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| Massey University | April 2012 | definingnz | 1 www.definingnz.com

April 2012

Massey University School of Aviation, celebrating 25 years of serving the

global aviation industry

M as se y

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2 | definingnz | April 2012 | Massey University

fuelling confidence air

It’s what we do on the ground that helps you in the air.

At Air BP, we know you love to fly. That’s why we go that bit further to get you off the ground – from your local Account Manager to the trained refueller who fills your plane at one of our eighty locations across the country. At Air BP, it’s what we do on the ground that helps you in the air.

BP_A4_Service_1.indd 1 1/6/06 10:18:22 AM

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| Massey University | April 2012 | definingnz | 1

CONTENTS

COVER STORY

8 Silver Jubilee

This year Massey University School of Aviation celebrates 25 years of producing “aviators with a difference”. We revisit some of the School’s milestones with pictures from the past and present.

WOMEN IN AVIATION

6 PhD student wins award

Doctoral student and former Massey flight instructor Tahlia Fisher has been recognised for her contribution to aviation safety in New Zealand.

6 Mum of four has management in her sights Juggling family and study can be a tricky business, but Analena Siu is proof that it can be done. She now has her Postgraduate Diploma in Aviation – but hasn’t finished with study yet.

7 Meet the next generation

Bernie McGuire is one of the up-and-coming female aviators currently studying at Massey. She has her sights set on competitive aerobatics and already has the Briar Smith Trophy under her belt.

PHOTO STORIES

10 Wings ceremonies

Getting your Wings is a time to celebrate. We relive that special moment with a selection of photos from Wings ceremonies from the past few years.

12 Tools of trade

Get inside a Diamond DA40 airplane and see its state-of- the-art Garmin 1000 cockpit display.

PARTNERSHIPS

4 University signs partnership with Air NZ

Aviation students at Massey will now be among the first in line for commercial airline pilot jobs with Air New Zealand.

4 Airways brings international students to Massey After the Canterbury earthquakes, Airways established a training facility for a group of its international students at the Massey University campus. Now it’s hosting a steady stream of international clients.

16 Massey broadens student base in Singapore The latest joint initiative with the Singapore Aviation Academy will allow graduates of Singapore Polytechnics to study at Massey for a semester.

PROFILES

5 Local ‘spiderman’ saving lives

Massey graduate James McCarthy can claim to be saving lives. That’s because his invention, the “spider”, greatly improves your chances of survival after a plane crash.

11 Essay secures top scholarship

Murtaza Telya, who completed a Bachelor of Aviation Management at Massey, has won the prestigious Rudolf Kapustin Memorial Scholarship.

14 Chief flight examiner wins excellence award Dr Ritchie de Montalk has received the Captain Greg Vujcich Award for his work mentoring and inspiring young aviators.

14 Industry honours navigation specialist

Squadron Leader Hugh Francis, who recently retired as a senior tutor at the School of Aviation, has been honoured by the Royal Aeronautical Society.

15 Massey leads the way in safety training

Deputy chief flight instructor Paul Kearney explains why threat and error management was integrated into the School of Aviation’s training programme.

15 Meet the chief flight instructor

Chief flight instructor Craig Whyte talks about his first job, studying at Massey, and his 1967 Mustang.

definingnz - School of Aviation Silver Jubilee special edition

Published by Massey University – www.massey.ac.nz

Editors: Sidah Russell and Kathryn Farrow

Writers: Kathryn Farrow, Sidah Russell, Lana Simmons-Donaldson, Josie Brennan

Design : Grant Bunyan

fuelling confidence air

It’s what we do on the ground that helps you in the air.

At Air BP, we know you love to fly. That’s why we go that bit further to get you off the ground – from your local Account Manager to the trained refueller who fills your plane at one of our eighty locations across the country. At Air BP, it’s what we do on the ground that helps you in the air.

BP_A4_Service_1.indd 1 1/6/06 10:18:22 AM

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2 | definingnz | April 2012 | Massey University

SPONSORS’ PAGE

Massey University School of Aviation would like to thank the following sponsors for their support in helping us to celebrate 25 years of producing ‘aviators with a difference’.

Air BP is the specialised aviation division of BP, one of the world’s major energy companies. It is one of the world’s largest suppliers of aviation fuels (both Jet Kerosene and Aviation Gasoline) and lubricants (for both turbine and piston-engined aircraft), currently supplying over 26 million tonnes of aviation fuels and lubricants to customers across the globe each year. Air BP is represented at over 600 airports in 50 countries, and we have a local New Zealand office to service our customers in this country. This combination of local representation with a global organisation enables us to focus on our relationships with our partners, be they customers, airport operators, or other third parties. Building strong relationships helps us to understand the specific needs of our customers in New Zealand so we can seek out innovative and flexible solutions to meet their specific requirements. As part of the wider BP Group, we can draw upon the company’s wealth of experience in project consultancy and financing, procurement services, research and laboratory centres, training and emergency response. In addition, we can also provide technical services and engineering consultancy to our partners. Advert – Inside front cover.

Who We Are: Our 750 staff provide air traffic control and technical services, surveillance, communication, flight inspection, mapping and airspace design expertise. We are based in New Zealand and we also deliver products and services around the world. In absolute simple terms, Airways is responsible for avoiding aircraft collisions in the air and on the ground. We achieve this through the control of all domestic and international air traffic travelling within NZ’s Flight Information Region (FIR) which totals 30 million square kms – one of the largest areas of airspace in the world.

Specialised Training: From selection to graduation, Airways has a reputation for delivering world- class training products and services. We specialise in international Air Traffic Control and Maintenance Engineering training. We take a ‘training for success’ approach and our delivery is supported by a range of proven training products and services – including aerodrome and radar simulation, i-learn computer-based training and Aviation English. Advert – Inside back cover.

How you appear will engender confidence in you as a capable operator and you can look like a professional by wearing a smart uniform suitable for your vocation. Just like you trust a policeman with your security, a well-dressed pilot will inspire trust in their passengers and crew. Arrow Uniforms has ahuge range of uniforms available with industry leading quality and value built in. Give us a call on 050 UNIFORM (0508 643 676) or visit our website, www.arrowuniforms.co.nz. Advert – p.5

The CAA is responsible for enabling a safe airspace environment for all commercial and recreational aviation activity, and protecting the public interest through a reliable and responsive aviation regulatory system.

We contribute to national airspace and aviation system policy development; develop rules and standards that are clear, timely and internationally aligned; and regularly review the civil aviation system to promote improved safety and security. The CAA works with individual participants in the aviation community to provide support through education and information; controls entry into and exit from the system through certification; monitors safety performance and compliance with standards; investigates and analyses accidents and incidents; and undertakes corrective action and enforcement. Advert – p.7

Palmerston North International Airport is identified as NZPM and PMR; Air traffic control services provided by Airways Corporation of New Zealand; Very good weather characteristics for aviation; Seven days a week, 24 hours a day operation; The airport is only five kilometres north-east of the city central area; The main sealed runway length is 1,902m; Grass runway length is 608m; Training site for pilots and air traffic controllers; The central hub for all things on the move - freight, cargo and passengers. Advert – p.11

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| Massey University | April 2012 | definingnz | 3

WELCOME

“The vision for Massey University School of Aviation

is to establish a Centre of Excellence for Aviation Education,

Research and Training in Palmerston North,

along with other partners.”

Ashok Poduval CEO of Massey University

School of Aviation

spend one semester studying in New Zealand at Massey University and complete the remainder of the degree through study in Singapore.

Strong partnerships and improving connections with the aviation industry is another strategic direction for the School. We have recently been selected as a Preferred Flight Training Organisation by Air New Zealand in a partnership arrangement. This means our graduates will be placed in a pool of “tagged” pilots for preferential employment with Air New Zealand.

There is increased cooperation with Airways, which is jointly delivering a training programme with the School for air traffic control trainees from China.

Discussions have also been completed with Jeppesen GmbH, Germany, a subsidiary of Boeing Airplane Company, for participating in joint research ventures, and we are in the final stages of negotiating a formal agreement.

The vision for Massey University School of Aviation is to establish a Centre of Excellence for Aviation Education, Research and Training in Palmerston North along with other partners, such as Airways. It would bring together the educational, research, and training expertise of the School and our industry partners, and create synergies to give us a global presence in the aviation industry.

I look forward to flying Massey University School of Aviation to greater heights with support and assistance from the dedicated team of aviation academics and professionals at the School.

his is a milestone year for Massey University and the School of Aviation.

The School is proud of its record of producing

“aviators with a difference” for the past 25 years and I would like to thank all those who have supported the School during these years and contributed to our success.

The School has certainly come a long way since the Massey Aviation Institute commenced in 1987 with 28 students with a unique concept of combining a flight training programme and a tertiary education qualification.

Over the years, this grew into the Bachelor of Aviation – Air Transport Pilot major. This is an undergraduate degree that has a commercial pilot licence and multi-engine instrument rating, with Air Transport Pilot credits, incorporated as an integrated programme.

We t h e n i n t ro d u c e d t h e Bachelor of Aviation Management, Master of Aviation, and a Doctoral qualification in aviation. In recent years we have graduated students with a PhD in aviation.

The School of Aviation is now focused on expanding its international relationships. We have a long-standing relationship with the Singapore Aviation Academy, through whom we offer both our undergraduate and postgraduate aviation programmes in Singapore.

There is a recent initiative to enrol graduates from polytechnic institutes in Singapore into the Bachelor of Aviation Management programme.

Through this special arrangement they will

T

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4 | definingnz | April 2012 | Massey University

University signs partnership with Air New Zealand

Aviation students at Massey University will be among the first in line for commercial airline pilot jobs with Air New Zealand thanks to a partnership agreement.

The School of Aviation was selected to partner with the national airline’s training institute launched in April last year.

The appointment followed a rigorous assessment of flight training organisations by Air New Zealand to validate the University’s current programme and reflects its high quality and standards.

Students who successfully complete

the Bachelor of Aviation programme will be among Air New Zealand’s preferred candidates for first officer positions when the airline is recruiting.

School of Aviation chief executive Ashok Poduval says the Bachelor of Aviation prog ramme offer s competency-based initial flight training tailored to the requirements of Air New Zealand. Graduates from the programme will form a pool of candidates who will enjoy preferred status during recruitment by Air New Zealand.

“Massey University School of Aviation is proud to be a collaboration

partner with Air New Zealand,” he says. “This partnership will enhance the quality of flight training in New Zealand and provide a pathway for pilots from initial training to air transport qualification.”

Air New Zealand’s Aviation Institute is an initiative by Air New Zealand to increase training opportunities for pilots, engineers, flights attendants and frontline check-in staff. The University is one of five training partners involved.

Airways brings international students to Massey

After the Canterbury earthquakes, Airways established a satellite training facility for a group of its international students at the Massey University campus. Now the refurbished training facility is hosting a steady stream of international clients.

Airways had only just secured a multi-year contract to train Saudi Arabian air traffic controllers when the September 4, 2010 earthquake rocked the region. Its Saudi students remained in the city, but the subsequent deadly quake in February 2011 saw them return to Saudi Arabia with no immediate prospect of their return.

Airways was able to entice the students back to New Zealand by securing space in the heart of the School of Aviation, and has since managed to grow its international business.

Five students from Tianjin University in China are currently undertaking an Air Traffic Control Programme in conjunction with Massey University. The group will be at the Manawatu campus from June until August 2012 to study air traffic control safety analysis and management, airspace planning, aviation regulation, and aircraft performance engineering.

Another group of 27 Saudi Arabian students are part way through a one-year air traffic control course in Palmerston North, and will use Massey’s simulators and gain flight deck experience in the University’s Diamond 42 aircraft.

Airways also has 11 students from Hong Kong currently at its Palmerston North training facilities working towards a private pilot licence and studying aviation English, air law, meteorology, navigation, and aerodrome radar control.

“The original reason we shifted part of our operation to Palmerston North was because of the Christchurch earthquake, but new opportunities have arisen as a result of the move,” says Airways General Manager of Training Sharon Cooke.

“Being in partnership with Massey makes our training programmes very attractive to international clients. The other unexpected outcome was that students really enjoy their time in Palmerston North so both the students and their employers are happy. This is definitely a partnership we intend to pursue and develop in the future.”

Part of Airways’ training facilities in Palmerston North

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| Massey University | April 2012 | definingnz | 5

WHEN YOU’VE GOT THE LOOK, YOU’VE GOT

THE TRUST

Call 050 UNIFORM (0508 643 676) now to contact Arrow Uniforms or visit www.arrowuniforms.co.nz Arrow Uniforms congratulates Massey School of Aviation on their fi rst 25 years. We look forward to keeping you looking good for the next 25!

First impressions count. Creating the right atmosphere by dressing like a professional will inspire your clients with confi dence by how you appear and help you succeed anywhere.

WHEN YOU’VE GOT THE LOOK, YOU’VE GOT

THE TRUST

MSOAJ121

Local ‘spiderman’ saving lives

James McCarthy has the title “spiderman” on his business card – and he can claim to be saving lives. That’s because the Massey University engineering graduate invented a product that greatly improves your chances of survival after a plane crash.

Called a “spider”, his invention relays an aircraft’s GPS position in real-time to the spidertracks website. If something

goes wrong, the aircraft can be found fast, based on its last reported position.

Spidertracks didn’t invent tracking. What it invented was a simple and effective way of tracking flight movements in real time, for both commercial and recreational pilots. Spiders are cheaper and easier to install than the old technology, which relied on the box surviving the crash to send out an SOS.

After Mr McCarthy studied mechatronics at Massey School of Engineering and Advanced Technology, he started working for local pilot Don Sandbrook. Mr Sandbrook didn’t want to share the fate of a high profile businessman whose helicopter crashed in 2005, but wasn’t found for a fortnight because its transmitter failed on impact.

So he tasked his new employee with finding a better alternative. The result was the spider – a portable device, which could be plugged into the plane’s cigarette lighter. It relays the plane’s location constantly to the internet so, even if the box doesn’t survive the crash, the information does.

Since then, the Spidertracks brand has gone from strength to strength. The company now sells into more than 65 countries and the little black units can be found in aircraft all over the world, including the fleet of Diamind DA 40 aircraft at Massey University School of Aviation.

James McCarthy with his ‘spider’ in action

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6 | definingnz | April 2012 | Massey University

Mother of four has

management in her sights

PhD student wins award to improve aviation safety

A doctoral student and former flight instructor at Massey University has won an award to support her contribution to aviation safety in New Zealand.

Tahlia Fisher was presented with the inaugural Ian Diamond Award by the Royal Aeronautical Society, which is worth $3,000 towards her PhD study.

Ms Fisher graduated from the School of Aviation in 2001 with a Bachelor of Aviation majoring in flight crew development, completed a Postgraduate Diploma in Aviation with distinction and worked at the Milson Flight Systems Centre training young pilots.

During her studies, she developed a keen interest in aviation safety matters and assisted the Transport

Air Investigation Commission with accident investigations.

She joined Air New Zealand four years ago and now works as a senior safety specialist based at Auckland International Airport. She has been involved in investigations into the use of incorrect take-off performance data, a heavy landing in Brisbane, an inadvertent slide deployment, a flight departing with insufficient fuel, and a high speed rejected take-off in Narita.

Ms Fisher, of Titirangi in Auckland, will now combine her career with PhD research at Massey University into effective communication between pilots and maintenance engineers and the way this affects airline operations.

Frank Sharp, School of Aviation professional programmes manager, who nominated Ms Fisher for the award, says this is an important area of research for the aviation industry and her work will add to the body of knowledge.

“While it is suspected that ineffective communication between these two groups can have negative consequences with regard to safe and efficient airline operations, there is no empirical data to support this theory,” Mr Sharp says.

“Tahlia’s research proposes to undertake a series of studies within an airline environment following an inductive pattern of inquiry with a view to better understand both the nature in which pilots and engineers interact, and the way in which this affects airline operations.”

Ms Fisher’s supervisors at Massey are Dr Ross St George and Dr Ritchie de Montalk of the School of Aviation.

This was the inaugural award of the Ian Diamond award, which is made to an aviation professional wishing to pursue higher academic study that is relevant to the industry in New Zealand. It is in memory of Mr Diamond, a former Air New Zealand chief engineer who supported the education and ongoing career progression of young New Zealanders in the aviation industry.

School of Aviation professional programmes manager Frank Sharp with award recipient Tahlia Fisher and manager of aviation safety Dr Ritchie de Montalk.

Juggling family and study can be a tricky business, but former cabin crew supervisor Analena Siu is proof that it can be done. Mrs Siu graduated with a Postgraduate Diploma in

Aviation in May 2010 and, even though she has four children to manage, she still has plans to complete her Masters degree.

Mrs Sui began her working life as a teacher, before taking to the skies as a cabin crew supervisor for six years at Royal Tongan Airlines, and then for Fly Niu Airline, and Peau Vava’u Ltd. At this point, she decided to undertake formal aviation management training at Massey’s Manawatu campus.

She began studying towards a Bachelor of Aviation Management degree in 2006; at the same time she was expecting her third child. “My first semester in 2006 was most challenging for me. I had been away from the classroom as a learner for eight years, so it was very difficult to keep up with the readings and study guide.”

Despite the challenges she graduated in 2008 and began her postgraduate study. Now, with that under her belt and having had her fourth child, she is back at Massey studying part time towards a Bachelor of Arts with a major in Japanese.

“My plan for the future is to work in the aviation industry and with the skills and experience I gain make my way up the managerial ladder,” she says. “I also have plans to complete my Masters degree.”

WOMEN IN AVIATION

Analena Siu at her graduation in 2010

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| Massey University | April 2012 | definingnz | 7

Bernie McGuire: Meet the next generation

Working With the

Aviation Community

VACUUM

W

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S E

21 24

30 33

15 12

3

6

SET

DIRECTION IND

ICATOR

www.caa.govt.nz

Promoting Aviation Safety and Security

Tell us about winning the Briar Smith Trophy.

The examiner idles the engine (simulating failure) and you have to glide the aeroplane into a paddock and land on a spot-landing grid. It was a real buzz! I was sweating with nerves.

It’s exciting because you only have one shot – if you end up too high or low on the final approach you have to put full power on and you’re out of the

Currently in her third year of her Bachelor of Aviation – Air Transport Pilot, 20-year-old Bernie McGuire has her sights set on competitive aerobatics.

She has also been accepted into this year’s flight instructor’s course, was one of the first in her class to achieve her multi engine instrument rating, and is proud to be “holding her own” with the boys. Oh, and she also won the Briar Smith Trophy – against an experienced field of female jet pilots and flight instructors.

competition. I think I was one of the least experienced pilots, so I really think I had a bit of beginner’s luck!

When did you first know you wanted to fly?

Ever since I was 12 years old and my uncle took for me for a flight in his Beaver MK-1 over the Coromandel.

Best flight of my life! It’s inspiring, the freedom you get from being in the air, and the views are indescribable.

What’s your aviation dream?

To teach other passionate new aviators to fly, and to learn aerobatics, eventually

getting to a level where I can compete at air shows. My hero is Dee Bond, a family friend from home who is a pilot of a Catalina, an amphibious aeroplane.

I owe my competition flying dream to her. She competes across the world in air races, something I’d like to do one day.

Where would we find you when you’re not up in a plane?

I’m rarely chilling out – I have far too much energy to burn! So I do a bit of volunteer surf lifesaving, I go surfing when I can, swimming, running, and a bit of study too so I can keep my conscientious instructor happy.

Bernie McGuire putting in the hours on the flight simulator

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8 | definingnz | April 2012 | Massey University

The Massey Aviation Institute opened in 1987 with 28 students on the first course. This year there are nearly 400 students studying at the School of Aviation - 248 are working towards a Bachelor of Aviation Management, 124 are studying for a Bachelor of Aviation – Air

Massey University School of Aviation, celebrating 25 years of serving the global aviation industry

SILVER JUBILEE

8 | defining | April 2012 | Massey University

Transport Pilot, 21 are pursuing postgraduate degrees, and six are undertaking PhDs. The school’s graduates are now employed as pilots, air safety investigators, airport managers, flight dispatchers, and aviation consultants all over the world.

Current School of Aviation staff, proud to be celebrating 25 years of service.

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| Massey University | April 2012 | definingnz | 9

Milestones

1987

Massey Aviation Institute is launched. An Australian company provides the training for the 28 students who enrol on Massey Course Number 1.

1990

Massey Aviation Institute becomes the Massey School of Aviation. A Diploma in Aviation is established and the School moves to a refurbished facility on the Manawatu campus.

1993

Indonesia-based Garuda Airline signs a three-year contract under which the School will train cadets for the Bachelor of Aviation degree and convert flight engineers to Commercial Pilot Licence level.

1994

A four-year Bachelor of Aviation degree is approved by the Committee on University Academic Programmes.

Some 67 Massey graduates receive internships with Garuda Airlines, based in Jakarta, operating as First Officers with B-737-400 aircraft for two years.

1995

The School moves from the ‘rusty old hangar’ at Milson to the present purpose built Milson Flight Systems Centre at Palmerston North Airport.

Contract signed with Xiamen Airlines in China to train courses to Commercial Pilot Licence level until 2002.

1996

Flight Instructor Courses commenced annually.

Postgraduate programmes formalised.

Massey Air Transport Pilot Licence programme is recognised by Singapore Civil Aviation Authority for pre-validation of licences for Singaporean Bachelor of Aviation students.

1998

School moves its headquarters and academic unit to the Albany campus.

Ardmore Flight Systems Centre is set up for pilot training and Bachelor of Aviation students attend lectures on the Albany campus.

Palmerston North Bachelor of Aviation programme and Milson Flight Systems Centre remain active. With two operating sites, the School becomes the largest flight training organisation in the Southern Hemisphere.

The School buys Spidertracks tracking system units developed by Don Sanbrook and Massey mechatronics graduate James McCarthy to combat radar blackspots.

Schools fleet of single-engine aircraft now permanently fitted with this safety device.

2001-02

Two courses for 43 students held at Ardmore to instrument rating level for the China Aviation Flying College.

2002

Bachelor of Aviation Management introduced.

Flight Crew Development major of Bachelor of Aviation restructured into four parts, renamed Air Transport Pilot major and compressed funding to enable the four parts to be completed in three years approved by Tertiary Education Commission.

Bachelor of Aviation Management offered in Singapore through the Singapore Aviation Academy.

2003-4

Headquarters return to Aviation Way in Palmerston North with closure of Ardmore Flight Systems Centre.

2005

Captain Ashok Poduval appointed General Manager.

2006

Headquarters and Academic Unit moved to the Social Science Tower on the Manawatu campus. Albany aviation offices closed.

2007

Dmitri Zotov becomes the School’s first aviation PhD graduate.

Tertiary Education Minister, now Massey Vice-Chancellor, Steve Maharey opens the new Frasca Truflite flight simulator.

2009

Fleet of 12 Diamond DA-40 and two DA-42 aircraft purchased at cost of $8million to replace the Piper Warrior (PA-28) and Seneca (PA-34).

First Massey Bachelor of Aviation – Air Transport Pilot graduates inducted into the Jet Star pilot internship programme as first officers.

2011

Air New Zealand announces School to be a training partner. The School of Aviation has 326 students are taking the Bachelor of Aviation Management programme and 130 are studying the Bachelor of Aviation – Air Transport Pilot degree. There are 37 postgraduate students and six PhD students.

| Massey University | April 2012 | defining | 9

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10 | definingnz | April 2012 | Massey University

Getting your Wings is a time to celebrate

Each year the School of Aviation celebrates the latest group of students to get their Wings at a special ceremony.

The Wings insignia is presented to all students who successfully complete the Bachelor of Aviation – Air Transport Pilot, thereby gaining their commercial pilots’ licence.

WINGS CEREMONIES

10 | definingnz | April 2012 | Massey University

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| Massey University | April 2012 | definingnz | 11

Proud Supporter of the Massey University School of Aviation 25

th

Jubilee.

Where tomorrow’s Rotary & Fixed Wing Pilots and Airways Controllers are trained.

Gateway to the region for half a million passengers annually.

The central hub for all things on the move, freight, cargo and passengers.

Our unique geographic location provides a strategic advantage for all industries.

We are future-focused, support aviation training, and the future site of the Aviation Centre of Excellence.

Be part of our exciting future. Direct your business development enquiries to Commercial Manager Greg Kent.

06 351 4415 or [email protected]

Palmerston North Airport

Air safety essay secures top scholarship

An aviation student’s essay on the challenges facing air safety investigators secured him a top scholarship.

Murtaza Telya, who completed a Bachelor of Aviation Management at the School of Aviation, was awarded the prestigious International Society of Air Safety Investigators Rudolf Kapustin Memorial Scholarship.

Mr Telya’s winning words addressed the effects on accident investigations of cultural factors, detrimental media coverage and judicial and legal duress.

As part of his 2009 scholarship, he received membership of the society (named in honour of a long-serving American air crash investigator who died in 2002).

Mr Telya explained that culture impacts on the methods of accident

investigation because Eastern cultures use a holistic approach to investigate accidents – trying to understand how casual factors interact with each other – while Western cultures use a more individualistic approach, looking at patterns of explanation.

He also outlined how media attention can be a problem for investigators, by revealing details of a crash before the official report is complete. He describes how legal pressures to criminalise aviation accidents can discourage people from providing information that could incriminate them.

The scholarship is awarded to full-time students enrolled in an International Society of Air Safety Investigators-recognised education programme.

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12 | definingnz | April 2012 | Massey University

TOOLS OF TRADE

Diamond DA40 G1000 Cockpit

Massey University School of Aviation has invested in a fleet of two high-performance twin-engine Diamond Aircraft DA42 and 12 DA40 single-engine planes to keep the school at the forefront of pilot training in New Zealand. It is the first flight training organisation in New Zealand with an entire fleet of aircraft that have state- of-the-art Garmin 1000 cockpit display systems to enhance safety and improve training quality.

12 | defining | April 2012 | Massey University

Primary flight display: This is a modern instrument that shows flight information on an LCD in a compact display, simplifying the cockpit layout.

It makes precise speed, direction and altitude measurements and displays the data for the pilot in a readable format.

Electronic navigational instrument:

Information from two ground-based navigational aids (VOR and ILS) and a dual GPS system (that relies on navigational satellites) is displayed on the primary flight display. Along with the moving map display, this information helps the pilot navigate when flying through cloud.

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| Massey University | April 2012 | definingnz | 13

| Massey University | April 2012 | defining | 13 Moving map GPS display: This displays

alongside the engine instrumentation on the multi-function LCD display. The moving map can be replaced or overlaid with other data, including system information, waypoint information, weather sensor data, airport maps and information, terrain proximity, and the position of other aircraft.

Digital engine display: This instrument displays such things as engine RPM, manifold pressure, oil temperature, cylinder head temperature, exhaust gas temperature, and the fuel level in each tank. The data is displayed to the pilot on the multi-function LCD display.

Flight planning controls: The desired flight plan can be entered into the navigation system and displayed visually on the primary flight display. This allows the pilot to maintain greater situational awareness and enhance safety.

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14 | definingnz | April 2012 | Massey University

Dr Ritchie de Montalk, who won the Captain Greg Vujcich Memorial Award, with student Nick Jenkins. (Photo courtesy of Daniel Talbot)

The School of Aviation’s chief flight examiner has won an award for excellence in general aviation instruction and his contribution to the industry.

Dr Ritchie de Montalk received the Captain Greg Vujcich Memorial Award for his work mentoring and inspiring young aviators. He was presented with the award at the New Zealand Airline Pilots’ Association conference dinner.

Since joining Massey University in 1990 the former Royal New Zealand Air Force pilot has applied himself to academic research and has gained a Bachelor of Aviation, a Master of Aviation with honours, and a Doctor of Philosophy awarded for the thesis Developing Proficiency in Air Transport Pilots: The Case for the Introduction of Non-Technical skills in Basic Pilot Training Programmes.

He is an advocate for broadening the base of pilot training beyond the technical skills needed to fly an aircraft. His research has not only contributed to professional knowledge surrounding pilot education and training, but represents

Chief flight examiner wins excellence award

a significant advance in the methodology of instruction.

He was nominated for the award by the University’s manager of professional programmes Frank Sharp who says notwithstanding his in-depth contribution, Dr de Montalk has never lost sight of the fundamentals of flying and the necessary common sense that accompanies that.

“Ritchie has a long and distinguished record in aviation, both as a flight instructor imparting knowledge and, latterly, in academic research to further the understanding of the skills and competencies that need particular attention during training of pilots preparing for careers as professional pilots,” he says.

“He has been passing on his knowledge in an enthusiastic, informative and lasting manner since he first qualified as a flying instructor in 1962.”

Greg Vujcich, for whom the award is named, was a well-respected instructor, Air New Zealand captain and association member who died suddenly in 2007.

A navigation specialist in the School of Aviation was honoured by the Royal Aeronautical Society for his long and dedicated service to the industry.

Squadron Leader Hugh Francis, who recently retired as a senior tutor, received a silver meritorious service award at a society dinner.

He joined the University 18 years ago after a 33-year career in the Royal New Zealand Air Force as a navigator and staff officer, including 9000 flying hours and a two-year secondment with the Republic of Singapore Air Force to train navigators.

Mr Francis was responsible for ensuring that student pilots taking the Air Transport Pilot major of the Bachelor of Aviation were able to demonstrate the necessary level of navigation and flight-planning professional knowledge to meet requirements for their licences.

Frank Sharp, manager of professional programmes at the School of Aviation, said the award recognised Mr Francis’s dedicated teaching, continued enthusiasm to pass

Aviation industry honours navigation specialist

on professional knowledge and long service in civil and military aviation over the past 51 years.

“Hugh has been a stalwart of the School of Aviation and his continuing enthusiasm for teaching students the art of navigation, from the basics through to Air Transport Pilot Licence level, has given many graduates the professional knowledge base that has enabled them to

develop into successful airline captains,” he said.

“Hugh’s energy and drive to instil this knowledge was particularly evident in the additional efforts he put into international contracts and many students from Indonesia, China and Singapore benefited from the thoroughness of his instruction.”

The Hugh Francis Navigation Award is his legacy to the School and is presented twice yearly to a Wings recipient.

Photo of Hugh Francis in his early Royal New Zealand Air Force days.

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| Massey University | April 2012 | definingnz | 15

Massey leads the way in aviation safety training

The School of Aviation’s approach to safety training for pilots has impressed members of the Australian aviation industry.

Deputy chief flight instructor Paul Kearney was invited by the Australian Civil Aviation Safety Authority to give a guest speech National Chief Flying Instructors Conference in Canberra last month.

Mr Kearney says the school took the initiative to develop what is known as threat and error management (TEM) into its training programme when the new fleet of Diamond aircraft was purchased two years ago.

He says the principles of TEM were embedded in a number of existing procedures in the school and, working alongside the Air New Zealand Aviation Institute, the process was formalised. This predated the legislative requirement for TEM

that took effect last year in New Zealand.

“While most commercial aircraft have a two-pilot operation, we had to develop this process and apply it to a single pilot model,” Mr Kearney says.

Standard operating procedures for all flight operations were published by the school, which introduced scenario- based training for every flight lesson and developed a model for “before start” and

“top of descent” checklists.

A crew concept was also developed as a result of research by the school’s chief flight examiner, Dr Ritchie de Montalk, who identified the need for “soft” skills such as teamwork, leadership and customer awareness to be taught during flight training because of their importance to the role of modern airline pilots.

Students fly in pairs like an airline crew and share the jobs such as checking

weather, planning the flight, ordering fuel and doing a pre checks on the aircraft. It is used on all training flights.

“Traditionally, when you teach someone to fly you will go through each procedure in turn so if you are showing them how to land you will show them and they will do it,” Mr Kearney says.

“We take a scenario-based approach from day one. For example, an exercise might be that you are taking friends to a rugby match in New Plymouth, which will test your time management and fuel skills. When you are there you are told the weather closes in so you have to land back in Palmerston North using your instruments. This is the type of threat and error management we are including.”

Mr Kearney, who won the Civil Aviation Author ity’s top flying instructor award in 2008 and is also the school’s quality assurance manager, says scenario-based training is little used in the Asia-Pacific and the delegates at the conference, including aeroplane and helicopter chief flying instructors, chief pilots and chief ground instructors, were very interested in Massey’s approach.

“The project has been an exciting challenge with encouraging results. I had several people come up to me after my presentation to comment about how much they enjoyed it, but more importantly to ask more questions about the great work we are doing with scenario-based training and threat and error management at Massey.”

Meet the chief flight instructor

What was your first job in the aviation industry?

My first job after graduating was as an operations assistant at the University’s Milson Flight Systems Centre. I did a range of tasks – fuelling, cleaning, and mowing the lawns, as well as instructing.

It just goes to show that with desire and motivation you can achieve your goals.

What further training have you undertaken since then?

I completed my full Air Transport Pilot’s Licence last year, and have also completed a Graduate Diploma in Business Studies (endorsed in flight

instruction) from Massey, and I am studying for a Postgraduate Diploma in Aviation.

What about your family life?

I am a Taranaki boy – you could say I have amber and black running through my veins. But I now live in Palmerston North with my wife Alison, an Air Nelson captain and former flight instructor, and my seven-month old baby Tamara.

And when you aren’t flying?

You will find me spending time with my family, playing squash, or working on my classic car – a 1967 Mustang.

Chief flight instructor Craig Whyte knows first-hand the highs and lows his students’ experience – as he has been through the same training. He graduated with his Bachelor of Aviation from Massey University in 1995.

Paul Kearney

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16 | definingnz | April 2012 | Massey University

Massey broadens student base in Singapore

The latest initiative from Massey School of Aviation and the Singapore Aviation Academy will allow graduates of Singapore polytechnic institutes to enrol in Massey’s Bachelor of Aviation Management degree.

The students will spend one semester in New Zealand, but complete their degree in Singapore. The aim is to offer Singaporean students the opportunity to enjoy the New Zealand campus experience as part of their degree programme.

“This is a very exciting development for the School of Aviation as it will allow us to attract students from a much broader base into our aviation management programme,” says Ashok Poduval, CEO of Massey University School of Aviation.

“Our partnership with the Singapore Aviation Academy has been very

successful over the past 15 years and this initiative can only mean that more young Singaporeans will consider a career in aviation and study through Massey.”

This is just the latest development in a partnership that began in 1997 when an agreement was signed by Singapore’s Director General of Civil Aviation and Massey University’s Vice- Chancellor. It opened the way for university aviation distance learning to take place in Singapore.

Under the terms of the agreement, Massey University and the Singapore Aviation Academy agreed to work together to offer Massey’s Bachelor of Aviation degree at the Academy’s Changi complex. The first course commenced in February 1998.

Since then, Massey has begun offering its Bachelor of Aviation

Management degree in Singapore, and also its postgraduate programmes.

Distance learning has also been made possible for international students residing in other locations, but who find it more convenient to study through Singapore.

School of Aviation CEO Ashok Poduval receiving an appreciation award from the Singapore Aviation Academy in 2008

Massey University School of Aviation will host its 4th Aviation Symposium on February 14-16, 2013 in Palmerston North, New Zealand.

The symposium serves as a platform for aviation researchers to present and exchange ideas, and to broaden professional relationships among international colleagues.

As in previous years, the theme for the 4th Symposium is “Contemporary Issues in Aviation” to encourage participation from a wider spectrum of disciplines in aviation.

There have already been significant expressions of interest from researchers in America, Europe, and Australasia, and it is expected that the 2013 conference will be the most successful so far.

There is still time for researchers and practitioners to submit articles for consideration.

Please contact the School of Aviation for more details – [email protected]

For delegates, the event will provide an opportunity to listen to the latest in aviation research and ask questions of presenters, as well as to network with others in the aviation industry.

Aviation Symposium 2013

Contemporary Issues in Aviation 14/15/16 February 2013

0800 MASSEY aviation.massey.ac.nz

Massey University Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey at the 2010 Aviation Industry Conference & Symposium.

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| Massey University | April 2012 | definingnz | 17

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18 | definingnz | April 2012 | Massey University

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References

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