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The Mackay Region is the gateway to the rich coal deposits in the Bowen and Galilee Basins

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DISCLAIMER

All figures and data presented in this document are based on data sourced from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), and other government agencies. Using ABS datasets, the regional economic modelling software ‘REMPLAN Economy’, has been applied to generate industrial economic data estimates. This document is provided in good faith with every effort made to provide accurate data and apply comprehensive knowledge. However, REMPLAN does not guarantee the accuracy of data nor the conclusions drawn from this information.

Economic Development Department 1300 MACKAY (622 529)

[email protected] www.investmackay.com

(07) 5689 1499 / (03) 5444 4788 www.remplan.com.au

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OVERVIEW

INDUSTRY DEMOGRAPHICS

EMPLOYMENT

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HOUSING

TOURISM

TRENDS

RESOURCES

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The region’s expanding employment, investment and development opportunities, buoyant economy and lifestyle attributes are just some of the many positive aspects that encourage people to live, work and play in the Mackay Region. The Mackay Regional Local Government Area is one of the fastest-growing in Queensland, with a population of 118,000.

The region’s growth is fuelled by activity in the resources sector, resurgence in agribusiness, and growth in construction, logistics and tourism. The Mackay Region is the gateway to the rich coal deposits in the Bowen and Galilee Basins. It is one of the largest sugar-producing regions in Australia and hosts much of the engineering, manufacturing and mining services industries supporting the wider Mackay-Isaac-Whitsunday economy.

Only an hour’s flight from Brisbane, the Mackay Region boasts an enviable lifestyle and a buoyant economy with the benefits of a fast-growing coastal city. Its coastal location is complemented by its spectacular natural environment. This includes 31 beaches, a picturesque blue river and a pristine rainforest hinterland.

This website presents economic and demographic data for the Mackay Region. For further information on the Mackay Region, please contact the Mackay Regional Council’s Economic Development team – phone:

1300 622 529 or (07) 4961 9530.

The industry sectors which are the key drivers of the Mackay Region’s economy in terms of regional exports, employment, value-added and local expenditure on goods and services (backward linkages) are recognised as key propulsive

industries. At the 114 industry sector level, the industry sectors which ‘ranked’ in the top 10 in terms of regional exports, employment, value- added and local expenditure on goods and services (backward linkages) are:

Mackay Region Wholesale Trade

Pre-School, Primary, Secondary & Special Education Construction Services

Coal Mining

Health Care Services

Public Administration & Regulatory Services Professional, Scientific & Technical Services Retail Trade

Sugar & Confectionery Manufactiring

> GRP - $7.540b

> Population – 117,703

> Strong population growth forecast, heading

towards 170,000 over the coming decades

> Gateway to the Bowen and Galilee Basins

> Located an hour’s flight to Brisbane

> Great Barrier Reef located just off shore

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2007

106,026

The estimated resident population in the Mackay Region as at June 30, 2016 is 117,703 people. Between 2006 and 2016 the Mackay Region (estimated resident) population increased by 14,136 people (13.6%), with an average annual compound population growth of 1.3% between 2006 and 2016.

95,000 100,000 105,000 110,000 115,000 120,000 125,000

2006

103,567

2008

108,644

2009

111,455

2010

113,699

2011

115,960

2012

117,603

2013

119,076

2014

119,272

2015

118,771

2016

117,703

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Between 2006 and 2016, the population of the Mackay Region increased by 14,136 people. The majority of population increase during this time occurred in Eimeo-Rural View, which increased by 5,475 people, an annual average increase of 5.8%. Pioneer Valley (+3,055) and Ooralea - Bakers Creek (+1,873) experienced the next highest levels of population increase over the last ten years. Slade Point closely followed by North Mackay experienced the largest declines between 2006 and 2016.

Source: ABS, Estimated Resident Population, 3218.0, Table 3.

Population (ERP JUNE 30) Population Change (Ann. Avg)

Statistical Area Level 2 2006 2011 2016 06-11 11-16 06-16

Andergrove - Beaconsfield 14,349 14,835 15,259 0.7% 0.6% 0.6%

East Mackay 3,771 3,755 3,652 -0.1% -0.6% -0.3%

Eimeo - Rural View 7,301 10,201 12,776 6.9% 4.6% 5.8%

Eungella Hinterland 0 4 16 - 32.0% -

Mackay 3,917 4,212 3,740 1.5% -2.3% -0.5%

Mackay Harbour 396 539 527 6.4% -0.4% 2.9%

Mount Pleasant - Glenella 9,485 11,074 11,004 3.1% -0.1% 1.5%

North Mackay 6,670 6,989 6,158 0.9% -2.5% -0.8%

Ooralea - Bakers Creek 3,260 4,230 5,133 5.3% 3.9% 4.6%

Pioneer Valley 5,345 7,234 8,400 6.2% 3.0% 4.6%

Sarina 10,969 11,857 11,796 1.6% -0.1% 0.7%

Seaforth - Calen 8,050 8,587 8,214 1.3% -0.9% 0.2%

Shoal Point - Bucasia 4,583 5,470 5,905 3.6% 1.5% 2.6%

Slade Point 3,951 3,982 3,419 0.2% -3.0% -1.4%

South Mackay 7,234 7,636 6,849 1.1% -2.2% -0.5%

Walkerston - Eton 7,849 8,595 8,497 1.8% -0.2% 0.8%

West Mackay 6,437 6,760 6,358 1.0% -1.2% -0.1%

Mackay Region 103,567 115,960 117,703 2.3% 0.3% 1.3%

Between 2006 and 2016, the population of the

Mackay Region increased by 14,136 people

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Queensland Government population projections, 2015 edition (medium series) were released in April 2016.

Between 2016 and 2036, the population of the Mackay Region is projected to increase by 44,943 people.

The average annual projected population growth between 2016 and 2036 of 1.5% is higher than the average growth rate experienced over the previous 10 years (1.3%). Apart from Eungella Hinterland (which has a large increase from a small population base), between 2016 and 2036, the highest growth is projected for Ooralea – Bakers Creek (3.5%) which is projected to increase by approximately 4,956 people from 2016 to 2036.

POPULATION PROJECTIONS – MACKAY (R)

Statistical Area Level 2 2016 2021 2026 2031 2036 Avg Annual Change 2016-2026 2026-2036

Andergrove - Beaconsfield 16,298 17,680 18,447 19,666 21,548 1.2% 1.6%

East Mackay 3,900 4,110 4,397 4,576 4,628 1.2% 0.5%

Eimeo - Rural View 12,297 14,950 17,648 19,765 22,853 3.7% 2.6%

Eungella Hinterland 3 5 8 13 19 10.3% 9.0%

Mackay 4,463 4,717 5,122 5,832 6,213 1.4% 1.9%

Mackay Harbour 539 549 589 669 687 0.9% 1.6%

Mount Pleasant - Glenella 12,030 12,753 13,800 14,807 15,516 1.4% 1.2%

North Mackay 7,341 7,468 7,687 8,012 8,145 0.5% 0.6%

Ooralea - Bakers Creek 5,090 6,084 7,246 8,732 10,046 3.6% 3.3%

Pioneer Valley 8,737 9,403 10,432 11,635 13,965 1.8% 3.0%

Sarina 12,615 13,000 13,984 15,131 15,775 1.0% 1.2%

Seaforth - Calen 8,738 8,924 9,333 9,790 10,119 0.7% 0.8%

Shoal Point - Bucasia 6,202 6,834 7,827 9,220 10,390 2.4% 2.9%

Slade Point 4,049 4,126 4,284 4,428 4,540 0.6% 0.6%

South Mackay 7,943 8,082 8,180 8,307 8,411 0.3% 0.3%

Walkerston - Eton 9,188 9,429 9,742 10,135 10,480 0.6% 0.7%

West Mackay 6,940 7,196 7,542 7,746 7,978 0.8% 0.6%

Mackay Region 126,373 135,310 146,268 158,464 171,313 1.5% 1.6%

POPULATION PROJECTIONS BY AGE COHORT – MACKAY (R)

0-14 15-29 30-49 50-64 65-79 80+ Total

2016 26,818 25,352 36,077 23,537 11,300 3,286 126,370

2021 28,825 25,717 38,263 25,161 13,501 3,845 135,312

2026 30,560 27,672 41,067 26,202 15,987 4,782 146,269

2031 32,507 29,985 44,335 27,432 18,027 6,178 158,464

2036 34,727 32,289 46,967 29,803 19,773 7,754 171,313

2016-2036 7,909 6,937 10,890 6,266 8,473 4,468 44,943

Source: Queensland Government population projections 2015 edition; (medium series), by Statistical Area 2 (SA2), SA3 and SA4 Queensland, 2011 to 2036.

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From 2016 to 2036, the Mackay LGA is projected to be the 9th largest growing LGA from a total of 78 LGAs in Queensland.

0

0 10,000

20,000 20,000

40,000 30,000

60,000 40,000

80,000 50,000

100,000 120,000 140,000 160,000 180,000

0-14

26,818 30,560 34,727

Gold Coast Ipswich Brisbane Logan Moreton Townsville Cairns Mackay Toowoomba

Bay

Sunshine Coast

135,753 168,230

15-29

25,352 27,672 32,289

109,953 178,584

30-49

36,077 41,067 46,967

128,380 97,079128,488 89,337 72,543 73,241106,068 86,055

50-64

23,537 26,202 29,803

65-79

11,300 15,987 19,773

42,514 30,501 19,899 19,143

46,721 33,572 25,044 20,714

80+

3,286 4,782 7,754

2016 2026 2036

2016 - 2026 2026 - 2036

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Analysis of the community profile of the Mackay Region in 2016 compared to the Mackay – Isaac – Whitsunday Statistical Area 4 (SA4) (comprising the Mackay, Isaac and Whitsunday LGAs), shows that the age structures are in line with one another.

Overall, 20.7% of the population was aged between 0 and 14, and 18.8% was aged 60 years and over, compared with 20.7% and 18.1%, respectively for the Mackay – Isaac – Whitsunday SA4.

The major differences between the age

structure of the Mackay region and the Mackay - Isaac - Whitsunday SA4 were:

> A smaller percentage of 25 to 34 year olds (13.5% compared to 14.6%);

> A larger percentage of 70 to 84 year olds (7.2%

compared to 6.7%)

Between 2011 and 2016, the population increased by 2,173 people (1.9%). The largest changes in age structure in this area between 2011 and 2016 were in the age groups:

> 60 to 69 (+2,043 persons);

> 35 to 49 (-1,555 persons);

> 70 to 75 (+1,511 persons); and

> 50 to 54 (+1,287 persons).

CHANGE IN POPULATION - 2011 - 2016 Change in Persons -2000

85+

-1000 0 500 1,000 2,000 3,000 70 to 84

70 to 84 60 to 69

60 to 69 50 to 59

50 to 59 35 to 49

35 to 49 25 to 34

25 to 34 20 to 24

20 to 24 15 to 19

15 to 19 10 to 14

10 to 14 5 to 9 0 to 4

370

1,511 2,043 -1,555

-375

-573 -483

418 -233

1,287 -237

0 85+

5 to 9 0 to 4

1.4%

7.2%

10.1%

14.2%

20.7%

13.5%

5.8%

6.3%

6.8%

7.1%

6.7%

1.3%

6.7%

10.1%

14.0%

20.9%

14.6%

6.0%

5.9%

6.5%

7.3%

6.9%

25 20

15 10

5

PROPORTION OF POPULATION (%) Mackay Region Mackay (SA4)

Growth driven

by retirees

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Analysis of the qualifications of the population in the Mackay Region in 2016 compared to the Mackay - Isaac - Whitsunday (SA4) shows that these are in line with one another.

Overall, 34.7% of the population held educational qualifications, and 55.7% had no qualifications, compared with 34.2% and 54.7%, respectively for the Mackay - Isaac - Whitsunday (SA4).

The largest changes in the qualifications of the population of the Mackay Region between 2011 and 2016 were in those with:

> No qualifications (-2,989 persons);

> Vocational qualifications (+2,258 persons);

and

> Advanced Diploma or Diploma (+1,160 persons).

Analysis of individual income levels in the Mackay Region in 2016 compared to the Mackay - Isaac - Whitsunday (SA4) shows that there was a similar proportion of persons earning a high income (those earning $1,500 per week or more) and a higher proportion of low income persons (those earning less than $400 per week).

Overall, 18.3% of the population earned a high income, and 27.3% earned a low income, compared with 18.4% and 25.8%, respectively for the Mackay - Isaac - Whitsunday (SA4).

PROPORTION OF POPULATION (%) Mackay Region Mackay (SA4) 0

$2,000 or more Not Stated

$1,500- $1,999

$1,250- $1,499

$1,000- $1,249

$800-$999

$650-$799

$400-$599

$500-$649

$300-$399

$150-$299

$1-$149 Negative / Nil

9.3%

11.2%

9.0%

5.6%

7.9%

7.8%

7.2%

7.4%

7.4%

7.6%

6.6%

4.0%

9.1%

9.8%

12.9%

8.6%

5.3%

7.8%

7.9%

7.4%

7.3%

7.2%

7.3%

6.2%

3.8%

8.5%

10 12

8 6 4 2 PROPORTION OF POPULATION (%)

Mackay Region Mackay (SA4) 0

No Qualification

Not Stated Vocational Bachelor or

Higher Degree Advanced Diploma or

55.7%

9.6%

21.2%

7.5%

5.9%

54.7%

11.1%

20.9%

7.3%

6.0%

50 60 40

30 20 10

Change in Persons

CHANGE IN QUALIFICATIONS - 2011 - 2016

-4,000 -2,000 0 1,000 3,000

586 -2,989

2,258 1,160 1,158

QualificationNo Not Stated Vocational Bachelor or Higher Degree Advanced

Diploma

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Analysis of the family types in the Mackay Region in 2016 compared to the Mackay - Isaac - Whitsunday (SA4) shows that there was a higher proportion of one parent and other families.

Overall, 15.1% of families were one parent families, and 1.3% were other families, compared with 14.5% and 1.2%, respectively for the Mackay - Isaac - Whitsunday (SA4).

There was an net increase of 3,625 families in the Mackay Region between 2006 and 2016, the largest changes were:

> Couple families with no children (+1,998 families); and

> One Parent families (+1,026 families).

NUMBER OF FAMILIES

0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000

88

1,026 513

1,998

PROPORTION OF FAMILIES (%) Mackay Region Mackay (SA4) 0

Other family Other family

One parent

family One parent

family Couple family

with no children Couple family

with no children Couple family

with children Couple family

with children

1.3%

15.1%

40.3%

43.3%

1.2%

14.5%

40.7%

43.6%

50 40 30 20 10

CHANGE IN POPULATION - 2006 - 2016

43.3% of Mackay’s

families have children

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Analysis of the dwellings in the Mackay Region in 2016 compared to the Mackay - Isaac - Whitsunday (SA4) shows that there was a larger proportion of dwellings owned outright or are being paid off and a smaller proportion which were rented.

Overall, 26.9% of Mackay’s dwellings are owned outright; 33.7% owned with a mortgage, and 28.4% being rented, compared with 26.7%, 29.8%

and 31.9%, respectively for the Mackay - Isaac - Whitsunday (SA4).

The largest changes in dwelling tenure categories for the dwellings in the Mackay Region between 2011 and 2016 were:

> Renting (+1,339 dwellings);

> Mortgage (+459 dwellings); and

> Fully owned (-160 households).

PROPORTION OF DWELLINGS (%) Mackay Region Mackay (SA4) 0

Other tenure type Not stated Renting Mortgage Fully owned

2.2%

8.8%

28.4%

33.7%

26.9%

1.0%

10.6%

31.9%

29.8%

26.7%

25 30 35

20 15 10 5

PROPORTION OF DWELLINGS (%) Mackay Region Mackay (SA4) 0

Caravan, cabin Other Not stated High density Medium density Separate house

2.7%

0.7%

0.1%

1.2%

13.8%

81.5%

4.2%

1.1%

0.2%

1.3%

14.2%

79.0%

40 50 60 70 80

30 20 10

In 2016, there were 41,140 separate houses in the Mackay Region, 1,512 medium density dwellings and 604 high density dwellings.

Analysis of the types of dwellings in the Mackay Region in 2016 compared to the Mackay - Isaac - Whitsunday (SA4) shows that 81.5% were separate houses, 13.8% were medium density dwellings and 1.2% were high density dwellings, compared with 79.0%, 14.2% and 1.3%, respectively in the Mackay - Isaac - Whitsunday (SA4).

There was an increase of 4,950 dwellings in the Mackay Region between 2011 and 2016. The largest changes in the type of dwellings were:

> Separate house (+3,456 dwellings); and

> Medium density (+1,512 dwellings).

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Socio Economic Indexes for Areas (SEIFA) is a suite of indexes that have been created by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) from social and economic Census information.

Each index ranks geographic areas across Australia in terms of their relative socio-economic advantage and disadvantage. This report presents information from the Index of Relative Socio-economic Disadvantage (IRSD), a general socio-economic index that summarises a range of information about the economic and social conditions of people and households within an area. This index includes only measures of relative disadvantage.

SEIFA DISADVANTAGE

2016 Suburbs Score National

Rank 2016 Suburbs Score National

Rank 2016 Suburbs Score National

Rank

PagetSSC 31284 907 1,033/8,248 Beaconsfield (QLD) SSC 30123 999 3,697/8,248 Campwin Beach SSC 30308 1,046 5,913/8,248 Midge PointSSC 31053 916 1,165/8,248 Hay PointSSC 30737 999 3,704/8,248 WalkerstonSSC 31712 1,046 5,919/8,248 Bloomsbury SSC 30182 927 1,388/8,248 Te KowaiSSC 31593 1,004 3,924/8,248 Mt Pleasant (Mky-Qld)SSC 31158 1,051 6,126/8,248 Finch HattonSSC 30607 929 1,428/8,248 East MackaySSC 30540 1,006 4,008/8,248 Sarina BeachSSC 31455 1,051 6,128/8,248 Eungella(QLD)SSC 30587 936 1,586/8,248 Armstrong BeachSSC 30055 1,007 4,054/8,248 Alexandra(QLD) SSC 30018 1,055 6,302/8,248 MackaySSC 30988 943 1,773/8,248 BalberraSSC 30084 1,009 4,140/8,248 DumbletonSSC 30517 1,055 6,304/8,248 CalenSSC 30293 946 1,857/8,248 Alligator Creek(Mky-Qld) SSC 30025 1,010 4,192/8,248 PleystoweSSC 31337 1,055 6,311/8,248 Seaforth(Qld) SSC 31462 965 2,420/8,248 Pinnacle (Qld)SSC 31330 1,010 4,202/8,248 Mackay HarbourSSC 39089 1,056 6,348/8,248

Mackay 121

1,018

1,000 1,193

Least disadvantaged

Most disadvantaged

(17)

The local government area of Mackay achieved a score of 987 and ranked 318 out of 564 local government areas with SEIFA scores in Australia. This implies there are 132 local government areas less disadvantaged and 317 local government areas more disadvantaged. Of 78 suburbs located within Mackay, the least disadvantaged suburb was Richmond (Mackay – QLD) (103) followed by Nindaroo (1,117). The most disadvantaged suburb was Cremorne (QLD) at a score of 856.

Mackay’s least disadvantaged suburbs appear concentrated in the centre of the local government area.

Of Mackay’s population, 12.1% were aged between 15 and 24 years of age. Of these persons, 14.0%

were identified as Disengaged Youth (persons not employed or engaged in education) which is higher than the state at 11.5% of young adults.

Of Mackay’s population, 5.1% identified as either Aboriginal and / or Torres Strait Islander at the time of the 2016 Census.

SEIFA DISADVANTAGE cont.

2016 Suburbs Score National

Rank 2016 Suburbs Score National

Rank 2016 Suburbs Score National

Rank

Bakers Creek (Qld)SSC 30083 968 2,517/8,248 KuttabulSSC 30916 1,011 4,246/8,248 Victoria PlainsSSC 31702 1,064 6,692/8,248 SarinaSSC 31454 968 2,523/8,248 Homebush (Qld)SSC 30770 1,014 4,381/8,248 EimeoSSC 30556 1,065 6,735/8,248 Laguna QuaysSSC 30921 973 2,690/8,248 Palmyra (Qld)SSC 31294 1,018 4,590/8,248 MarianSSC 31016 1,067 6,811/8,248

KoumalaSSC 30903 980 2,924/8,248 Mackay (R) 1,018 432/564 OoraleaSSC 31269 1,073 7,039/8,248

South MackaySSC 31500 980 2,929/8,248 AndergroveSSC 30039 1,019 4,628/8,248 BalnagowanSSC 30093 1,074 7,079/8,248 St Helens BeachSSC 31527 982 3,000/8,248 Freshwater PointSSC 30630 1,020 4,677/8,248 HabanaSSC 30719 1,076 7,134/8,248 Ball BaySSC 30088 983 3,034/8,248 Hampden (Qld)SSC 30726 1,020 4,680/8,248 The LeapSSC 31615 1,076 7,138/8,248 North MackaySSC 31244 985 3,117/8,248 MunburaSSC 31181 1,020 4,687/8,248 Shoal PointSSC 31476 1,078 7,206/8,248 Mount MartinSSC 31244 986 3,151/8,248 North EtonSSC 31240 1,020 4,688/8,248 Blacks BeachSSC 30175 1,082 7,321/8,248 YalborooSSC 31834 987 3,190/8,248 DunnrockSSC 30523 1,021 4,722/8,248 ErakalaSSC 30574 1,083 7,356/8,248 Sarina RangeSSC 31456 989 3,279/8,248 Mount JukesSSC 31135 1,025 4,901/8,248 Rural ViewSSC 31442 1,084 7,391/8,248 Slade PointSSC 31485 989 3,281/8,248 SandifordSSC 31451 1,028 5,034/8,248 Greenmount(Mky-Qld) SSC 30702 1,088 7,522/8,248 GargettSSC 30634 991 3,358/8,248 McEwens BeachSSC 31029 1,031 5,190/8,248 GlenellaSSC 30663 1,091 7,608/8,248 Mount PelionSSC 31156 995 3,515/8,248 RacecourseSSC 31368 1,032 5,238/8,248 Richmond (Mky-Qld)SSC 31397 1,104 7,899/8,248 MiraniSSC 31069 997 3,615/8,248 Grasstree BeachSSC 30698 1,036 5,451/8,248 Dolphin HeadsSSC 30500 1,108 7,949/8,248 EtonSSC 30579 998 3,659/8,248 OakendenSSC 31261 1,037 5,505/8,248 Coral Sea (Gladstone-Qld) SSC 30429 No score Mount OssaSSC 31155 998 3,662/8,248 FarleighSSC 30598 1,044 5,816/8,248 CreditonSSC 30445 No score West MackaySSC 31750 998 3,665/8,248 BucasiaSSC 30250 1,045 5,854/8,248 CremorneSSC 30446 No score

37%

23.5%

6.9

%

18.6%

14%

87.1%

7.8

% 5.1

%

> DISENGAGED YOUTH 14%

> YOUTH ENGAGED IN EMPLOYMENT 37%

> YOUTH ENGAGED IN EDUCATION 23.5%

> YOUTH ENGAGED IN EDUCATION AND EMPLOYMENT 18.6%

> NOT STATED (fully or partially not stated) 6.9%

> INDIGENOUS 5.1%

> NON-INDIGENOUS 87.1%

> NOT STATED 7.8%

(18)
(19)

The following graphs illustrate the profile of employed people whose place of work is located within the Mackay Region, which includes residents and non-residents.

The total employment estimate for the Mackay Region as at the 2016 Census was 47,975 jobs.

The ‘Health Care and Social Assistance’ industry sector comprised 5,948 jobs; followed by ‘Retail Trade’ (5,454 jobs) and ‘Education & Training’

(4,038 jobs).

Compared to the Mackay - Isaac - Whitsunday (SA4) and State averages, the Mackay Region has a distinct representation across all occupations, with a higher representation of ‘Clerical and Administrative Workers’.

JOBS 0

Arts and Recreational Services

Information Media and Telecommunications Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services Financial and Insurance Services

Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services Administrative and Support Services

Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing Public Administration and Safety

Wholesale Trade

Professional, Scientific and Technical Mining

309 446

517 883

2,623

1,873 2,045

2,407 2,199

758 1,536

5,000 4,000

3,000 6,000

2,000 1,000

Other Services

Accommodation and Food Services Transport, Postal and Warehousing

Construction Manufacturing

2,715 3,337

3,357 3,988

5,454 5,948

3,542 4,038

PROPORTION OF WORKFORCE (%) Work in Mackay (R)

Work in Queensland (State)

Work in Mackay - Isaac - Whitsunday (SA4)

0 Not stated - Inadequately described Labourers Machinery

Operators and Drivers

Sales Workers

Clerical and Admin Workers Community and Personal Service Technicians

and Trade Workers Professionals Managers

0.6%

11.0%

16.4%

8.1%

10.9%

8.7%

20.0%

13.1%

11.1%

0.5%

10.7%

9.2%

10.2%

13.8%

10.0%

18.3%

16.0%

11.4%

0.8%

10.5%

6.8%

9.9%

13.7%

11.7%

14.2%

20.3%

12.1%

20 25

15 10

5 Education and Training

Retail Trade

Health Care and Social Assistance

(20)

Work in Mackay - Isaac - Whitsunday (SA4)

The workforce age profile for the Mackay Region shows a lower proportion of workers in younger age groups (20-44 years) compared to the Mackay - Isaac - Whitsunday (SA4) and State benchmarks.

PROPORTION OF WORKFORCE (%) Work in Mackay (R)

0 Over 75 - 84 65 - 74 55 - 64 45 - 54 35 - 44 25 - 34 20 - 24 15 - 19

0.0%

0.2%

2.8%

15.1%

22.9%

22.5%

22.6%

8.5%

5.4%

0.0%

0.3%

2.7%

16.2%

23.1%

20.9%

21.1%

9.0%

6.7%

0.0%

0.4%

3.5%

14.9%

21.9%

22.0%

21.8%

9.7%

5.9%

20 25

15 10

5

Between the 2011 and 2016 Census periods, there was a net increase of 3,205 jobs in the Mackay Region, building on the 44,770 jobs in 2011.

‘Health Care & Social Assistance’ increased by 1,352 jobs becoming the largest employing sector in Mackay in 2016. ‘Manufacturing’ declined by 1,300 jobs between 2011 and 2016.

-1,000

Arts and Recreational Services

Information Media and Telecommunications Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services

Financial and Insurance Services

Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services Administrative and Support Services

Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing Public Administration and Safety

Wholesale Trade

Professional, Scientific and Technical Mining

-1,300 -320 -307 -94

171

14 54

115 66

-141 -19

4,000 3,000

2,000 1,000

0

Other Services

Accommodation and Food Services Education and Training

Transport, Postal and Warehousing

Construction

Health Care & Social Assistance

Manufacturing Retail Trade 220

317 322

470 963 1,352

397 925

TOTAL: 3,205

JOBS Work in Queensland

(State)

(21)

One fifth of workers in the Mackay Region work between 35 to 39 hours. Mackay’s workforce has a tendency to work less hours than Mackay – Isaac – Whitsunday (SA4) but tends to work longer hours compared to the State with 18.8% of the workforce stating they work hours beyond a standard full-time workload.

PROPORTION OF WORKFORCE (%) Mackay Region

Queensland (State)

Mackay - Isaac - Whitsunday (SA4) 0

Not Stated/Not Applicable

49 hrs + 41-48

hrs 40 hrs 35-39

hrs 25-34

hrs 16-24

hrs 1-15

hrs 0 hrs

1.1%

11.5%

13.6%

16.0%

10.1%

7.2%

8.8%

4.0%

1.0%

18.8%

10.5%

15.5%

20.0%

11.5%

8.8%

10.7%

3.2%

1.0%

16.5%

9.6%

17.3%

19.4%

12.2%

9.5%

11.1%

3.4%

20 25 30

15 10 5

Of the 47,975 jobs in the Mackay Region, 43,997 (91.7%) reside in the Mackay Region. Over 99%

of the workforce uses the following methods of travel to work in the Mackay Region. Approximately 80.5% of workers travel by car (either as driver or passenger), 4.6% worked at home and 2.2%

walked.

JOBS 0

Car and Other Bus

Bicycle

Motorbike / scooter Truck

Worked at home Car, as passenger

Did not go to work

Walked only

106 187 292 312 312

1,071 2,200

2,487 4,434

35,000 25,000

15,000 5,000

36,133 Car, as driver

27.8%

3,205 additional jobs between

2011 and 2016

(22)

GRP:

$7.540 Billion

(23)

Gross Regional Product (GRP) is the total value of final goods and services produced in the region over the period of one year. This includes exports but subtracts imports.

GRP can be measured by adding up all forms of final expenditure. These include:

> consumption by households

> consumption by governments

> additions or increases to assets (minus disposals)

> exports (minus imports)

The Mackay regional gross product for 2017 was $7.540 billion. This represents 47.3% of Mackay - Isaac - Whitsunday (SA4) gross regional product and 2.3% of Queensland’s gross product. For the last seven years, Mackay has experienced positive growth in GRP and mostly positive growth in gross regional product per capita increasing from $55,176 in 2010 to $65,581 in 2017.

$0.00 2011

$52,000

$50,000

$1,000

$54,000

$2,000

$56,000

$3,000

$58,000

$4,000

$60,000

$5,000

$62,000

$6,000

$64,000

$7,000

$8,000

2010

$5,573.63 $6,112.74

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

$6,541.19 $6,624.33 $6,756.17 $7,225.93$6,961.66 $7,539.85

GRP ($M) Per Capita ($’000)

Gross Regional Product Per Capita GRP ($’000)

GRP ($M)

Output ($M)

Value Added

($M)

Regional Exports

($M)

Regional Imports

($M) Mackay Region $7,539.852 - $15,487.072 - $7,016.866 - $5,065.165 - $3,615.109 - Mackay - Isaac -

Whitsunday $15,928.643 47.3% $34,615.045 44.7% $15,129.209 46.4% $17,697.544 28.6% $10,840.847 33.3%

Queensland $326,995.000 2.3% $661,089.887 2.3% $305,603.214 2.3% $105,697.239 4.8% $99,261.172 3.6%

The Gross Regional Product for Mackay (R) was calculated using the Expenditure method

(24)

VALUE-ADDED ($M) 0

Arts and Recreational Services

Information Media & Telecommunications Electricity, Gas, Water & Waste Services Financial and Insurance Services

Administrative and Support Services Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing

Public Administration and Safety Wholesale Trade

Professional, Scientific and Technical Mining

$28.720

$70.890

$196.060

$204.280

$259.790

$267.080

$297.900

800 1,000

600 400

200

Other Services

Accommodation and Food Services Education and Training

Transport, Postal &

Warehousing Health Care & Social Assistance

Retail Trade

$588.820

$843.490

Manufacturing

$990.390

$508.800

$511.520

Rental, Hiring & Real Estate Services

$361.420

$502.090

$359.270

$354.300

$299.540

$183.830

$188.680

Output data represents the gross revenue

generated by businesses / organisations in each of the industry sectors in a defined region.

The output generated by the Mackay regional economy is estimated at $15.487 billion.

‘Manufacturing’ accounts for $2.585 billion followed by ‘Mining’ ($2.032 billion) and ‘Construction’

($1.843 billion).

Value-added data represents the marginal economic value that is added by each industry sector in a defined region. Value-added can be calculated by subtracting local expenditure and expenditure on regional imports from the output generated by an industry sector, or alternatively, by adding the Wages & Salaries paid to local employees, the gross operating surplus and taxes on products and production. Value-added by industry sector is the major element in the calculation of Gross Regional Product.

The total value-added by the Mackay regional economy is estimated at $7.017 billion. ‘Rental, Hiring & Real Estate Services’ contributes the highest value-added ($990.390 million), followed by ‘Mining’ ($843.490 million) and ‘Construction’

($588.820 million).

OUTPUT ($M) 0

Arts and Recreational Services

Information Media & Telecommunications Electricity, Gas, Water & Waste Services

Financial and Insurance Services Rental, Hiring & Real Estate Services

Administrative and Support Services Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing

Public Administration and Safety Wholesale Trade

Professional, Scientific and Technical Mining

$78.091

$171.436

$378.651

$388.692

$392.034

$446.128

$463.417

$463.491

$473.489

$552.324

$579.937

$587.929

$691.889

$721.855

3,000 2,000 2,500

1,500 1,000

500

Other Services

Accommodation and Food Services Education and Training

Transport, Postal and Warehousing Construction

Health Care and Social Assistance

Retail Trade

$2,032.416

$2,584.782 Manufacturing

$1,503.483

$1,842.936

$1,134.093

Construction

(25)

800 1,000 600

400 200

Local Expenditure data represents the value of intermediate goods and services purchased by local industry sectors within the region. A high level of local expenditure on intermediate goods and services proportionate to total output is indicative of well-developed local supply chains and also that any expansion in this sector would typically deliver broad based benefits for the region’s economy.

The total local expenditure estimate for Mackay is $4.855 billion. The ‘Construction’ sector has the highest level of local expenditure, purchasing

$935.536 million on locally sourced goods and services.

Regional Exports data represents the value of goods and services exported outside of the region that have been generated by industry sectors within the region. The graph on the bottom depicts the contribution to total regional exports generated by each of the industry sectors ranked from highest to lowest.

The total regional export estimate for the Mackay Region is $5.065 billion. The ‘Mining’ sector has the highest level of regional exports of $1.857 billion, followed by ‘Manufacturing’ ($1.378 billion) and ‘Transport, Postal & Warehousing’ ($415.833 million).

LOCAL EXPENDITURE ($M) 0

Arts and Recreational Services

Information Media & Telecommunications Electricity, Gas, Water & Waste Services

Financial and Insurance Services Rental, Hiring & Real Estate Services

Administrative and Support Services Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing

Public Administration and Safety Wholesale Trade

Professional, Scientific and Technical Mining

$27.308

$48.811

$65.229

$93.891

$110.521

$116.768

$126.928

$127.898

$128.049

$140.593

$153.150

$168.745

$175.482

Other Services

Accommodation and Food Services

Education and Training

Transport, Postal and Warehousing

Health Care and Social Assistance Retail Trade

$690.427

$785.366 Manufacturing

$935.536

$306.099

$417.162

Construction

REGIONAL EXPORTS ($M) 0

Arts and Recreational Services

Information Media & Telecommunications Electricity, Gas, Water & Waste Services

Financial and Insurance Services Rental, Hiring & Real Estate Services

Administrative and Support Services Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing

Public Administration and Safety Wholesale Trade

Professional, Scientific and Technical Manufacturing

$1.894

$2.422

$8.772

$8.960

$21.981

$23.632

$25.378

$49.150

$51.241

$83.405

$111.870

$131.255

$153.127

$209.381

2,000 1,500

1,000 500

Other Services

Accommodation and Food Services Education and Training

Transport, Postal and Warehousing

Health Care and Social Assistance Retail Trade

$415.833

$1,377.725

Mining

$1,857.435

$256.605

$275.100

Construction

$237.136

Local Expenditure:

$4.855 Billion

(26)

Regional Imports data represents the value of goods and services imported from outside of the region. Imports are necessary for many reasons and the following graph depicts the value of sector dependency on total regional imports by each of the industry sectors ranked from highest to lowest.

The total regional import estimate for Mackay is $3.615 billion. The ‘Manufacturing’ sector represented 35.6% of total imports with a value of

$1.288 billion.

Within the ‘Manufacturing’ sector, the ‘Food Product Manufacturing’ sector imports $430.254 million (11.9% of total region imports) followed by

‘Technical Equipment & Appliance Manufacturing’ at

$273.265 million (7.6% of total region imports).

Imports reflect demand in the area’s economy for goods and services not supplied locally and therefore represent ‘Gaps’ in local supply chains. Imports from the rest of Australia have the potential to reflect opportunities for import replacement, increased value-adding and supply chain development. See ‘Import Replacement Opportunities’.

REGIONAL IMPORTS ($M) 0

Arts and Recreational Services

Information Media & Telecommunications

Electricity, Gas, Water & Waste Services Financial and Insurance Services

Rental, Hiring & Real Estate Services

Administrative and Support Services Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing

Public Administration and Safety Wholesale Trade

Professional, Scientific and Technical Mining

$22.061

$36.826

$46.838

$51.737

$67.649

$69.407

$71.703

$79.279

$80.153

$85.046

$117.048

$119.641

$122.166

$125.446

1,400 1,200 1,000

800 600

200 400

Other Services

Accommodation and Food Services

Education and Training

Transport, Postal and Warehousing Construction

Health Care and Social Assistance Retail Trade

$318.584

$498.500

Manufacturing

$1,287.898

$206.997

$208.129

Regional Imports:

$3.615 Billion

(27)

Taking into consideration potential import replacement opportunities as well as current contributions to the regional economy in terms of employment, value-added and local expenditure on goods and services (backward linkages), key propulsive industries sectors have been identified. In order to understand the contributions of industry sectors in more detail, the general 19 industry sector classification has been broken down to the 45 industry sub-sector level. The following key propulsive industry sub-sectors have been identified as the key drivers of the Mackay Region’s economy:

> Transport

> Construction

> Construction Services

> Mining

CONSTRUCTION (1,326)

TRANSPORT (2,217) MINING (2,277)

CONSTRUCTION SERVICES (2,662)

OTHER (39,493) 82% JOBS

5%

JOB S

3%

JOB S

5% JOB

S

5% JOBS

EMPLOYMENT JOBS

Employment is a key social outcome of economic development; employment data represents the number of people employed by businesses/

organisations in each of the industry sectors in the Mackay Region. The total employment estimate for the Mackay Region is 47,975 jobs. The key propulsive industries collectively contribute 8,482 jobs, accounting for 17.7%

of total Mackay Region jobs.

Between 2011 and 2016, employment within the key propulsive sectors increased by 14.9% from 7,379 jobs in 2011.

Mining was responsible for the majority of growth at an increase of 1,368 jobs where Transport and Construction declined between 2011 and 2016 (-125 and -440 respectively).

At the 45 industry sector level, the largest employer in the region was ‘Retail Trade’ comprising 5,454 jobs and accounting for 11.4% of total Mackay Region jobs.

(28)

54%

EXPORTS

36%

EXPORTS

3%

EXPOR TS

6%

EXPOR TS

EXPORTS ($M)

Regional Exports represents the value of goods and services exported outside of the

Mackay Region that have been generated by local businesses / organisations. Another way of defining exports is as an inflow of money into the region.

The total regional export estimate for the region is $5.065 billion.

The selected sectors collectively contribute $2.344 billion (46.3%) of total regional exports.

At the 45 industry sector level, the largest exporter in the region was the ‘Mining’ sector ($1.821 billion), followed by ‘Food Product Manufacturing’ ($858.771 million), with the third largest exporter being the ‘Transport’

sector ($314.193 million).

CONSTRUCTION ($160.56)

TRANSPORT ($314.19)

MINING ($1,820.57)

CONSTRUCTION SERVICES ($48.82) (1%)

OTHER ($2,721.02)

(29)

The total value-added estimate for the Mackay Region is $7.017 billion. The selected sectors collectively contribute $1.684 billion (24.0%) of total value- added.

At the 45 industry sector level, the largest exporter in the region was the ‘Property Services’

sector ($921.279 million), followed by ‘Mining’ ($797.682 million), with the third largest exporter being the ‘Education

& Training’ sector ($361.422

million). 50%

8%

24%

9%

9%

($M)

CONSTRUCTION

($279.42)

TRANSPORT ($297.20)

MINING ($797.68)

CONSTRUCTION SERVICES ($309.40)

OTHER ($1,683.70)

VALUE-ADDED

References

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