3),   175.1  (C5),  148.5  (o-­‐pyridinium),  143.0  (p-­‐pyridinium),  128.9  (m-­‐pyridinium),  124.2  (C4),   87.9  (C17),  55.4,  51.3,  43.8,  40.1,  37.7,  36.7  (2  C),  32.7,  32.6,  29.2,  24.3,  21.7,  17.7  (C18),   12.1  (C19),  one  carbon  overlapping  or  obscured;  LRMS  (–ESI):  m/z  367  (100%,  [C19H27O5S]),   97  (20%,  [HSO4]);  HRMS  (–ESI)  found  367.1579,  [C19H27O5S]  requires  367.1579.  Copies  of   the  400  MHz  1H  NMR,  100  MHz  13C  NMR  and  –ESI  LRMS  are  reproduced  in  the  supporting  

(8)

information.  Experimental  details,  data  and  spectra  for  etiocholanolone  3-­‐sulfate  pyridinium   salt  6c  presented  in  Table  1  is  reported  in  the  supporting  information.  

2.3.7.  Estrone  (3-­‐hydroxyestra-­‐1,3,5(10)-­‐triene-­‐17-­‐one)  3-­‐sulfate,  ammonium  salt  14a  [23]  

Chlorosulfonic  acid  [CAUTION!  Corrosive.  Use  in  an  efficient  fume  hood.]  (10  µL,  150.0   µmol,  8.1  equiv)  was  slowly  added  to  a  solution  of  estrone  (5.0  mg,  18.5  µmol)  in  pyridine   (50  µL)  with  cooling  on  ice.  After  the  vigorous  reaction  had  subsided,  the  reaction  was   capped,  allowed  to  warm  and  then  stirred  at  room  temperature  for  20  h.  The  reaction  was   quenched  by  the  slow  addition  of  water  (1.5  mL)  and  then  purified  by  SPE  as  per  2.3.1  to   yield  the  title  compound  14a  as  a  yellow-­‐brown  solid.  Performing  the  sulfation  reaction  as   per  2.3.2  showed  65%  conversion.  Rf  0.49;  mp  150–155  °C;  δH  (400  MHz):  7.25  (d,  J  8.4  Hz,   1H,  C1-­‐H),  7.08–7.01  (m,  2H,  C2-­‐H  and  C4-­‐H),  2.95–2.87  (m,  2H,  C6-­‐H2),  2.55–1.40  (m,  13H),   0.92  (s,  3H,  C18-­‐H3);  δC  (100  MHz):  223.7  (C17),  151.8  (C3),  138.7,  137.6,  127.0,  119.8,  112.5,   51.7,  45.5,  39.7,  36.7,  32.8,  30.5,  27.6,  27.0,  23.3,  22.5,  14.2  (C18);  LRMS  (–ESI):  m/z  349   (100%,  [C18H21O5S]),  269  (40%),  97  (20%,  [HSO4]),  80  (25%,  [SO3]);  HRMS  (–ESI):  found   349.1110,  ([C18H21O5S])  requires  349.1110.  Copies  of  the  400  MHz  1H  NMR,  100  MHz  13C   NMR  and  –ESI  LRMS  are  reproduced  in  the  supporting  information.  

2.3.8.  Estrone  3-­‐sulfate,  pyridinium  salt  14c  [25,26]  

Chlorosulfonic  acid  [CAUTION!  Corrosive.  Use  in  an  efficient  fume  hood.]  (620  µL,  9.33   mmol,  5.0  equiv)  was  added  drop-­‐wise  to  a  rapidly  stirring  solution  of  estrone  (505  mg,  1.87   mmol)  in  pyridine  with  cooling  on  ice.  After  the  vigorous  reaction  subsided  the  reaction  was   allowed  to  warm  to  room  temperature  and  then  stirred  for  20  h.  The  reaction  was  then   added  to  aqueous  potassium  hydroxide  solution  (0.1  M,  30  mL)  and  extracted  into  ethyl   acetate  (4  x  50  mL)  and  3:1  chloroform-­‐isopropanol  solution  (4  x  40  mL).  The  combined   organic  extracts  were  dried  with  magnesium  sulfate  and  evaporated  to  dryness.  The  crude   steroid  sulfate  salt  was  recrystallised  as  per  2.3.3  to  yield  the  title  compound  14c  (199  mg,   25%)  as  a  white  solid.  Rf  0.45;  mp  165–169  °C  (lit  [26]  170–175  °C);  [α]25D  +79  (c  10,  CHCl3)   (lit  [26]  [α]25D  +84  [c  0.96,  CHCl3]);  δH  (400  MHz):  8.88  (m,  2H,  o-­‐pyridinium),  8.68  (m,  1H,   p-­‐pyridinium),  8.12  (m,  2H,  m-­‐pyridinium),  7.24  (d,  J  8.4  Hz,  1H,  C1-­‐H),  7.07–7.01  (m,  2H,  C2-­‐

H  and  C4-­‐H),  2.95–2.90  (m,  2H,  C6-­‐H2),  2.55–1.40  (m,  13H),  0.92  (s,  3H,  C18-­‐H3);  

δC  (100  MHz):  224.1  (C17),  151.5  (C3),  148.2  (o-­‐pyridinium),  142.8  (p-­‐pyridinium),  138.2,  

(9)

137.5,  128.9  (m-­‐pyridinium),  127.2,  120.0,  112.7,  51.7,  45.4,  39.8,  36.8,  32.9,  30.3,  27.5,   27.0,  23.2,  22.6,  14.3  (C18);  LRMS  (–ESI):  m/z  349  (100%,  [C18H21O5S]),  269  (40%),  97  (20%,   [HSO4]),  80  (25%,  [SO3]);  HRMS  (–ESI):  found  349.1110,  [C18H21O5S]  requires  349.1110.  

Copies  of  the  400  MHz  1H  NMR,  100  MHz  13C  NMR  and  –ESI  LRMS  are  reproduced  in  the   supporting  information.  

2.3.9.  Estradiol  (estra-­‐1,3,5(10)-­‐triene-­‐3,17β-­‐diol)  3-­‐sulfate,  ammonium  salt  15a  

A  solution  of  estrone  3-­‐sulfate,  ammonium  salt  14a  (derived  from  estrone,  5.0  mg,  18.5   µmol)  in  methanol  (100  µL)  was  slowly  added  to  solid  sodium  borohydride  (7  mg,  185  µmol   10.0  equiv)  with  cooling  on  ice.  After  the  vigorous  reaction  had  subsided  the  reaction  was   capped,  allowed  to  warm  to  room  temperature  and  stirred  for  4  h.  The  reaction  was   quenched  by  the  slow  addition  of  water  (3  mL),  adjusted  to  pH  7  (universal  indicator  strips)   by  addition  of  aqueous  hydrochloric  acid  (0.1  M,  ~2  mL)  and  then  purified  by  SPE  as  per   2.3.1  to  yield  the  title  compound  15a  as  a  white  solid.  Performing  the  reduction  reaction   above  with  SPE  purifications  as  per  2.3.2  showed  full  conversion.  Rf  0.54;  δH  (400  MHz):  7.23   (d,  J  8.4  Hz,  1H,  C1-­‐H),  7.08–6.98  (m,  2H,  C2-­‐H  and  C4-­‐H),  3.67  (t,  J  8.6  Hz,  1H,  C17-­‐H),  2.89–

2.83  (m,  2H,  C6-­‐H2),  2.40–1.15  (m,  13H),  0.78  (s,  3H,  C18-­‐H3);  δC  (100  MHz):  151.7  (C3),   138.8,  138.1,  127.0,  122.5,  119.7,  82.5  (C17),  51.4,  45.5,  44.4,  40.3,  38.0,  30.7,  30.6,  28.4,   27.5,  24.0,  11.7  (C18);  LRMS  (–ESI):  m/z  351  (100%,  [C18H23O5S]);  HRMS  (–ESI):  found   351.1266,  [C18H23O5S]  requires  351.1266.  Copies  of  the  400  MHz  1H  NMR,  100  MHz  13C   NMR  and  –ESI  LRMS  are  reproduced  in  the  supporting  information.  

2.3.10.  Estrone  2-­‐sulfonate,  ammonium  salt  16a  

Employing  conditions  developed  by  Dusza,  Joseph  and  Bernstein  [19],  solid  estrone  (5.0  mg,   18.5  µmol)  was  mixed  with  solid  SO3.py  (15  mg,  94.2  µmol,  5.1  equiv)  and  heated  at  180  °C   for  15  min  in  an  oil  bath.  The  resulting  brown  melt  was  allowed  to  cool,  quenched  with   water  (1.5  mL)  and  then  purified  by  SPE  as  per  2.3.1  to  yield  the  title  compound  16a  as  a   yellow-­‐brown  solid.  Performing  the  sulfation  reaction  as  per  2.3.2  showed  full  conversion.  Rf   0.36;  mp  180–183  °C;  δH  (400  MHz):  7.57  (s,  1H,  C1-­‐H),  6.59  (s,  1H,  C4-­‐H),  2.90–2.83  (m,  2H,   C6-­‐H2),  2.55–1.40  (m,  13H),  0.92  (s,  3H,  C18-­‐H3);  δC  (100  MHz):  223.  7  (C17),  152.8,  142.7,   132.3,  127.3,  125.3,  117.7,  51.6,  45.1,  39.7,  36.7,  32.7,  30.3,  27.5,  26.9,  22.5,  14.3  (C18),  one   carbon  overlapping  or  obscured;  LRMS  (–ESI):  m/z  349  (100%,  [C18H21O5S]),  97  (30%,  

(10)

[HSO4]),  80  (20%,  [SO3]);  HRMS  (–ESI):  found  349.1097,  [C18H21O5S]  requires  349.1110.  

Copies  of  the  400  MHz  1H  NMR,  100  MHz  13C  NMR  and  –ESI  LRMS  are  reproduced  in  the   supporting  information.  

 

3.  Results  and  discussion  

3.1.  Sulfation  reaction  conditions  

Of  the  variety  of  conditions  available  in  the  literature,  the  application  of  sulfur  trioxide   amine  complexes  appeared  to  offer  the  greatest  utility  due  to  their  commercial  availability,   ease  of  handling,  reasonable  stability  to  residual  moisture  and  mild  reaction  conditions  as   opposed  to  competing  methods  [14–23].  In  our  hands  sulfur  trioxide  pyridine  complex  could   be  briefly  weighed  in  the  laboratory  without  special  precautions.  A  solution  of  sulfur  trioxide   pyridine  complex  in  DMF  (100  mg  mL–1)  was  used  for  the  sulfation  reactions  and  when   stored  in  a  sealed  vial  at  4  °C  maintained  activity  for  2  weeks.  In  contrast  to  typical  steroid   sulfation  reactions  which  use  pyridine  as  the  reaction  solvent  [16–18],  DMF  and  1,4-­‐dioxane   were  used  instead  to  maintain  compatibility  with  the  SPE  protocol  (2.3.1)  and  to  reduce   toxicity  and  odour  concerns.  Our  reaction  protocol  involved  treatment  of  a  solution  of   steroid  in  1,4-­‐dioxane  with  a  solution  of  excess  sulfur  trioxide  pyridine  complex  in  DMF,   followed  by  quenching  with  water  and  SPE  as  shown  in  Scheme  1,  below.  Under  these   conditions  testosterone  (1  mg)  could  be  reliably  converted  to  testosterone  17-­‐sulfate  1a   with  >98%  conversion.  On  a  larger  scale  (10  mg)  synthesis  of  testosterone  17-­‐sulfate  1a  the   isolated  yield  (94%)  showed  reasonable  concordance  with  this  high  conversion.  These   conditions  proved  quite  general  for  the  synthesis  of  a  wide  range  of  secondary  alcohol-­‐

derived  steroid  sulfates  113a  (Table  1,  Scheme  2).  Modified  conditions  were  required  for   the  synthesis  of  estrone  3-­‐sulfate  derivatives  (3.5  below).    

To  further  confirm  the  identity  of  these  steroid  sulfate  ammonium  salts  prepared  by  small   scale  synthesis  and  SPE,  a  range  of  known  reference  compounds  were  also  prepared  using   larger  scale  sulfation  and  recrystallisation  [17]  as  either  the  triethylammonium  salts  15,  7   and  9b  or  pyridinium  salts  1  and  6c  (Table  1).  These  materials  allowed  for  comparison  of  the   different  salts  by  NMR  and  MS  as  detailed  below  (3.3)  

(11)

<Scheme  1  here>  

3.2.  Solid-­‐phase  extraction  purification  

Traditionally  one  or  more  recrystallizations  or  chromatographic  separations  are  required  to   purify  steroid  sulfate  compounds  to  an  acceptable  standard  for  analytical  use  [16–18].  This   is  not  practical  however  when  utilising  small  quantities  of  material,  as  often  might  be  the   case  with  rare  or  expensive  steroids  or  isotope-­‐labelled  samples.  To  circumvent  this  

problem  we  adopted  SPE  which  has  been  routinely  used  in  anti-­‐doping  laboratories  for  the   extraction  of  steroids  and  other  compounds  from  biological  matrices  such  as  blood  and   urine  [27–29].  Rather  surprisingly,  despite  the  extensive  application  of  SPE  in  chemical   analysis,  it  has  not  been  widely  used  for  the  preparation  of  steroid  sulfates,  and  where   employed,  typically  forms  only  part  of  the  purification  process  [30–32].    

Our  SPE  purification  protocol  adopted  Oasis  WAX  cartridges  which  contain  a  mixed-­‐mode   polymeric/weak  anion  exchange  resin  allowing  fractionation  of  the  anionic  steroid  sulfate   from  any  residual  neutral  steroidal  alcohol  and  other  non-­‐volatile  reaction  components.  

Cartridges  were  pre-­‐conditioned  with  methanol  followed  by  water  then  loaded  directly  with   the  quenched  reaction  mixture.  Washing  the  cartridge  sequentially  with  aqueous  formic   acid  solution  (2%  v/v),  water  and  finally  methanol  eluted  any  residual  steroidal  alcohol  and   other  reaction  components.  A  final  elution  with  saturated  aqueous  ammonia  in  methanol   (5%  v/v)  afforded  the  desired  steroid  sulfate  as  the  ammonium  salt  after  removal  of  eluant   under  reduced  pressure.  Alternatively,  the  methanolic  ammonia  fraction  could  be  dried  at   60  °C  for  1  h  under  stream  of  nitrogen  to  give  the  steroid  sulfate,  albeit  with  trace  amounts   of  ammonium  formate  observable  in  the  1H  NMR  spectrum.  During  development,  this  SPE   protocol  was  shown  to  cleanly  and  efficiently  separate  an  equimolar  mixture  of  

testosterone  and  testosterone  17-­‐sulfate  1a.  Purification  of  reactions  conducted  on  5  mg  of   steroidal  alcohol  or  less  were  readily  conducted  using  a  single  500  mg  resin  (6  cc)  SPE   cartridge,  with  larger  scale  synthesis  requiring  purification  in  parallel.    

The  SPE  protocol  outlined  above  resulted  in  the  efficient  purification  of  all  steroid  sulfates   investigated  with  the  exception  of  the  lithocholic  acid  3-­‐sulfate  9a.  In  this  case  the  

lithocholic  acid  starting  material  contains  a  carboxylate  sidechain  that  can  also  interact  with   the  anion  exchange  resin  leading  to  co-­‐elution  with  lithocholic  acid  sulfate  9a  in  the  

(12)

methanolic  ammonia  wash.  In  this  instance,  washing  the  cartridge  with  formic  acid  in   methanol  (2%  v/v,  15  mL)  was  employed  to  elute  lithocholic  acid,  with  lithocholic  acid   sulfate  9a  then  eluted  cleanly  by  methanolic  ammonia  in  the  final  step.  

Given  the  typically  small  scale  of  the  synthesis,  determining  the  mass  of  product  and  hence   chemical  yield  with  precision  was  not  feasible.  To  address  this  we  elected  to  monitor  the   conversion  of  starting  material  to  product  by  1H  NMR  integration.  Omitting  the  methanol   wash  step  in  the  SPE  method  (2.3.1)  resulted  in  the  elution  by  methanolic  ammonia  of  a   combined  fraction  containing  both  free  steroid  and  steroid  sulfate.  This  was  then  subjected   to  400  MHz  1H  NMR  integration  of  selected  steroidal  protons  in  both  the  starting  material   and  product  allowing  for  the  determination  of  reaction  conversion  as  reported  in  table  1.  

For  the  secondary  steroidal  alcohols  studied,  sulfation  occurred  with  97%  conversion  or   greater.  This  contrasted  with  the  larger  scale  sulfation  reactions  that  employed  purification   by  recrystallisation,  which  afforded  moderate  21–76%  isolated  yields  (Table  1,  entries  17   and  9b/c).  

3.3.  NMR  and  MS  analysis  of  steroid  sulfates  

For  each  steroid  investigated,  (Table  1,  Scheme  2),  conducting  the  reaction  on  a  1–2  mg   scale  afforded  sufficient  pure  steroid  sulfate  to  conduct  400  or  600  MHz  1H  NMR  analysis.  

The  compounds  obtained  by  this  sulfation  protocol  were  of  high  purity  (>95%)  as  assessed   by  this  technique  (copies  of  NMR  spectra  for  each  steroid  sulfate  are  reproduced  in  the   supporting  information).  For  the  secondary  steroidal  alcohols  studied,  sulfation  resulted  in  a   0.58–0.74  ppm  downfield  shift  of  the  oxymethine  proton  at  the  reaction  site,  as  expected   based  on  electronic  considerations.  For  the  phenolic  substrates  estrone  and  estradiol,   sulfation  similarly  resulted  in  a  0.50  ppm  downfield  shift  of  the  protons  ortho  to  the  sulfate   ester  and  a  smaller  downfield  shift  of  0.18  ppm  for  H1  relative  to  the  parent  steroid.  Overlay   of  the  1H  NMR  spectra  derived  from  the  steroid  sulfate  ammonium  salts  17,  9a  and  14a   prepared  by  small  scale  synthesis  and  SPE  with  the  triethylammonium  salts  15,  7,  and  9b,   or  pyridinium  salts  1,  6  and  14c,  prepared  by  large  scale  synthesis  and  recrystallisation   showed  identical  signals  for  the  protons  of  the  steroidal  nucleus,  further  supporting  the   identity  of  these  compounds.  Further,  SPE  purification  of  testosterone  17-­‐sulfate,   pyridinium  salt  1c  by  the  general  method  (2.3.1)  afforded  testosterone  17-­‐sulfate,  

(13)

ammonium  salt  1a  which  was  identical  in  all  respects  with  that  obtained  directly  from   testosterone  using  the  direct  small  scale  synthesis  (2.3.4).  

During  this  study  we  found  that  the  literature  contained  little  or  no  characterisation  data  for   several  of  the  steroid  sulfate  ammonium  salt  products  that  were  prepared  in  the  screen.  To   address  this,  we  scaled  up  our  syntheses  of  these  steroid  sulfates  36,  8,  13  and  15a  

specifically  those  derived  from  androstanolone  (17β-­‐hydroxy-­‐5α-­‐androstan-­‐3-­‐one),  

androsterone,  epiandrosterone,  estradiol,  etiocholanolone  and  methandriol,  obtaining  full  

1H,  13C  NMR,  and  MS  data  for  each.  Further,  both  the  small  and  large  scale  synthesis  

provided  significant  additional  1H,  13C  NMR,  and  MS  data,  as  well  as  spectra  for  the  majority   of  steroid  sulfates  shown  in  table  1.  The  designer  steroids  furazadrol  (17β-­‐

hydroxyandrostan-­‐[2,3-­‐d]isoxazole),  isofurazadrol  (17β-­‐hydroxyandrostan[3,2-­‐c]isoxazole)   and  trenazone  (17β-­‐hydroxyestra-­‐4,9-­‐dien-­‐3-­‐one)  gave  rise  to  previously  un-­‐reported   sulfate  conjugates  1012a  that  were  also  prepared  on  a  scale  suitable  for  full  

characterisation.  

Mass  spectrometry  was  also  used  to  characterise  the  steroid  sulfates  prepared.  In  each  case   the  steroid  sulfate,  ammonium  salts  exhibited  satisfactory  purity  and  identity  by  –ESI  LRMS   and  HRMS  respectively.  Further  the  steroid  sulfate  ammonium  salts  17,  9  and  14a  

prepared  by  small  scale  synthesis  and  SPE  showed  identical,  albeit  simple,  –ESI  LRMS   behaviour  with  the  triethylammonium  salts  15,  7  and  9b,  or  pyridinium  salts  1,  6  and  14c,   prepared  by  large  scale  synthesis  and  recrystallisation.  

<Table  1  here>  

3.4.  Sulfation  of  secondary  steroidal  alcohols  

The  small  scale  synthesis  and  purification  of  steroid  sulfates  proved  highly  effective  for  a   wide  variety  of  secondary  steroidal  alcohol  substitution  patterns  and  configurations  (Table   1,  Scheme  2).  For  methandriol  (Table  1,  entry  8a),  which  possesses  both  secondary  3β-­‐  and   tertiary  17β-­‐hydroxyl  groups,  mono-­‐sulfation  was  observed  to  take  place  regioselectively  at   the  secondary  hydroxyl  group  to  cleanly  give  methandriol  3-­‐sulfate  8a.  A  0.74  ppm  

downfield  shift  the  H3  proton  was  observed  in  the  1H  NMR  spectrum  consistent  with  

sulfation  at  C3  as  expected  based  on  steric  considerations.  The  sulfation  of  tertiary  hydroxyl  

(14)

groups  has  been  reported  on  a  larger  scale  with  sulfur  trioxide  pyridine  complex  [33]  or  the   more  reactive  chlorosulfonic  acid  reagent  [34].  The  tertiary  alkyl  sulfate  esters  so  derived   are  typically  unstable  and  undergo  elimination,  rearrangement  or  hydrolysis  under  ambient   conditions  [33,35,36].  The  sulfation  of  lithocholic  acid  which  possesses  both  a  secondary  3β-­‐

hydroxyl  group  and  a  carboxylic  acid  also  proceeded  without  incident  using  a  modified  SPE   method.    

3.5.  Sulfation  of  estrogenic  steroidal  alcohols  

Although  estrogenic  steroids  are  not  typically  considered  candidates  for  use  as  performance   enhancing  substances  in  sport,  they  may  offer  indirect  advantages  [37].  Additionally,  these   compounds  and  their  in  vivo  metabolites  play  host  a  wide  range  of  biological  functions  that   have  important  applications  in  medical  science  [3].  Sulfate  conjugates  of  the  estrogens  were   therefore  attractive  targets  for  synthesis.  Attempted  sulfation  of  estrone  under  standard   conditions  (2.3.1)  failed  to  afford  the  desired  estrone  3-­‐sulfate,  reflecting  significant   differences  in  reactivity  for  aliphatic  versus  phenolic  hydroxyl  groups.  This  is  despite   literature  reports  describing  the  formation  of  phenolic  sulfates  under  similar  conditions   [17,18].  This  observation  proved  useful  for  the  selective  sulfation  under  standard  conditions   (2.3.1)  of  estradiol  to  afford  estradiol  17-­‐sulfate  13a  in  which  reaction  occurs  at  the  

secondary  alkyl  C17  hydroxyl  group  (Scheme  2)  [18].  

<Scheme  2  here>  

A  range  of  conditions  were  investigated  in  efforts  to  effect  sulfation  of  estrone  on  a  small   scale.  Employing  an  excess  of  chlorosulfonic  acid  [CAUTION]  in  pyridine  gave  estrone  3-­‐

sulfate  14a  with  65%  conversion  [15].  Fortunately,  these  conditions  were  compatible  with   our  existing  SPE  method  (2.3.1)  providing  the  sulfate  in  pure  form.  A  0.50  ppm  downfield   shift  the  H2  and  H4  protons  were  observed  in  the  1H  NMR  spectrum  consistent  with   sulfation  at  H3.  To  extend  this  chemistry,  sodium  borohydride  reduction  of  the  resulting   estrone  3-­‐sulfate  14a  was  used  to  selectively  afford  estradiol  3-­‐sulfate  15a  after  SPE   purification.    

During  efforts  to  obtain  estrone  3-­‐sulfate  we  also  investigated  the  so-­‐called  “fusion”  

method  whereby  a  neat  mixture  of  the  steroid  and  sulfur  trioxide  pyridine  complex  are  

(15)

heated  together  at  180  °C,  thereby  conducting  the  sulfation  reaction  in  the  melt  [19].  This   method  led  to  the  unexpected  formation  of  the  isomeric  steroid  derivative  estrone  2-­‐

sulfonate  16a,  a  product  of  electrophilic  aromatic  substitution  presumably  promoted  by  the   high  reaction  temperature.  The  400  MHz  1H  NMR  spectrum  showed  two  singlets  at  δ  7.57   and  6.59  consistent  with  the  proposed  structure.  This  result  suggests  some  caution  is   warranted  in  applying  the  fusion  method  for  the  synthesis  of  aromatic  sulfates.  

3.6.  Sulfation  on  the  microgram  scale  

Finally,  we  wished  to  explore  the  suitability  of  this  approach  to  the  synthesis  of  analytical   quantities  of  material  by  applying  this  protocol  to  a  microgram  scale  synthesis  of  

testosterone  17-­‐sulfate  1a.  Success  with  such  small  quantities  would  have  important   applications  for  the  sulfation  of  rare  and  expensive  steroid  compounds  such  as  novel   designer  steroids  or  isotope  labelled  compounds  [38]  where  significant  time,  resource  or   financial  costs  are  involved  in  obtaining  sufficient  quantities  of  material  for  analysis.  In   addition,  it  raised  the  prospect  of  generating  phase  II  steroid  sulfates  from  phase  I  steroid   metabolites  isolated  from  biological  samples.  When  the  protocol  was  applied  to  a  series  of   reactions  with  testosterone  (100  µg  to  1  µg),  analysis  by  LCMS  allowed  detection  of  the   product  steroid  sulfate  by  single  ion  monitoring  (SIM,  m/z  –367)  even  at  the  lowest  

concentration  trialled  (1  µg),  and  near-­‐quantitative  conversion  (1.28±0.04  µg  testosterone   sulfate,  95±3%  HPLC  yield,  mean±sem,  n=3)  to  the  desired  sulfate  was  still  observed  at  these   levels.  These  results  highlight  the  power  of  this  approach  for  the  small  scale  synthesis  of   steroid  sulfate  compounds  for  analytical  purposes.  

 

Conclusion  

Employing  a  small  scale  sulfation  protocol  with  purification  by  SPE,  sixteen  steroid  sulfates   have  been  synthesised  on  a  milligram  scale  with  near-­‐complete  conversion,  including  the   previously  unreported  sulfate  conjugates  of  the  designer  steroids  furazadrol,  isofurazadrol   and  trenazone.  The  scope  of  this  approach  for  small  scale  synthesis  is  highlighted  by  the   sulfation  of  one  microgram  of  testosterone  as  monitored  by  LCMS.  This  quick  and  simple   protocol  employs  commercially  available  consumables  and  reagents  and  allows  the  rapid  

(16)

and  efficient  synthesis  and  purification  of  steroid  sulfate  compounds.  The  method  is  suitable   for  use  in  analytical  laboratories  and  should  serve  to  expand  the  availability  of  steroid   sulfate  reference  materials  for  a  range  of  analytical  applications.    

 

Acknowledgements  

We  thank  the  Australian  Research  Council  (LP120200444)  for  financial  support.  We  thank  Dr   Bradley  Stevenson  for  assistance  with  LCMS.  

 

Supplementary  material  

Supporting  information  containing  experimental  procedures,  characterisation  data,  NMR   and  MS  spectra  for  all  compounds  can  be  found,  in  the  online  version,  at  

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.steroids………  

 

References  

[1]   Gomes  RL,  Meredith  W,  Snape  CE,  Sephton  MA.  Analysis  of  conjugated  steroid   androgens:  Deconjugation,  derivatisation  and  associated  issues.  J  Pharm  Biomed   Anal  2009;49:1133–40.  

[2]   Anizan  S,  Di  Nardo  D,  Bichon  E,  Monteau  F,  Cesbron  N,  Antignac  J-­‐P,  et  al.  Targeted   phase  II  metabolites  profiling  as  new  screening  strategy  to  investigate  natural  steroid   abuse  in  animal  breeding.  Anal  Chim  Acta  2011;700:105–13.  

[3]   Nussbaumer  P,  Billich  A.  Steroid  sulfatase  inhibitors.  Med  Res  Rev  2004;24:529–76.  

[4]   Tudela  E,  Deventer  K,  Geldof  L,  Van  Eenoo  P.  Urinary  detection  of  conjugated  and   unconjugated  anabolic  steroids  by  dilute-­‐and-­‐shoot  liquid  chromatography-­‐high   resolution  mass  spectrometry.  Drug  Test  Anal  2014:  in  press,  DOI:  10.1002/dta.1650   [5]   Deventer  K,  Pozo  OJ,  Verstraete  AG,  Van  Eenoo  P.  Dilute-­‐and-­‐shoot-­‐liquid  

chromatography-­‐mass  spectrometry  for  urine  analysis  in  doping  control  and   analytical  toxicology.  TrAC  Trends  Anal  Chem  2014;55:1–13.  

[6]   Thevis  M,  Kuuranne  T,  Geyer  H,  Schänzer  W.  Annual  banned-­‐substance  review:  

analytical  approaches  in  human  sports  drug  testing.  Drug  Test  Anal  2013;5:1–19.  

(17)

[7]   Kuuranne  T.  Phase-­‐II  metabolism  of  androgens  and  its  relevance  for  doping  control   analysis.  In:  Thieme  D,  Hemmersbach  P,  editors.  Doping  in  Sports,  Springer–Verlag:  

Berlin;  2010,  p.  65–75.  

[8]   Gómez  C,  Pozo  OJ,  Marcos  J,  Segura  J,  Ventura  R.  Alternative  long-­‐term  markers  for   the  detection  of  methyltestosterone  misuse.  Steroids  2013;78:44–52.  

[9]   Strahm  E,  Baume  N,  Mangin  P,  Saugy  M,  Ayotte  C,  Saudan  C.  Profiling  of  19-­‐

norandrosterone  sulfate  and  glucuronide  in  human  urine:  Implications  in  athlete’s   drug  testing.  Steroids  2009;74:359–64.  

[10]   Torrado  S,  Roig  M,  Farré  M,  Segura  J,  Ventura  R.  Urinary  metabolic  profile  of  19-­‐

norsteroids  in  humans:  glucuronide  and  sulphate  conjugates  after  oral   administration  of  19-­‐nor-­‐4-­‐androstenediol.  Rapid  Commun  Mass  Spectrom   2008;22:3035–42.  

[11]   Badoud  F,  Boccard  J,  Schweizer  C,  Pralong  F,  Saugy  M,  Baume  N.  Profiling  of  steroid   metabolites  after  transdermal  and  oral  administration  of  testosterone  by  ultra-­‐high   pressure  liquid  chromatography  coupled  to  quadrupole  time-­‐of-­‐flight  mass  

spectrometry.  J  Steroid  Biochem  Mol  Biol  2013;138:222–35.  

[12]   Gómez  C,  Pozo  OJ,  Geyer  H,  Marcos  J,  Thevis  M,  Schänzer  W,  et  al.  New  potential   markers  for  the  detection  of  boldenone  misuse.  J  Steroid  Biochem  Mol  Biol   2012;132:239–46.  

[13]   Boccard  J,  Badoud  F,  Grata  E,  Ouertani  S,  Hanafi  M,  Mazerolles  G,  et  al.  A  

steroidomic  approach  for  biomarkers  discovery  in  doping  control.  Forensic  Sci  Int   2011;213:85–94.  

[14]   Sobel  AE,  Drekter  IJ,  Natelson  S.  Estimation  of  small  amounts  of  cholesterol  as  the   pyridine  cholesteryl  sulfate.  J  Biol  Chem  1936;115:381–90.  

[15]   Fieser  LF.  Naphthoquinone  antimalarials.  XVI.  Water-­‐soluble  derivatives  of  alcoholic   and  unsaturated  compounds.  J  Am  Chem  Soc  1948;70:3232–7.  

[16]   Sobel  AE,  Spoerri  PE.  Steryl  sulfates.  I.  Preparation  and  properties.  J  Am  Chem  Soc   1941;63:1259–61.  

[17]   Dusza  JP,  Joseph  JP,  Bernstein  S.  Steroid  conjugates  IV.  The  preparation  of  steroid   sulfates  with  triethylamine-­‐sulfur  trioxide.  Steroids  1968;12:49–61.  

[18]   Dusza  JP,  Joseph  JP,  Bernstein  S.  The  preparation  of  estradiol-­‐17β  sulfates  with   triethylamine-­‐sulfur  trioxide.  Steroids  1985;45:303–15.  

[19]   Dusza  JP,  Joseph  JP,  Bernstein  S.  A  fusion  method  for  the  preparation  of  steroid   sulfates.  Steroids  1985;45:317–23.  

[20]   Mumma  RO.  Preparation  of  sulfate  esters.  Lipids  1966;1:221–3.  

(18)

[21]   Joseph  JP,  Dusza  JP,  Bernstein  S.  Steroid  conjugates  I.  The  use  of  sulfamic  acid  for  the   preparation  of  steroid  sulfates.  Steroids  1966;7:577–87.  

[22]   Desoky  AY,  Hendel  J,  Ingram  L,  Taylor  SD.  Preparation  of  trifluoroethyl-­‐  and  phenyl-­‐

protected  sulfates  using  sulfuryl  imidazolium  salts.  Tetrahedron  2011;67:1281–7.  

[23]   Liu  Y,  Lien  I-­‐FF,  Ruttgaizer  S,  Dove  P,  Taylor  SD.  Synthesis  and  protection  of  aryl   sulfates  using  the  2,2,2-­‐trichloroethyl  moiety.  Org  Lett  2004;6:209–12.  

[24]   Martin  SF,  Dodge  JA.  Efficacious  modification  of  the  Mitsunobu  reaction  for  

inversions  of  sterically  hindered  secondary  alcohols.  Tetrahedron  Lett  1991;32:3017–

20.  

[25]   Marian  M,  Matkovics  B,  Vargha  SJ.  Steroids.  XIV.  Preparation  of  steroid  sulfate  salts.  

Acta  Phys  Chem  1971;17:85–9.  

[26]   McKenna  J,  Norymberski  JK.  773.  Steroid  sulphates.  Part  I.  Some  solvolytic  reactions   of  the  salts  of  steroid  sulphates.  J  Chem  Soc  1957:3889–93.  

[27]   Keevil  BG.  Novel  liquid  chromatography  tandem  mass  spectrometry  (LC-­‐MS/MS)   methods  for  measuring  steroids.  Best  Pract  Res  Clin  Endocrinol  Metab  2013;27:663–

74.  

[28]   Tomšíková  H,  Aufartová  J,  Solich  P,  Nováková  L,  Sosa-­‐Ferrera  Z,  Santana-­‐Rodríguez  JJ.  

High-­‐sensitivity  analysis  of  female-­‐steroid  hormones  in  environmental  samples.  TrAC   Trends  Anal  Chem  2012;34:35–58.  

[29]   Gomes  RL,  Meredith  W,  Snape  CE,  Sephton  MA.  Conjugated  steroids:  analytical   approaches  and  applications.  Anal  Bioanal  Chem  2009;393:453–8.  

[30]   Richmond  V,  Murray  AP,  Maier  MS.  Synthesis  and  acetylcholinesterase  inhibitory   activity  of  polyhydroxylated  sulfated  steroids:  Structure/activity  studies.  Steroids   2013;78:1141–7.  

[31]   Ikegawa  S,  Nagae  K,  Mabuchi  T,  Okihara  R,  Hasegawa  M,  Minematsu  T,  et  al.  

Synthesis  of  3-­‐  and  21-­‐monosulfates  of  [2,2,3β,4,4-­‐2H5]-­‐tetrahydrocorticosteroids  in   the  5β-­‐series  as  internal  standards  for  mass  spectrometry.  Steroids  2011;76:1232–

40.  

[32]   Kirk  DN,  Rajagopalan  MS.  18-­‐Substituted  steroids.  Part  12.  Synthesis  of  aldosterone   21-­‐sulphate,  and  an  improved  general  procedure  for  preparing  steroid  sulphates.  J   Chem  Soc  Perkin  Trans  1  1987:1339–42.  

[33]   Schänzer  W,  Opfermann  G,  Donike  M.  17-­‐Epimerization  of  17α-­‐methyl  anabolic   steroids  in  humans:  metabolism  and  synthesis  of  17α-­‐hydroxy-­‐17β-­‐methyl  steroids.  

Steroids  1992;57:537–50.  

[34]   Bi  H,  Massé  R,  Just  G.  Studies  on  anabolic  steroids.  9.  Tertiary  sulfates  of  anabolic   17α-­‐methyl  steroids:  synthesis  and  rearrangement.  Steroids  1992;57:306–12.  

(19)

[35]   Bi  H,  Massé  R.  Studies  on  anabolic  steroids—12.  Epimerization  and  degradation  of   anabolic  17β-­‐sulfate-­‐17α-­‐methyl  steroids  in  human:  Qualitative  and  quantitative   GC/MS  analysis.  J  Steroid  Biochem  Mol  Biol  1992;42:533–46.  

[36]   Edlund  PO,  Bowers  L,  Henion  J.  Determination  of  methandrostenolone  and  its   metabolites  in  equine  plasma  and  urine  by  coupled-­‐column  liquid  chromatography   with  ultraviolet  detection  and  confirmation  by  tandem  mass  spectrometry.  J   Chromatogr  B  Biomed  Sci  App  1989;487:341–56.  

[37]   Tiidus  PM,  Enns  DL.  Point:Counterpoint:  Estrogen  and  sex  do/do  not  influence  post-­‐

exercise  indexes  of  muscle  damage,  inflammation,  and  repair.  J  Appl  Physiol   2009;106:1010–2.  

[38]   Sanaullah,  Bowers  LD.  Facile  synthesis  of  [16,16,17-­‐2H3]-­‐

testosterone,  -­‐epitestosterone  and  their  glucuronides  and  sulfates.  J  Steroid   Biochem  Mol  Biol  1996;58:225–34.  

 

   

(20)

Tables  

Table  1.  Synthesis  of  steroid  sulfates  using  SPE  purification  

Entrya   Steroid  sulfate   Conversion  (%)b  

(Yield  %)c   Entrya   Steroid  sulfate   Conversion  (%)b   (Yield)c   1ad,e  

1bd,e,f  

1cd,e,f    

>98  (94)   (40)   (43)  

7ad,e   7bd,e,f  

 

>98   (63)  

2ad,e   2bd,e,f  

 

>98   (41)  

8ad,e    

 

>98    

3ad,e   3bd,e,f  

 

97   (21)  

9ad,e   9bd,e,f  

 

>98   (76)  

4ad,e   4bd,e,f  

 

>98   (54)  

10ad,e      

 

>98    

5ad,e   5bd,e,f  

 

>98   (42)  

11ad,e      

 

>98    

6ad,e   6cd,e,f  

 

>98   (55)  

12ad,e    

 

>98    

a  Steroid  sulfate  prepared  as:  a,  ammonium  salt;  b,  triethylammonium  salt;  or  c,  pyridinium  salt.    

b  Conversion  based  on  400  MHz  1H  NMR  integration.    

c  Isolated  yield  of  pure  steroid  sulfate.    

d The  400  or  600  MHz  1H  NMR  and  ESI  MS  is  provided  in  the  supporting  information.    

e  The  100  or  150  MHz  13C  NMR  spectrum  is  provided  in  the  supporting  information.    

f  Conditions:  steroid  (1  equiv),  SO3.NEt3/SO3.py  (1.1–1.6  equiv),  pyridine,  RT,  2–20  h.    

OSO3

O

O

O3SO

OSO3

O

OH

O3SO

OSO3

O H

O OH

O3SO H

H

O

O3SO H

OSO3

N

O H

O

O3SO H

OSO3

O

N H

O

O3SO H

OSO3

O

(21)

Scheme  legends  

Scheme  1.  Small  scale  synthesis  and  purification  of  steroid  sulfates.  

Scheme  2.  Small  scale  sulfation  of  estrogenic  steroids.  

 

Graphics   Scheme  1:  

   

Scheme  2:  

   

i) SO3.py (10 mg) DMF (100 µL)

1,4-dioxane (100 µL)

RT, 4 h

O

OH

ii) SPE O

OSO3NH4

1a (>98% conversion) testosterone (1 mg)

i) NaBH4

MeOH, RT, 4 h ii) SPE

i) SO3.pyridine DMF 1,4-dioxane

RT, 4 h

HO

OH

ii) SPE HO

OSO3NH4

13a (>98% conversion) i) ClSO3H

pyridine 0 °C–RT 20 h

HO

O

ii) SPE

O3SO

X

NH4

14a X,Y=O (65% conversion) 14c (25% yield)

15a X=OH, Y=H (>98% conversion)

Y

i) SO3.pyridine 180 °C 15 min

HO

O

ii) SPE

HO

O NH4O3S

16a (>98% conversion) estradiol

estrone

estrone

(22)

Graphical  abstract:  

 

   

 

i) SO3.pyridine

NH4

16 examples µg to mg scale reactions

65 to >98% conversion O

OH

ii) SPE

O

OSO3

steroid steroid sulfate

References

Related documents

C2 When selecting a site, ensure that:  the location and surrounding uses are compatible with the proposed development or use  the site is environmentally safe including risks