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SENIOR GENERATION ACTION AND ISSUES – NELSON TASMAN

Issue 94 • FEBRUARY 2016

20 New Positive Ageing Chair

06 Antique and Classic Boat Show

04 Bringing Nature Back

Volunteers Dave and Carol Garnett have devoted thousands of hours to the Brook Waimarama Sanctuary project

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Thanks to our sponsors

Mudcakes and Roses is no longer mailed free to readers.

The magazine is still widely available at Council’s Office, Service Centres, Libraries and the Richmond Mall. You can also read it online at the Tasman District Council website, www.tasman.govt.nz/mudcakes.

Alternatively, readers can pay a $10 annual subscription to receive Mudcakes in the mail. Contact Tara Fifield at the Tasman District Council Ph. 03 543 8578.

How to get your copy!

What a fantastic summer we’ve been having. Hopefully you’ve been able to get out and make the most of it.

In this issue we meet some of the dedicated volunteers behind the Brook Waimarama Sanctuary project. With over 500 active volunteers putting in 30,000+

hours last year, the vision behind this project seems to have really captured the imagination of many Nelson-Tasman residents. It’s now getting to an exciting stage with the pest-proof fence due for completion in May.

Antique and classic boat collecting and restoration is a hobby practiced by people all over the world. St Arnaud in the Tasman region is becoming known as a hub for classic boating in New Zealand thanks to the annual Antique and Classic Boat Show held at Lake Rotoiti.

Mudcakes & Roses catches up with show organiser Pete Rainey to find out more about what makes a classic boat and why people love them so much.

We also introduce the new chairperson of the Positive Ageing Forum Charles Tyrrell who shares his views on ageing and what he sees as the key issues for the forum in 2016.

Gardening guru Philippa Foes-Lamb tells us why now is the time to attack those pesky Passionvine Hoppers and Retro Metro Ro Cambridge takes a look at books and films that show the dark side of technology.

With best wishes, the Mudcakes and Roses team.

Your feedback, story ideas and creative writing contributions are always welcome – please email [email protected], call us on 03 928 0091 or write to us at Mudcakes

& Roses, Hothouse Communications, 4/203 Queen Street, Richmond, 7000

Mudcakes & Roses Noticeboard

Positive Ageing Forum

Positive Ageing Forum meetings are held at Richmond library from 1.00pm until 3.00pm. All welcome. The first Positive Ageing Forum date has changed to Monday, 29th February 2016.

Positive Ageing Expo

The Positive Ageing Expo is on again 1 April 2016. We have over 60 stalls already registered and with 75 available, if you want a stall don’t delay! To book a stall, contact Mike Tasman-Jones, Tasman District Council Community Partnerships Coordinator Ph (03) 543 8403 or email:

[email protected]

Free Fitness, Exercise and Games for Older Adults

& Seniors

See the What’s On page for details of free fitness classes and games for older adults.

Community Plan for an Ageing Population update

The first stage of the Community Planning for an Ageing Population (CPAP) is complete. Experienced researcher Janet Taylor has researched and collated reports on the needs of older people, identified key service providers, and developed a questionnaire and conducted an initial survey of providers. The next stage, surveying the users and community, is on hold pending the establishment of the new economic services agency.

The recent review of the economic development services has resulted in the agency that coordinates CPAP, the Economic Development Agency (EDA), being merged with Nelson Tasman Tourism (NTT). After discussion between Nelson City Council, Tasman District Council and the EDA, it was agreed that the CPAP project needs to be put on hold until the new agency has been formally constituted and established and has agreed their work stream/priorities. CPAP Chairperson Cr Judene Edgar says that the opportunities and challenges presented by an ageing population need to be addressed, so the work done so far will remain valuable.

Living in Retirement Villages

The Commission for Financial Capability is running free seminars about living in retirement villages with support from the Retirement Villages Association and experienced legal practitioners.

These seminars are for intending retirement village residents and their families. The seminars focus on things to consider before choosing to live in a retirement village and practical tips before you sign up to live in a retirement village. Speakers from the Commission, Retirement Villages Association and legal profession will discuss types of retirement village structure, costs and operations. The seminars will also explain some important resident’s rights and where you can find out more information. The seminars are 90 minutes long and include plenty of dedicated question and answer time

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Heritage Week 2016 runs 16-24 April this year and is all about making discoveries. Put the dates in your diary now and get ready to enjoy free and low cost activities with friends and families. Pay tribute to Nelson’s peace movement with a panel unveil in the Peace Grove, uncover a scandal in South Street, view rarely seen items on a Cathedral tour, visit Jane Evans’ cottage, and find out about maps and murders. Watch Tape Art create a story of early photographers at the Nelson Provincial Museum. Visit the Refinery Artspace to see amazing photographs in Picturing the PROW. Guided heritage walks will be on offer, including a new armchair tour option for those not so energetic.

A fascinating show about the works of Rutherford using sound and light is sure to delight all ages. Devon McLean talks about technology in his work to save our natural environment in Rats and Rainbows and Wai Māori introduce Life in the River close up. The play Maungatapu will have you engrossed with the

murderous pair Burgess and Sullivan, as will Bill Unwin’s talk on the Bill Hill Murder.

Grandparents take note of the fun things to do with your grandchildren including discovering science, spiders and great craft activities like making a kite for peace.

It might seem strange to be thinking about winter when its still 25 degrees outside, but now’s the time to get your stock of Good Wood sorted for winter.

The Tasman District and Nelson City Councils promote reducing air pollution through the Good Wood Supplier scheme. It is a joint project between the Councils and wood suppliers, who undertake to supply firewood according to best practice and contribute to improving air quality in Nelson and Richmond.

Green wood will not burn efficiently, leaving you with a cold

house and a smoky fire. Striking two pieces of wood together is a good way to check if it is dry enough. Dry wood will give a resonant crack and wet wood will make a dull thud.

Heritage Week 2016

Good Wood

A full programme will be in your next copy of this magazine or go to www.Nelson.govt.nz

Check out the full list of Good Wood suppliers on Council websites – www.tasman.govt.nz or www.nelson.govt.nz

throughout the event. Tea, coffee and light refreshments will be provided. Places are limited, so registration is essential. For further information or to register your attendance, call 0800 268 269. The Nelson seminar is on 30 March 2016.

Strategies for Successful Ageing – Free online course

Find out how staying happy, healthy, socially-connected and active can help you age successfully, with this free online course.

Visit: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/successful-ageing

Scammers Targeting Elderly Residents

Scammers posing as power company staff are targeting retired people living on their own, in retirement villages or rest homes. The scammers have taken at least $20,000 from 11 residents in Christchurch. They have telephoned victims pretending to be from Meridian or another power company, saying payments are not going through and requesting PIN numbers and bank account details.

“After the call has finished another scammer knocks on

the victim's door posing as a bank employee to collect the faulty cards and provides them with a replacement card and documentation.” The replacement card is actually a prezzy card, Detective Sergeant Hooke said.

The scammers appeared plausible, but were pushy, she said.

Safety Measures

• No reputable company will request bank details or PIN numbers

• Take down the name and number of dodgy callers

• Contact the genuine company to verify callers or door knockers

• Reputable employees will provide identification and won't be offended to wait while their employer is contacted

• Report any scams to the bank, power company and police

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Visiting Dave and Carol Garnett’s cosy heritage home in the Brook Valley in Nelson, it’s not hard to guess where their interests lie. On almost every single wall alongside the usual family photos, are prints, drawings and photographs of birds.

Dave is a self-confessed “bird fanatic” and this was one of the reasons that drew him to the Brook Waimarama Sanctuary project when the couple moved to Nelson from Auckland to be closer to their two sons.

Initially, Dave and Carol just enjoyed the Brook Valley as a pleasant walking spot. It was only when they saw an advertisement for the Brook Waimarama Sanctuary Field Officer position that they discovered the plans to create a 700 hectare wildlife sanctuary on the site of a former Water Reserve owned by Nelson City Council.

Dave says coming from England, a project on that scale was

“totally unknown.”

At that stage, Dave and Carol were both busy working - Dave, as a secondary school technology teacher and Carol as an administrator. When Dave retired six years ago, he planned to help out at an engineering workshop, but that fell through and he instead found himself signing up as a volunteer with The Brook Waimarama Sanctuary Trust.

Handy with a hammer, Dave was soon roped into doing odd jobs such as building cupboards, shelves and fixing toilet doors at the visitors centre. After a few months, he was asked to join the Asset Team responsible for all aspects of building and maintenance of the fence and other facilities.

As part of the Asset Team, Dave has worked on some major building projects including a garage/workshop/storage shed, an outdoor education deck and stage for school groups built about half a kilometre into the bush, surveying for the fence and most recently, building flat-pack emergency huts in remote areas.

“I love building things and my passion is birds. I’ve seen robins, weka, tomtits, harriers… one day,

I didn’t have my glasses on, but out of the corner of my eye, I saw a grey/blue bird on the side of a tree and I was so excited – I thought it must be a kokako.

I couldn’t swear it, but I’m claiming it!”

Dave says it’s exciting to be working with a team that’s dedicated and wanting to preserve the environment. He also feels privileged to be able to go into pristine areas that very few other people have seen.

“If you’ve ever seen rats, stoats or possums destroying native birds and plants, any contribution we can make to stopping it is so satisfying.”

Carol has also become involved as a volunteer after retiring in June 2015. “The day after I retired, I got a phone call asking if I’d be able to help out with administration in the Brook Sanctuary office! I have a good knowledge of computers and systems. I don’t get to do any of the sexy stuff, I just deal with the paperwork!” she says.

Carol and Dave both say one of the things they’ve enjoyed most about volunteering with The Brook Waimarama Sanctuary Trust is the great people they’ve met, including several young interns from overseas.

“One of the nice things is that it’s such a diverse group. There are a lot of people who are older, some with limited abilities physically, but they are still able to contribute in some way.

We have young people and old people. It’s also good to see young people from other countries who are taking an interest and spreading the word,” says Carol.

Carol says she chose to be involved because there is so much focus on the bad news in the world and what’s going wrong, it can sometimes feel overwhelming.

“If you do a little bit in your own backyard, that’s all you can do.

You feel like you can do something positive and it’s so satisfying.”

General Manager Hudson Dodd says its volunteers like Carol and Dave who are the backbone of the whole project.

Brook Volunteers – Bringing Nature Back

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“Dave and Carol are a shining example of the people who dedicate significant amounts of time and energy to the project, which is a testament to the quality of the vision behind it. Each of them work multiple days a week, showing how passionate they are about the project.

“As a community-based initiative, the project has always been of, by, for and about volunteers. Volunteers have made it what it is by putting in literally tens of thousands of hours.

We calculated over 30,000 hours per year and last year we had over 500 volunteers,” he says.

Hudson says volunteers come in “all shapes and sizes” and work across a range of different areas which can be broadly categorised into Field and Administration roles.

“The skill base is truly huge,” says Hudson. “It’s not an

overstatement to say that the project wouldn’t be happening at all without them including the Board of Trustees – all volunteers, who started the project and are now responsible for governance.”

The pest-proof fence is three quarters built and due for completion in May 2016. While its completion will be a major milestone, it will also mark the beginning of a new phase for the project.

“The fence is long awaited and has been a focus and dream for many years. While it has been seen as an end goal for fundraising, the fence is not an end, it’s actually the beginning of the real work of reintroducing species,” he says.

Get Involved

There are many ways to be involved in the project.

Volunteer roles include administration support, bird monitoring, fence maintenance, invasive plant control, lizard monitoring, public events, track cutting, trapping and visitor centre. You can also become a Friend of the Brook, make a donation or sponsor a fencepost. See the Brook website for details www.brooksanctuary.org.nz or call 03 546 2422.

Key Facts

• The Brook Waimarama Sanctuary is a community- based initiative working to create a pest-free wildlife sanctuary close to the Nelson city centre.

• The Sanctuary will extend over 700 hectares of a former Water Reserve owned by Nelson City Council. Most of the site comprises mature beech forest with occasional huge podocarps. The southern part of the site is diverse broadleaved forest on land cleared in the 19th Century. Over 250 species of plants have been recorded and the birdlife includes rare species such as NZ falcon, yellow-crowned parakeets, weka and robins.

• Key to creating the Brook Waimarama Sanctuary is construction of a pest-proof fence 14km long, to enclose the area, and to eradicate all the pest mammals within it.

• The full cost of fence construction and removal of the pests ($4.7M) has been raised to date, and fundraising is ongoing for visitor facilities.

• This will enable the re-creation of a historic piece of New Zealand which today is only found on a few offshore islands. Resident birds, reptiles and invertebrates will flourish and species previously lost from the area will be re-introduced.

• The site is an ideal size and location. It is a short distance from Nelson City, Stoke and Richmond with forested corridors to take birdlife from the sanctuary into these areas and into residents’

gardens. It is joined to the south to 100,000 plus hectares of native forest including the Mt Richmond Conservation Area.

• The project was launched in 2004 and has strong community involvement and support. It is administered by a charitable trust that includes representatives from local iwi.

• Both Nelson City Council and Tasman District Council contributed funding for the fence project ($1M and $300k respectively), and Nelson City Council contributes an annual operational grant ($70k).

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The stunning vista of Lake Rotoiti provides a picture perfect backdrop for the annual Antique and Classic Boat Show, now in its 17th year. Mudcakes and Roses caught up with show organiser Pete Rainey to find out why St Arnaud is becoming known as a centre for classic boating in New Zealand and the growing interest in the hobby of building and restoring classic boats.

How did the show get started?

I first thought of doing a show back in 1999 because I had an old boat that I'd found in a field on the way up to Lake Rotoiti. This boat was called La Paloma and it was one that I'd known when I was a kid up at the lake. I bought it and started doing it up and getting interested in antique boats. I also started subscribing to an American antique boat magazine and noticed that there were a lot of antique and classic boat shows happening in the States and I thought ‘nobody is doing that in New Zealand’ – at least, not that I knew of, so that’s when I kicked it off.

I basically just took some photos up at the lake of a little boat that I'd made for my father, had some posters made and put them out there and waited to see what would it happen.

How has it grown since that time?

In our first year we had about 35 boats and we thought ‘gosh that’s great’ so we just kept on growing really. Normally we get between 130 to 150 boats, depending on what’s happening in the main centres. The Christchurch earthquakes put a bit of a dent in things for a couple of years. We get boats from all around the country – from Warkworth to Invercargill. People come from all over New Zealand and Australia and we’ve had people tell us they’ve come over especially for the show from the United States and the United Kingdom, so it’s definitely getting a bit of a reputation. Between 1500 and 2000 people turn up including the boat owners.

Why hold the event at Lake Rotoiti?

It’s quite a challenging venue! Obviously it’s a beautiful setting for boat show – it really is one of the most stunning views in New Zealand if not the world in terms of viewing the boats.

I've been coming to Rotoiti since I was a kid and I really love

the area and have always wanted to try and do an event there. There’s also a strong boating heritage on Rotoiti, both with recreational boats and with race boats. The challenge for us is that it’s an alpine environment and even though the weather can be beautiful, at other times it can be extremely challenging – we’ve even had snow on occasions, not right around the boats, but certainly down the ranges on either side of the lake! It can be very challenging when it gets cold and southerly, but that’s just part of the charm and people tend to enjoy it regardless.

Tell us about the team behind the event…

There's been a core team of a few individuals for a few years, and it’s a really strong supportive team from the person who puts up the marquee to manning administration to calling races to doing all the rubbish and helping out on the gate. It’s a great bunch of people, I can't name them all individually, but I’m very grateful to them and we love coming together for the event every year.

Are there other shows like this in New Zealand?

Not that I know of. There are other classic boat events in New Zealand – a big one that happens in Auckland, but that’s on the sea and involves large boats like launches and yachts.

There's also a classic boat run or parade at Lake Rotoiti in the North Island but they don't display on land, they just tootle around on the lake. Our show is quite different in that we have the boats on display on land during the morning so that people can actually wander around and get up real close, talk to the owners and have a look in them – that’s part of the difference.

How popular is the pastime of building and restoring classic boats?

It’s definitely growing and we know that our show has triggered a lot of people to restore boats or build new boats to classic designs. I know the classic car, classic motorbike and classic aeroplane scene is pretty strong. This show provides a real focus for people who are interested in getting into classic boating and it can be an extremely affordable way of boating. Boats don’t need to cost a lot of money and in my experience, small boats with modest engines can be just as much fun as great big boats.

Antique and Classic Boatshow

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We’re also seeing growing interest from young people and women. We had two boats last year that won prizes that were made by people in their 20s or younger so age is certainly no barrier – it’s not the domain of old people at all. It’s fantastic to see the energy and enthusiasm from young people.

What is it about antique and classic boats that appeals to people do you think?

It brings back memories from the past – often people have had an experience when they were younger or in the old days of classic boats and wish that they could see that kind of boat again, then they come along to the show and are reminded of what boating used to be like. We’ve had some people come along and find boats that they knew when they were kids.

We had a couple of 90 year old guys from the West Coast who saw a yacht that they'd sailed on 60 years ago and hadn't seen since – those sorts of things are very special.

Any particular favourite boats over the years?

All boats that I own are my favourites! They have to be, otherwise I wouldn't own them. But look, I'm really enthusiastic about a boat that my business partner and I are doing up at the moment which is an Elray III – a really great old racing hydroplane from 1967.

We’re going through a very slow and protracted restoration of that boat. It will be on display at this year’s show so people can see the progress so far. It’s a great old racing boat that goes 150mile an hour and at one stage was the fastest boat in New Zealand.

How many classic boats have you restored over the years, and do you keep them?

I’ve lost count of the number of boats I’ve restored over the years – and I’m not allowed to say! We’ve now got a big Antique and Classic Boat Museum at St Arnaud. It opened about 18 months ago in a brand new shed in behind the shop and we've got about 30 boats in there. They don't all belong to me of course!

What makes an “antique or classic” boat?

Are there certain criteria?

No. I always say to people it really doesn't matter – if you think it’s a classic, it is. Some boats may be brand new but maybe they’ve been built to an old design. Fibreglass boats can also be classics – there's a huge movement in the States called

‘Fibreglassics’ for people who are into older fibreglass boats.

What can people expect to see at this year’s show?

We’ll have a huge range from steamboats to big mahogany runabouts through to racing hydroplanes, racing yachts and small sea canoes. We also get quite a lot of clinkers. From early morning on both days you can wander around the boats on land, chat with the owners and view displays about their restoration or rebuild. In the afternoon, you can watch the races on the lake. They’re always a lot of fun. The show is always special. This year, we’re hoping to have a visit from Peter Knight Jnr and maybe his dad, Peter Knight who is a famous boat racer.

Peter Knight Jnr has just done up his dad’s old boat Bel Air and hopefully that will be there at the show for people to see.

What are the plans for the future of the show?

It’s certainly our intention to keep the energy and enthusiasm for classic boating going and to really stamp Lake Rotoiti as the

centre of classic boating in New Zealand. That’s our mission – just in a quiet sort of way. It’s our intention to get a trust up and running soon to foster classic boating and to really make the museum a must-see attraction. Already it’s getting quite a lot of patronage. We hope to fill it up with more boats and more displays and interactive stuff – to develop it as a good regional museum that can display some of the amazing old classic boats that we have around this region.

Give us the dates & details for this year’s show…

The show is on 5 & 6 March 2016 at Lake Rotoiti, St Arnaud.

We ask for a $15 donation per person or $20 for the weekend and school kids are free. We have a big food tent that’s run by the local school fundraising committee so there’s lots of food and drink available on site as well. You can see further details on our website www.nzclassicboats.com or people are welcome to get in touch with me on email [email protected]

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GARDENING

Great Time to Plant Veges

Hi, it’s a new gardening year with lots of enjoyment ahead in the coming months. This summer has been an unusual one so far, with the driest December in fifty years, more wind than usual and fluctuating temperatures. It’s easy to become frustrated at this time of year but take heart, cooler weather will be here before we know it.

Philippa Foes-Lamb

If you have any questions or topic suggestions, I’d love it if you would email me at [email protected] or write to me c/- Mudcakes and Roses.

My radio show, Green Thumbs & Dirty Fingers is full of more gardening tips and airs each fortnight on Fresh FM, Nelson-Tasman 104.8, Golden Bay 95.0 on Tuesday at 10.40am, replayed the following Saturday at 2.40pm.

Happy gardening.

Heirloom Perennial Nursery & Art Studio

My nursery specialises in hardy perennials, particularly gorgeous cranesbill geraniums.

A selection of my mixed-media creations (unique gift tags, journal covers, decorative magnets etc), most with a botanical theme, are available for purchase from my studio. Commissions welcomed.

Now Open Mondays and Thursdays 10.00 am – 4.00 pm Philippa Foes-Lamb,

25 Maisey Rd, Redwood Valley Ph: 03 544 3131 or 021 522 775 Email: [email protected] A juvenile Passionvine Hopper – get them now before they

start hopping!

new growth and more flowers. If your roses are showing signs of stress, give them a good amount of fish compost and/or sheep manure, then mulch.

Passionvine hoppers are rearing their heads all around the garden at the moment. As the name suggests they love passionfruit vines but will also attack citrus, beans, grapevines, tomatoes, cucumbers, courgettes or any other succulent stems, sucking the life out of them. If you have a

really bad infestation you will hardly be able to see the stems for the hoppers.

In late January/early-mid February the juveniles appear and this is the time to launch an attack with your fingertips or hit them with your favourite spray, preferably organic. They are easily recognisable because they have ‘’fluffy-bums’’, which is what we gardeners love to call them. By the time they are adults it is almost impossible to kill them because as their name suggests they ‘’hop’’ very well.

Early summer-flowering shrubs will benefit from a trim now.

This will encourage new growth that will harden off before the cooler weather hits. Hebes in particular become straggly very quickly so it’s important to give them a thorough trim as the flowers die off. If you have large hebes that are mostly bare, have a close look for new growth on the lower branches and cut right back to it.

Dead-heading perennials and annuals regularly will encourage new growth and more flowers well into late Autumn.

Autumn-fruiting raspberries will be putting on good growth and flowers now so it’s the perfect time to ensure they are weed free, composted, mulched and watered as deeply as water restrictions allow as this will help ensure a good crop.

Trim any stone-fruit trees that have cropped, removing dead or diseased wood.

Leafy greens such as lettuces, silverbeet and spinach can struggle at this time of year so it’s a good idea to plant them in an area that only gets morning sun. This will give them a rest from the intense afternoon heat and help prevent bolting to seed. The key to succulent greens is keeping them growing quickly and evenly so they don’t get stressed. If you don’t have the right semi-shady spot in your garden, plant them in containers so they can be moved around.

Tomatoes will be in full growth now and fruit will be ripening so continue to give them a bi-weekly liquid feed. Remove all the old leaves or any leaves that are shading your fruit as this lets maximum sunlight reach the tomatoes, aiding ripening.

Keep your capsicums, chillis, courgettes and eggplants weed free and well-mulched. Harvesting courgettes regularly encourages them to produce more and also eliminates the

‘’what to do with this marrow’’ scenario.

Continue to dead-head your roses back to a healthy fat bud.

A sharp diagonal cut just above the bud will encourage strong

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The Retro Metro

I’ve been doing a techno-spring-clean in an attempt to rationalise the content and set up of my two computers, my smartphone and tablets. The process has driven me to the brink of insanity. How to rationalise the thousands of misnamed folders, duplicated files, and unlabelled photos they jointly contain? How to access all those other files stored in “the cloud” and barricaded behind passwords I’ve forgotten?

Spring-cleaning in the real world is a cinch in comparison. Neither does it induce the same levels of paranoia. Tracking my own labyrinthine connections to web-based services has been an unpleasant reminder that even a single Gmail, Google, Tweet, or Facebook gives you an existence in cyberspace which you cannot reverse. And then who knows what Forces of Darkness can molest your cyber-self with impunity?

These paranoid thoughts have influenced my grim selection of books and films this month, beginning with Cormac McCarthy’s novel The Road in which a father leads his young son through a grim post-apocalyptic American landscape. It feels as if the only tenderness left in the world lies between the man and the boy as they travel in search of refuge.

The deeply unsettling British TV drama series Black Mirror plunges us into the darkest depths of technological possibility to reveal “the way we might be living in 10 minutes’ time if

we’re clumsy.” Canadian author Margaret Atwood may dismiss sci-fi as “talking squids in outer space”, but in novels like Oryx and Crake, and The Year of the Flood she too explores how current technologies such as human genetic engineering and biological weapons are likely to create distinctly dystopian futures.

Classics like 1984 by George Orwell and Brave New World by Aldous Huxley are reminders of just how prescient fiction writers often are.

Other writers and TV-makers don’t need to look into the future for horrible dramatic possibility. They reveal what’s

dystopic in the present or recent past, rather than in some distant future. U.S. TV series Mr Robot features a highly anxious young man who finds real life rather baffling, but who is a savant in cyberspace. By day he works as a cyber-security engineer. By night he’s a vigilante computer hacker

using technology to destroy shady individuals and corporations.

In The Wire, a U.S. TV series, present- day Baltimore is the dystopia where corrupt or under-funded institutions lead to crime and human misery. The same team produced Treme,

a TV series set in post-Hurricane New Orleans showing ordinary people struggling to rebuild their lives in the face of clumsy, indifferent bureaucracy and corporate

corruption. Great musical performances punctuate the show and infuse it with a life-affirming joyousness. Books of journalism like Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a

Storm-Ravaged Hospital by Sheri Fink, and Zeitoun by Dave Eggers reveal how rapidly the same disaster distorted notions of compassion and justice.

However, for a comprehensive guide to all the anxieties which might prey upon the 21st century human mind, you must read 11,002 Things to be Miserable About by Lia and Nick Romeo. You’ll find plenty to agonise over, from elective surgery and Robert Mugabe, to bubble gum-flavoured ice cream and public executions.

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Red Cross here to help Tasman

Here at New Zealand Red Cross, we’ve just celebrated our 100th birthday.

We might be a century old, but we’re still going strong – in the Tasman region, we have more than 500 members and volunteers. You’ll see them out and about in the community, providing a wide variety of services. From supporting former refugees along their resettlement journey to responding to disasters and emergencies, Red Cross is there when it matters.

Our friendly community transport drivers support people who find it difficult to manage their own transport. This door-to-door service helps people get to medical appointments, and all our drivers are trained in First Aid. Our Meals on Wheels volunteers deliver 150 hot meals across the Tasman region every day, supporting people who are elderly, ill or live with disabilities.

We’re proud to be the primary provider of refugee resettlement services in New Zealand. Our staff and volunteers welcome about 75 people from refugee backgrounds to Nelson every year. They help families with everything from enrolling with doctors and schools to understanding Kiwi culture, while our skilled social workers and staff provide ongoing support.

During emergencies, our local Disaster Welfare and Support Teams are on hand to help. These volunteers train regularly so they can respond to natural disasters and help people in your community get through safely. They’re on call 24/7, ready to go if there’s a flood, earthquake or tsunami.

You’ll also find us in schools, providing free first aid and peer support training. Our Red Cross Shops sell a wide range of quality preloved goods, while our knitting group crafts baby items and blankets to be donated locally.

We love our volunteers, and we’d love you to join us. If you’re keen to get involved, or want to chat to one of our team, contact Amy or Jackie on 546 5012 or at nelson@

redcross.org.nz.

Interested in becoming a member? Our Nelson Branch meets monthly and supports several local initiatives. This includes everything from funding a camp for at risk youth to supporting Nelson Food Bank and night shelter. Watch out for our various fundraising events throughout the year – the next one is our Annual Appeal, running from 29 February to 5 March.

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BeWell Books

These days many people’s first port of call to find out about health issues is the internet. And while there’s nothing wrong with that, there are times when a more considered and in-depth approach provides added reassurance or helpful advice. That’s where Tasman District Libraries BeWell Books scheme comes in. Books can help with understanding and managing a range of commonly experienced health problems, such as depression, anxiety and stress, chronic pain and heart health.

Tasman District Libraries and Nelson Bays Primary Health have worked together to offer the BeWell Books health information scheme to people living in Tasman District.

Based on the successful UK initiative, Books on Prescription, BeWell Books have been carefully selected and approved by specialists from Nelson Bays Primary Health. With BeWell Books you’re assured you’re reading credible and up to date information.

If you and your health professional think you may benefit from reading more about your condition, they will issue you with a BeWell Books voucher. All you need to do is take the voucher into either Richmond or Motueka Library and exchange it for a book from the BeWell Books selection. The books are easily identified by the BeWell label on the spine. And any rental charges are waived on new BeWell Books.

You do need to be a member of Tasman District Libraries. If you are not a member, just bring along proof of identification and address. Signing up is easy.

BeWell Books can also be borrowed without a voucher.

However normal library rental charges apply to new items.

Currently the BeWell Books scheme is available at Richmond and Motueka Libraries.

What’s Happening at Tasman Libraries?

LIBRARIES

Learn at your Library in 2016

The library is a space for lifelong learning – at your own pace, using our books and resources, or more formally. Nelson Public Libraries are planning a range of learning opportunities in 2016, with classes, talks, information displays and more – and we are always keen to hear what you want us to offer, so let us know.

In February we have two new programmes:

Te Reo

Māori language for beginners. This is a free ten week Te Reo programme, taught by Cindy Batt, Library Assistant and qualified Te Reo tutor, will run on Wednesdays, 12.30-1.30 from 10 February. The classes will be fun and interactive.

Tai Chi

Tai Chi will be taught by members of the Nelson Taoist Tai Chi Club, with a free taster session on Thursday 11 February, 12-1, followed by a six week programme for $30. Stretch your mind and body!

Computer and device classes have proved very popular for the Nelson Community. A wide variety of free tutorials are being offered again this year, both at Elma Turner and Stoke Libraries, from basic skills using the Internet, using a Tablet, MS Word, Spreadsheets to newspapers online, Library Apps, research databases, social media and Minecraft for adults.

All classes are listed on the Libraries’ website. Bookings are essential, and book early, because they fill quickly.

In addition to classes, one-on-one IT tutorial assistance is offered at our Device Advice sessions.

For information and booking details about all of our programmes see the library website:

www.nelsonpubliclibraries.co.nz

(12)

12.

Mudcakes and Roses

Where can I learn more about vision and aging?

Visit www.nei.nih.gov/agingeye

Aging and Your Eyes Aging and Your Eyes

What vision changes are normal with age?

Needing glasses to see up close.

Having trouble adjusting to glare.

Having difficulty telling apart some colors.

Needing more light to see well.

Are vision loss and blindness a normal part of aging?

No!

But as you age, you are at higher risk for developing age-related eye diseases and conditions:

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)

Damage to the macula of the eye.

Cataract

Clouding of the lens of the eye.

Diabetic retinopathy

Damage to blood vessels in the retina.

Glaucoma

Damage to the optic nerve.

Dry eye

Eyes do not make enough tears.

Low vision

Difficulty seeing, even with glasses, medicine, or surgery.

Are there warning signs?

Many eye diseases have no early warning signs but can be detected through a comprehensive dilated eye exam.

RAY OF LIGHT

PUPIL RETINA

OPTIC NERVE

RAY OF LIGHT

PUPIL RETINA

OPTIC NERVE Portion

of retina that can be seen through undilated pupil.

Portion of retina that can be seen through dilated pupil.

UNDILATED PUPIL DILATED PUPIL

What can I do to protect my sight?

Have regular dilated eye exams.

Know your family’s eye health history.

Be physically active.

Eat a diet rich in fish and green leafy veggies.

Control your diabetes if you have it.

Stop smoking.

Wear sunglasses and a brimmed hat outside.

Wear protective eyewear when working around your house or playing sports.

What if I’ve already lost vision?

Help is available. Talk with your eye care professional about vision rehabilitation.

Where can I learn more about vision and aging?

Aging and Your Eyes Aging and Your Eyes

What vision changes are normal with age?

Needing glasses to see up close.

Having trouble adjusting to glare.

Having difficulty telling apart some colors.

Needing more light to see well.

Are vision loss and blindness a normal part of aging?

No!

But as you age, you are at higher risk for developing age-related eye diseases and conditions:

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)

Damage to the macula of the eye.

Cataract

Clouding of the lens of the eye.

Diabetic retinopathy

Damage to blood vessels in the retina.

Glaucoma

Damage to the optic nerve.

Dry eye

Eyes do not make enough tears.

Low vision

Difficulty seeing, even with glasses, medicine, or surgery.

Are there warning signs?

Many eye diseases have no early warning signs but can be detected through a comprehensive dilated eye exam.

RAY OF LIGHT

PUPIL RETINA

OPTIC NERVE

RAY OF LIGHT

PUPIL RETINA

OPTIC NERVE Portion

of retina that can be seen through undilated pupil.

Portion of retina that can be seen through dilated pupil.

UNDILATED PUPIL DILATED PUPIL

What can I do to protect my sight?

Have regular dilated eye exams.

Know your family’s eye health history.

Be physically active.

Eat a diet rich in fish and green leafy veggies.

Control your diabetes if you have it.

Stop smoking.

Wear sunglasses and a brimmed hat outside.

Wear protective eyewear when working around your house or playing sports.

What if I’ve already lost vision?

Help is available. Talk with your eye care professional about vision rehabilitation.

Where can I learn more about vision and aging?

Visit www.nei.nih.gov/agingeye

Source: National Eye Institute, 2013

HEALTH

544 4400

www.wrfs.co.nz

Create a unique and meaningful farewell

We can provide every service and option, and leave you with memories of a lifetime of love.

Source: National Eye Institute, 2013

(13)

ISSUE 94. FEBRUARY 2016

13.

Clues

Across

1. Funeral garlands 4. Former lover, old ...

7. Reykjavik is there 8. Scratch out 9. Stacked

12. Intermittently (2,3,3) 15. Show up again 17. Inclined letter style 18. Loose pants, ... shorts 21. Notorious affair 22. Dissect (3,2) 23. Rags

Down

1. More deserving 2. Take as being true 3. Scorch

4. Melt into the background 5. Airman

6. Outside limit 10. Wooden joining peg 11. Native New Zealander 13. Burns unsteadily 14. Communist 16. Unoccupied

18. Political power group 19. Invitation reply (1,1,1,1) 20. Angler's throw

Crossword

This proof shows final advertisement layout only, it does not show final print quality, colour or scale.

Customer Proof

Directory Classification Team

Ad Size

Rep Name

Ad ID

Designation

TAG

Date Printed Cust.ID Customer Name

Signature of Advertiser

Ph/Fax: 548 1478

Clinical Dental Prosthetist

Gilbert Matravers

SPECIALISING IN

“Someone has to make the best teeth”

Nelson Denture

Clinic

The Smile Designers

• BPS Dentures - latest technology infection moulded dentures.

Excellent fit and extremely natural appearance

• New Dentures

• Replacement Dentures

• Cosmetic Dentures to Support and Improve Facial Structures

• Total Professional Care for Denture Patients

FREE CONSULTATION

& ADVICE

OUR GUARANTEE IS IN YOUR SMILE

EXPERIENCE COUNTS

35 Waimea Road

0800 2 SMILE

57330 - RACHEL LUGG

Dental Laboratories 11567

NELSON

101753184 NELSON DENTURE CLINIC

6UVW Y-7286608/02

06/04/2010 C57

black yellow magenta cyan

This proof shows final advertisement layout only, it does not show final print quality, colour or scale.

started on

Customer Proof

Directory Classification Team Ad Size

Rep Name Ad ID

Designation TAG Date Printed Cust.ID Customer Name

Signature of Advertiser

Ph/Fax: 548 1478

Clinical Dental Prosthetist

Gilbert Matravers

SPECIALISING IN

“Someone has to make the best teeth”

Nelson Denture

Clinic

The Smile Designers

• BPS Dentures - latest technology infection moulded dentures.

Excellent fit and extremely natural appearance

• New Dentures

• Replacement Dentures

• Cosmetic Dentures to Support and Improve Facial Structures

• Total Professional Care for Denture Patients

FREE CONSULTATION

& ADVICE

OUR GUARANTEE IS IN YOUR SMILE EXPERIENCE

COUNTS

35 Waimea Road

0800 2 SMILE

57330 - RACHEL LUGG

Dental Laboratories 11567

NELSON

101753184 NELSON DENTURE CLINIC

6UVW Y-7286608/02

06/04/2010 C57

06/04/2010 14:34:39

black yellow

magenta cyan

This proof shows final advertisement layout only, it does not show final print quality, colour or scale.

started on

Customer Proof

Directory Classification Team

Ad Size

Rep Name

Ad ID

Designation

TAG

Date Printed Cust.ID Customer Name

Signature of Advertiser

Ph/Fax: 548 1478

Clinical Dental Prosthetist

Gilbert Matravers

SPECIALISING IN

“Someone has to make the best teeth”

Nelson Denture

Clinic

The Smile Designers

• BPS Dentures - latest technology infection moulded dentures.

Excellent fit and extremely natural appearance

• New Dentures

• Replacement Dentures

• Cosmetic Dentures to Support and Improve Facial Structures

• Total Professional Care for Denture Patients

FREE CONSULTATION

& ADVICE

OUR GUARANTEE IS IN YOUR SMILE

EXPERIENCE COUNTS

35 Waimea Road

0800 2 SMILE

57330 - RACHEL LUGG

Dental Laboratories 11567

NELSON

101753184 NELSON DENTURE CLINIC

6UVW Y-7286608/02

06/04/2010 C57

06/04/2010 14:34:39

black yellow

magenta cyan

This proof shows final advertisement layout only, it does not show final print quality, colour or scale.

started on

Customer Proof

Directory Classification Team

Ad Size

Rep Name

Ad ID

Designation

TAG

Date Printed Cust.ID Customer Name

Signature of Advertiser

Ph/Fax: 548 1478

Clinical Dental Prosthetist

Gilbert Matravers

SPECIALISING IN

“Someone has to make the best teeth”

Nelson Denture

Clinic

The Smile Designers

• BPS Dentures - latest technology infection moulded dentures.

Excellent fit and extremely natural appearance

• New Dentures

• Replacement Dentures

• Cosmetic Dentures to Support and Improve Facial Structures

• Total Professional Care for Denture Patients

FREE CONSULTATION

& ADVICE

OUR GUARANTEE IS IN YOUR SMILE

EXPERIENCE COUNTS

35 Waimea Road

0800 2 SMILE

57330 - RACHEL LUGG

Dental Laboratories 11567

NELSON

101753184 NELSON DENTURE CLINIC

6UVW Y-7286608/02

06/04/2010 C57

06/04/2010 14:34:39

black yellow

magenta cyan

This proof shows final advertisement layout only, it does not show final print quality, colour or scale.

started on

Customer Proof

Directory Classification Team

Ad Size

Rep Name

Ad ID

Designation

TAG

Date Printed Cust.ID Customer Name

Signature of Advertiser

Ph/Fax: 548 1478

Clinical Dental Prosthetist

Gilbert Matravers

SPECIALISING IN

“Someone has to make the best teeth”

Nelson Denture

Clinic

The Smile Designers

• BPS Dentures - latest technology infection moulded dentures.

Excellent fit and extremely natural appearance

• New Dentures

• Replacement Dentures

• Cosmetic Dentures to Support and Improve Facial Structures

• Total Professional Care for Denture Patients

FREE CONSULTATION

& ADVICE

OUR GUARANTEE IS IN YOUR SMILE

EXPERIENCE COUNTS

35 Waimea Road

0800 2 SMILE

57330 - RACHEL LUGG

Dental Laboratories 11567

NELSON

101753184 NELSON DENTURE CLINIC

6UVW Y-7286608/02

06/04/2010 C57

06/04/2010 14:34:39

black yellow

magenta cyan

This proof shows final advertisement layout only, it does not show final print quality, colour or scale.

started on

Customer Proof

Directory Classification Team Ad Size

Rep Name

Ad ID

Designation

TAG Date Printed Cust.ID Customer Name

Signature of Advertiser

Ph/Fax: 548 1478

Clinical Dental Prosthetist

Gilbert Matravers

SPECIALISING IN

“Someone has to make the best teeth”

Nelson Denture

Clinic

The Smile Designers

• BPS Dentures - latest technology infection moulded dentures.

Excellent fit and extremely natural appearance

• New Dentures

• Replacement Dentures

• Cosmetic Dentures to Support and Improve Facial Structures

• Total Professional Care for Denture Patients

FREE CONSULTATION

& ADVICE

OUR GUARANTEE IS IN YOUR SMILE

EXPERIENCE COUNTS

35 Waimea Road

0800 2 SMILE

57330 - RACHEL LUGG

Dental Laboratories 11567

NELSON

101753184 NELSON DENTURE CLINIC

6UVW Y-7286608/02

06/04/2010 C57

06/04/2010 14:34:39

Specialising in:

• BPS Dentures - latest technology injection moulded dentures.

Excellent fit and extremely natural appearance

• New Dentures

• Cosmetic Dentures to Support and Improve Facial Structures

• Replacement Dentures

• Total Professional Care for Denture Patients

Gilbert Matravers, Clinical Dental Prosthetist Ph/Fax: 548 1478 (0800 2 SMILE) 35 Waimea Road, Nelson

“Someone has to make the best teeth”

CROSSWORD

Answers page 19.

(14)

FEBRUARU 2016 SOME HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE REGIONAL EVENTS DATABASE. WWW.ITSON.CO.NZ

What’s On

Free Older Adult’s Exercise

& Events

Brought to you by the team at Richmond Aquatic Centre in conjunction with Nelson City Council.

Vitality - designed to assist in increased stability, respiratory function, pelvic and back mobility. The experience will be gradual and guided and is a great way to become or continue being active in a social setting! Set in some of Nelson's beautiful parks.

Ageless Yoga – Enjoy the benefits of yoga with a step by step approach to developing strength, flexibility, good breathing habits, concentration and relaxation. Each class will work through the fundamental principles of Yoga. Enhancing your energy levels, develop strength, flexibility, core strength, and improve your breathing habits. Our experienced instructor can guide those whom have never tried yoga all the way to the advanced.

Timeless Games – Join us for an afternoon of active games in the park including petanque, croquet, and badminton. A great social experience for those looking for fun through to the competitive. Movement is more fun when it’s a game, see you in the park.

Dancing in the Park – Take in the

scenery, the fresh Nelson air and the sounds of music while dancing in the park. A great social experience for everyone, regardless of you dancing ability (even for those with two left feet). This experience is all about guided movement to music and will leave your feet tapping for days (Add in the Whats On Fitness classes jpeg image with class times)

International Kai Festival 2016

Monday 8th February 2016 The eighth annual International Kai Festival is on again this Waitangi Day Holiday with Founders Heritage Park and Whakatu Marae working closely together to present a range of traditional and international foods to sample. Whakatu Marae will also host a Powhiri, a traditional welcome for visitors to the Marae, at 10.30am. There will be a huge variety of international foods on offer made by families living in the Nelson community. Food, live music Kapa Haka performances, stalls. Entry by gold coin donation. 10.30am - 3.30pm with Pōwhiri at 10.30am, Founders Heritage Park, 87 Atawhai Drive, Nelson. Entry also at Whakatu Marae

All about Apples

Now – Thursday 30th June 2016 IT'S ALL ABOUT APPLES at the Motueka District Museum this summer. The museum has a major exhibition covering the history, transportation, types and economic benefits to the district of APPLES.

Before this exhibition closes in June, there will be activities for children and adults (practice your apple peeling skills now!) Watch out for specific events in local advertising.

10.00am until 3.00pm daily, Motueka Museum and Muses Café, 136- 138 High Street Motueka http://

motuekadistrictmuseum.org.nz/

Nelson Opera in the Park

Saturday 13th February 2016 Nelson Opera in the Park is back with some of New Zealand’s best opera singers alongside a stellar line-up of contemporary performers. Bring a picnic and soak up the atmosphere for this wonderful night of music in the open air. With affordable ticket prices, this is a world-class event that everyone can enjoy. 7.30pm - 10pm, gates open at 5.30pm, Trafalgar Park, Trafalgar Street, Nelson. Adults $25, Child (5-15) $5, Child under 5 Free [plus TicketDirect service fees]. Tickets from Ticketdirect, Theatre Royal, iSITE ph.

03 548 3840; 0800 224 224.

Dovedale Country Affair Festival

Sunday 14th February 2016 Celebrate Valentine's at the Dovedale Country Affair. Enjoy a real country occasion with entertainment and lots of free activities for the whole family.

With live music all day and so much to see and do, you'll want to make a day of it. Ample parking, including disabled parking, with a shuttle bus between the Hall, Church and Reserve for those needing assistance. Cash EFTPOS facility for a small fee. Entry is $2 for adults, children free. Please NO DOGS.

11am - 4pm, Dovedale Recreational Reserve, Dovedale Road, Adult $2

All Vinyl Rock and Roll Night!

Friday 19th February 2016

Come and celebrate the best of Rock and Roll on the format it was supposed to be heard on...VINYL! DJ Elrolio has over 2000 pieces of Vinyl on site here at The Playhouse, so you better believe there will be variety and great tunes.

Doors open 6pm, Vinyl from 7pm.

FREE TO ALL. The PlayHouse Cafe and Theatre, 171 Westdale Road, Mapua

2016 Tasman Bay Snapper Classic

Saturday 20th February 2016 A one day team’s fishing competition in Tasman Bay with massive prizes up for grabs. Average Weight Snapper winner gets a $10,000 DNA Boat and Honda Marine 4 stroke engine.

Fresh filleted snapper fillets will be auctioned with 100% of the money raised going to Coastguard Nelson.

Grab your mates and get a team of 4 people together to enter and have a chance of 10's of thousands of dollars of prizes. Fishing starts from 5am, Weigh in from 12pm - 4pm, Public Fish Auction 4pm - 5pm, Prize giving 5pm -6pm, Band playing until late.

The Speights Ale House Nelson, 99 Quarantine Rd, Annesbrook, Nelson 7011. $200 for Team of 4. Tickets from Ticketing Website ph. 0273122911.

Brightwater Wine & Food Festival (BWFF)

Sunday 21st February 2016 BWFF celebrates sensational sounds, wine, food, and summer. Hold onto your summer holiday groove, grab family and friends and head to the Brightwater Wine & Food Festival, for all-day music & entertainment, fantastic food, and award-winning wine and beer. Enjoy fun for all ages... including the Kids. Plenty of free parking, Motor Homes welcome. Alternately Bus from Nelson/Richmond or ride directly to the venue via the Great Tasman Cycle Trail. 11.00am – 5.00pm, Middle- Earth Vineyards, Bryant Road, Brightwater. Also Bus from Nelson or bike the Great Tasman Cycle Trail.

EarlyBird $15, Gate Sales $20, Under 12yr Free. No BYO, No Food, No Pets. Tickets from our website www.bwff.co.nz

PLEASE NOTE: What’s On is for one-off events in Nelson and Tasman that are likely to be of interest to Mudcakes & Roses readers. Most of the information is taken from the regional events database – www.itson.co.nz and preference for inclusion is given to community events. Details of regular events and activities that used to feature on this page can now be found in the Recreation & Service Directory.

I needed help to feel confident in my home again - Access was there.

Janet

Make yourself at home with Access

Whether you require nursing services, personal care or even just a hand around the house, our fully qualified team supports you to live

independently in your community.

Talk to your GP or give us a call on

0800 284 663.

References

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