• No results found

South Coast Highway – Reconstruction of Fish Track Road to Manypeaks Town Section

N/A
N/A
Protected

Academic year: 2023

Share "South Coast Highway – Reconstruction of Fish Track Road to Manypeaks Town Section "

Copied!
42
0
0

Loading.... (view fulltext now)

Full text

The proposed project involves the reconstruction of 1.6 km of roadwork with some rearrangement of substandard vertical and horizontal curves to meet current standards. These works will provide an area of ​​the road network with improved alignment with appropriate seal and berm widths to accommodate growing traffic needs to meet current expectations while providing additional safety benefits to the community and industry. For the purposes of this PEIA, the section requiring realignment is the Fish Track Road to Manypeaks section, which originates from SLK, on ​​South Coast Highway (H008) in the City of Albany.

The main environmental impacts of the project include the clearing of 9000 m2 of native vegetation, within a vegetation association that has less than 30% pre-European extent. However, due to the nature and small scale of the project, impacts are not considered significant. An Aboriginal Heritage Study was completed for the proposed project in November 2008 by Brad Goode and Paul Greenfeld.

The survey revealed a new, unrecorded site located near the intersection of South Coast Highway and Homestead Road. The site was handed over to the DIA, who have advised that the submission is unlikely to be registered and will go into 'reserved records' as the site does not meet the criteria under the Aboriginal Heritage Act 1972.

BACKGROUND

DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT

P ROJECT L OCATION

METHODOLOGY

P RELIMINARY D ESKTOP S TUDY

As the project site receives more than 400 mm of annual rainfall and is not located in a vulnerable area in the southwestern parts of Western Australia, advice was not sought from DEC regarding the broad decline status of the project area, see Appendix I. DEC's acid sulfate soil map was reviewed on Shared Land Information Platform (SLIP - https://uat2.landgate.wa.gov.au/bmvf/app/waatlas/) to determine the level of risk to which the project is exposed, see Appendix K. The need for a local air quality assessment was determined using the criteria outlined in the MRWA Environmental Guideline, Air Quality.

C OMMONWEALTH R EFERRAL

S TATE R EFERRAL

EXISTING ENVIRONMENT

D ESCRIPTION

S ITE I NVESTIGATION

CLEARING OF NATIVE VEGETATION

D ETAILS OF V EGETATION A SSOCIATIONS TO BE C LEARED

A SSESSMENT A GAINST T HE C LEARING P RINCIPLES

Vegetation contains potential foraging habitat for Carnaby's cockatoos; however, the small nature and scale of the project (removal of 9,000 m2 of vegetation) is unlikely to significantly affect the foraging habitat of the listed species. One of the species recorded during the January field assessment was considered a Priority 3 species as listed by DEC, but could not be confirmed due to insufficient material. Due to the small nature and scale of the project (clearing 9000 m2 of native vegetation), the proposal is unlikely to conflict with this principle.

Native vegetation should not be cleared if the clearing of vegetation is likely to have an impact on the environmental values ​​of any adjacent or nearby conservation areas. The nature and scale of the project in the context of the reserve suggests that it is unlikely to contravene this principle. REFERENCES Biological survey by Maunsell (2009), ArcGis Map, The proposal is unlikely to contravene this Principle. i) Native vegetation should not be cleared if the clearing of vegetation is likely to cause deterioration of surface or ground water quality.

Considering the nature and extent of the clearance and the project, it is not considered to be significant. Biological survey by Maunsell (2009), ArcGis mapping, ASS risk mapping, DoW Geographic Data Atlas Database search (2011).

S UMMARY OF M ANAGEMENT A CTIONS

Acid sulfate soils have not been mapped as moderate or high risk in the project area. The extent and scale of native vegetation clearing for this proposed road improvement is not believed to cause or exacerbate the incidence or intensity of flooding. Shall the project involve eviction for purposes considered temporary in nature under Condition 13 of CPS818.

ASSESSMENT OF ASPECTS AND IMPACTS

A search of the DoW database has confirmed that the proposed works will not disturb or disrupt any natural drainage and surface runoff patterns. There are no conservation areas or reserves near the project area that will be affected. Provided that traffic management and signage to main road standards are used, none of the proposed works pose any significant risk to public safety.

Not relevant to the proposed works, the project does not require the use of hazardous substances. Pollution The works are taking place within a road reserve and no known previous land use in or adjacent to the project area has had the potential to cause pollution, e.g. A search of DEC's contaminated sites database indicates that there are no identified contaminated sites in the project area.

The proposed works are likely to take place outside the existing road reserve, requiring land excavation, but the project area is outside any local authority or regional planning area planning scheme. Sites on National Heritage A search of the inventory database of Australian Heritage Sites found no site(s) in the vicinity of the project. A search by the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities Protected Matters Search Tool found no Ramsar Wetland(s) near the project.

An investigation by the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Protected Affairs found no endangered ecological communities, 17 threatened species and no listed marine species in the vicinity of the project. Project activities are unlikely to have a significant impact on these species and the marine species are listed as “transient” where the vegetation present is unlikely to provide habitat for these species. Carnaby's Cockatoo habitat occurs in the project area, but due to the small nature and scale of the project, impacts on foraging habitat are not considered significant.

A search by the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities Protected Matters Search Tool located 8 migratory species in the vicinity of the project. It is unlikely that the project activities will have a significant impact on these species, as the vegetation present is unlikely to be habitat for these species. Commonwealth Territories The project is not located on and will not affect any Commonwealth Territories.

Table 4:  Aspects and Impacts – South Coast Highway Manypeaks section upgrade
Table 4: Aspects and Impacts – South Coast Highway Manypeaks section upgrade

DECISION TO REFER

R EFERRAL TO THE D EPARTMENT OF S USTAINABILITY , E NVIRONMENT , W ATER ,

R EFERRAL TO THE E NVIRONMENTAL P ROTECTION A UTHORITY

STAKEHOLDER CONSULTATION

OTHER APPROVALS/PERMITS/LICENCES

The project management measures defined in this EMP are in addition to the Standard Environmental Management Contract Specifications applicable to Category 2 projects. Where applicable, the Main Roads Standard Environmental Contract Specifications (Specifications and 304) should be followed. Due to the scale and nature of the project, no contingency measures have been defined as the inherent environmental risks are low.

Due to the scale and nature of the project, there is no need to audit the implementation of the EMP, as the environmental risks are low. The implementation of the EMP will be audited xx weeks after the contractor takes over the site. Control of weeds, dieback and other pathogens: .. a copy of each management plan prepared; and .. for any pathogen other than die-off, appropriate action taken.

Apply for DEC approval of the pre-clearance offset proposal as required by Condition 15 b) of the purpose permit. Vegetation clearance Ensure that the overall objectives of the route and construction works are compatible with maintaining and, where possible, enhancing the biological integrity of the surrounding environment and minimizing vegetation loss. This vegetation will be used during any remedial works and will either be mulched or re-scattered in accordance with the TDP/remediation plan.

If clearing takes place in terms of Main Roads purpose permit (CPS818), ensure compliance with Section 14 of the permit in relation to Dieback, other pathogen and weed control. Pedestrian access must be planned and implemented prior to the construction of works. Contractor Main Roads Any complaints regarding dust will be dealt with as soon as possible.

Watering, the use of hydromulch or other forms of mulch to protect loose surfaces should be used as mitigation measures. Contractor Main Roads The designated service area will be bundled to contain any spills or leaks. Construction Pollution and Litter Ensure that the construction of the proposal is managed to a standard that minimizes any adverse impacts on the environment.

All waste oil will be collected for recycling and any empty fuel/oil containers, used filters and waste hydraulic parts will be collected and stored in a designated area and then removed to an approved location. Project areas, including hard standing areas, will be maintained in an orderly manner at all times. Contractor Main Routes A water tanker/firefighting unit will be on site at all times.

Contractor's Main Roads Site offices and material storage areas will be located on the previous contractor's main roads.

Figure

Figure 1 – Project Location and Study Area
Figure 2. Clearing location and area.
Table 1:  Vegetation Description, Condition and Percent Remaining
Table 3:  Summary of Additional Management Actions  Impact of Clearing  Yes/No
+4

References

Related documents

When the contribution that conservation actions can make to staff satisfaction are considered in the context of a the skill recruitment and retention problems of the tourism industry b