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Visual Art 2019 v1.1

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Introduction

Rationale

The key ideas of making and responding identified in the P-10 Australian Curriculum: The Arts continue in the senior curriculum across The Arts learning area. A course of study in visual arts can form the basis for further education and employment in the field of art, design, craft and information technology; wider areas of creative industries and cultural institutions; and different fields that use skills inherent in the profession.

Learning area structure

Course structure

Teaching and learning

  • Syllabus objectives
  • Underpinning factors
  • Aboriginal perspectives and Torres Strait Islander perspectives
  • Pedagogical and conceptual frameworks
  • Subject matter

These aspects of numeracy knowledge and skills are embedded in the syllabus objectives, unit objectives and subject materials, and ISMGs for Visual Art. Core learning in Visual Art units is organized into the inquiry learning processes of development, research, reflection and solution.

Figure 3: The relationship between inquiry learning, objectives and subject matter in  Visual Art
Figure 3: The relationship between inquiry learning, objectives and subject matter in Visual Art

Assessment — general information

Formative assessments — Units 1 and 2

Summative assessments — Units 3 and 4

Where a performance level has a range of two marks, it must be decided whether the best fit is the higher or lower grade of the range. Schools and teachers must have strategies in place to ensure that the work submitted for internal summative assessment is the student's own.

Reporting standards

The learner creates and responds to the realization of an idea by identifying the visual language in works of art as he acquires and understands information. The student applies analytical procedures using terminology to identify works of art and to recognize the context in works of art.

Unit objectives

They explore how artists go through processes to create new ways of thinking, meaning and representation. As artists, they think of how different lenses can accurately filter or distort the point of view, and through these lenses they communicate how they look at and react to the world.

Area of study: Developing

Area of study: Researching

Area of study: Reflecting

Area of study: Resolving

Assessment guidance

In Unit 2, students explore the concept of 'art as code' to learn how visual language is able to express complex ideas. Although both spoken language and visual language vary by culture, visual language has the potential to transcend and communicate across cultures, time and geography. They use a range of materials, techniques, processes and technologies to make works of art that can be ephemeral or permanent, physical or digital.

As an audience, students examine art practices, reading and interpreting artworks by Australian and international artists who make innovative use of cross-cultural meaning and communication through visual language. Suggestions for relevant artists and works of art that can serve as examples, case studies and incentives are incorporated into the subject matter.

Unit objectives

Students apply contexts, foregrounding formal and cultural context to analyze and interpret visual communication and meaning in works of art. As students make and respond, teachers break down the art processes of creating a piece of work. Students use a range of materials, techniques and processes to create a folio, including experimental work, artistic research and at least one solved artwork.

Through the inquiry learning process, students explore how visual language, symbol systems, and art conventions can express ideas and feelings in images, objects, and experiences. As artists, students communicate fluently and expressively through visual forms and engage with audiences to express their ideas.

Area of study: Developing

Area of study: Researching

Area of study: Reflecting

Area of study: Resolving

Assessment guidance

Unit description

Unit objectives

Area of study: Developing

Area of study: Researching

Area of study: Reflecting

Area of study: Resolving

Assessment

Summative internal assessment 1 (IA1): Investigation — inquiry

Experimental artworks are included to support individual interpretation of researched art practices and are presented using methods appropriate to the mode of delivery.

Summative internal assessment 2 (IA2): Project — inquiry phase 2

Summative external assessment (EA): Examination (25%)

Students tackle their work with the concept of "art as an alternative" as they imagine, create and use new ideas and connections. At the same time, they select from personal, cultural and formal contexts to examine and compare the visual language, expression and communication of multiple meanings in different art forms. Students identify alternative representations or extensions of their ideas by reflecting on their work from Unit 3 and thinking about how exploiting existing approaches or applying new knowledge and skills can enrich the meaning of their work.

As an audience, students consider how alternative methods of display and exhibition, modern approaches to materials and new technologies affect the sensory experience and engagement with art. They evaluate how alternative approaches in a work can develop and expand the communication of meaning and fully realize artistic intentions.

Unit objectives

Area of study: Developing

Area of study: Researching

Area of study: Reflecting

Area of study: Resolving

Assessment

Summative internal assessment 3 (IA3): Project — inquiry phase 3

Summative external assessment (EA): Examination (25%)

The student work has the following characteristics: Marks. realization of a refined body of work through synthesis of concept and contemporary. context that yields alternative meaning and a developed personal aesthetic 11–12. realization of a refined body of work through synthesis of knowledge and focus which. increases meaning and audience engagement 9–10. application of literacy skills in artist statement(s) that invite a dialogue between artist and audience about the intended meaning. realization of an individualized body of work through sustained inquiry and informed use of media, processes and approaches to achieve ends that express new meaning. application of literacy skills that communicate concept and focus in an artist's statement. realization of a body of work through an investigation that communicates artistic purpose and. applying literacy skills to describe concept. realization of a visual response that communicates ideas 3–4. use of terminology to identify works of art. does not meet any of the descriptions above. justify a position supported by evidence of artistic processes, intentions and expression 8. realize a written response to demonstrate knowledge about how artists employ artistic. Students are expected to analyze, interpret, evaluate and justify information in developing an answer to an unseen question in a written mode. The extended response exam requires:. an answer to an unseen question chosen from multiple options and unseen stimulus. sustained analysis, interpretation, evaluation and justification to fully answer a question. an answer in the form of an analytical essay expressing a point of view.

Time: 2 hours plus 20 minutes planning time. the unseen stimulus will be concise enough to allow students enough time to engage with it. students will be provided with contextual information during the exam to support their understanding of the stimulus. Queensland Curriculum & Assessment Authority General Higher Curriculum. highly skilled or trained for a specific activity; perfected in knowledge or training; an expert. the condition or quality of being true, correct, or accurate; without errors or omissions; accuracy or precision; correctness; in science, the extent to which a measurement result represents the quantity it purports to measure; an accurate measurement result includes an estimate of the true value and an estimate of the uncertainty. precisely accurate and precise; to the point; in accordance with or exactly. conformity to truth, standard, rule, model, convention or known facts; without errors or omissions; accurate; correct in every detail skilful very/highly skilled or proficient in something; an expert. adequate satisfactory or acceptable in quality or quantity equal to the requirement or occasion. considerations within the visual arts that are usually associated with the sense of sight; a visual image or an object is perceived spatially with recognized associations to form and context; the form of a work can be subject to aesthetics as much as its content. dissect to identify and examine component parts and/or their relationships; dissect or examine to identify essential elements, properties, components or structure; determining the logic and reasonableness of the information; to examine or think about something in order to explain and interpret it, with the aim of finding meaning or relationships and recognizing patterns, similarities and differences. the acquisition and application of knowledge, understanding and skills in a real-life or real-life context, which may include workplace, industry and community situations; emphasizes learning through practice and includes both theory and application of theory, linking subject knowledge and understanding to the development of practical skills. a course whose primary focus is work and vocational education; emphasizes applied learning and community connections;. a subject for which QCAA has developed a curriculum with the following characteristics: subject outcomes developed from applied curricula contribute to QCE; results can contribute to ATAR calculations. apply knowledge and understanding of application in response to a given situation or circumstance; perform or apply a procedure in a given or specific situation. to estimate assess the value, importance, or status of something; judge or reflect on a text or work. appreciate recognize or judge the worth or value of something; fully understand; understand all the implications. approaches to defined processes or theories for creating art and/or responding to works of art. properly acceptable; suitable or suitable for a particular purpose, circumstance, context, etc. suitable for a purpose or occasion; appropriate, appropriate field of study department or department within a unit. to argue give reasons for or against something; to challenge or debate a question or idea; to convince, prove, or attempt to prove by citing the reasons of artistic convention established procedures that artists use for representation or organization. ideas, convey meaning and create aesthetic value, articulately presented with clarity and efficiency. artistic practices refer to the techniques, skills and processes that students and artists develop to create their artwork; and for work in the art industry. artistic processes see "exploratory learning". artist's statement a short written text accompanying the display of the artwork; helps the viewer understand the purpose or motives behind the artwork; interpretive rather than descriptive. an aspect of a particular part of a characteristic of something; an aspect, phase, or part of a whole. evaluate measure, determine, evaluate, rate or judge the value, quality, results, results, size, importance, nature or scope of something. assessment purposeful and systematic collection of information about student achievements. assessment instrument a tool or device used to collect information about student achievement. assessment objectives derived from unit objectives and contextualised to the requirements of the assessment instrument. see also "curriculum objectives", "unit objectives"). Myers, P 2015, In the push for marketable skills, are we forgetting the beauty and poetry of STEM disciplines?, http://theconversation.com/in-the-push-for-marketable-skills-are-we-forgetting- beauty-in- poetry-discipline-stems-45085.

Figure

Figure 1: Learning area structure
Figure 2 outlines the structure of this course of study.
Figure 3: The relationship between inquiry learning, objectives and subject matter in  Visual Art
Figure 4: Course components in Visual Art

References

Related documents

These broad learning outcomes indicate that students will: • understand, develop and communicate ideas and information • access, analyse, evaluate and use information from a variety